Chapter 8 - Reach for the Top (Textbook), Class 9 English | EduRev Notes

English Class 9

Class 9 : Chapter 8 - Reach for the Top (Textbook), Class 9 English | EduRev Notes

 Page 1


Notes for the Teacher
Units 8–11
8. REACH FOR THE TOP
This unit has two biographical pieces that depict persistent endeavours to
reach the top. Part II of this unit is taken from a newspaper. The language is
very current and idiomatic. An exercise of matching words and phrases to
their meanings has been given as a pre-reading activity to facilitate students’
understanding and appreciation of this part of the text.
In this unit students are asked to imagine that they have to give a speech.
They may wish to read the texts of well-known speeches such as Nehru’s
‘Tryst with Destiny’. A speech is a formal use of spoken language. It must be
prepared meticulously.
The language is formal but should be made powerful by the use of balance
(“Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your
country.” — Kennedy), imagery (“The light has gone out of our lives” — Nehru)
and other such rhetorical devices. It can be enriched by the use of examples
and anecdotes.
The Writing task of composing an article for a school magazine can be prepared
for by looking at other examples of such articles in newspapers. This task
makes a beginning in helping students to write for the print media. Encourage
them to work within a given word limit (such as 500 words, or 1000 words),
and to use everyday, contemporary language.
Help students to write a description of Santosh Yadav’s character by drawing
their attention to her background, likes and dislikes, her humanity and her
contribution to society.
9. THE BOND OF LOVE
This unit is about a strong attachment between a human being and a wild
animal that becomes a pet. Encourage the students to locate the incidents
that show this in the story, and to give examples from their own experience.
The exercise of referring to an index for obtaining specific information on a
given topic aims to strengthen students’ reference skills. Try to add some
examples of your own from other areas of the curriculum where consulting an
index is useful.
The passage to be dictated is a scrambled story. After the dictation, allow the
students to go through their writing carefully to rearrange the incidents logically.
The writing activities are designed to help students to build up an argument.
©NCERT
not to be republished
Page 2


Notes for the Teacher
Units 8–11
8. REACH FOR THE TOP
This unit has two biographical pieces that depict persistent endeavours to
reach the top. Part II of this unit is taken from a newspaper. The language is
very current and idiomatic. An exercise of matching words and phrases to
their meanings has been given as a pre-reading activity to facilitate students’
understanding and appreciation of this part of the text.
In this unit students are asked to imagine that they have to give a speech.
They may wish to read the texts of well-known speeches such as Nehru’s
‘Tryst with Destiny’. A speech is a formal use of spoken language. It must be
prepared meticulously.
The language is formal but should be made powerful by the use of balance
(“Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your
country.” — Kennedy), imagery (“The light has gone out of our lives” — Nehru)
and other such rhetorical devices. It can be enriched by the use of examples
and anecdotes.
The Writing task of composing an article for a school magazine can be prepared
for by looking at other examples of such articles in newspapers. This task
makes a beginning in helping students to write for the print media. Encourage
them to work within a given word limit (such as 500 words, or 1000 words),
and to use everyday, contemporary language.
Help students to write a description of Santosh Yadav’s character by drawing
their attention to her background, likes and dislikes, her humanity and her
contribution to society.
9. THE BOND OF LOVE
This unit is about a strong attachment between a human being and a wild
animal that becomes a pet. Encourage the students to locate the incidents
that show this in the story, and to give examples from their own experience.
The exercise of referring to an index for obtaining specific information on a
given topic aims to strengthen students’ reference skills. Try to add some
examples of your own from other areas of the curriculum where consulting an
index is useful.
The passage to be dictated is a scrambled story. After the dictation, allow the
students to go through their writing carefully to rearrange the incidents logically.
The writing activities are designed to help students to build up an argument.
©NCERT
not to be republished
10. KATHMANDU
‘Kathmandu’ is excerpted from Heaven Lake, a travelogue in which Vikram
Seth gives an account of what he saw, thought and felt when he travelled from
China to Tibet, from Heaven Lake to the Himalayas.
The map reading activity and the activity on locating the possible routes (by
road, rail or air) from Kathmandu to different places in India are designed to
link the lesson to the outside world. Students may wish to consult brochures
or travel guides, visit a  travel agency or call them on the telephone, speak to
people who have been to Nepal, and so on. This is a ‘communicative’ and
‘authentic’ task.
To prepare for the second Speaking task, students can listen to cricket/
football commentaries or eyewitness accounts of the Independence Day/
Republic Day parade in class or at home on radio or T.V.  Encourage them
to observe the use of the language and follow the narration. Have a
discussion in the class on the features of the commentary (its language, its
liveliness, etc.)
 A diary can be an opportunity to write freely about our life and the things
that happen to us — funny, sad, happy, embarrassing or fearful. We also
make notes on places we visit or our encounters with people.
The Writing task suggests that diary entries can form the basis of a
travelogue, and asks students to imagine a journey to Kathmandu. It may be
supplemented by an actual travelogue-writing task given after a long holiday,
or after a class trip out of the town.
11. IF I WERE YOU
This one-act play is to be read aloud in class by assigning roles to students.
Draw the students’ attention to the stage setting, stage directions, description
of the characters, their movements, gestures and tonal variations, since these
combine to bring out the effect of the play.
The play has many examples of wit and irony. Two examples are given in an
exercise. You can add a few more for the students to have a clear understanding.
The dictionary task in this unit is to help children locate the right meaning
from a dictionary for a word they come across while reading. The task draws
students’ attention to ‘signposts’ such as parts of speech that help match use
to meaning. Encourage the students to look at more entries in the dictionary
and observe the meanings of words that occur as different parts of speech
(adjective, noun, verb).
98 / Beehive
©NCERT
not to be republished
Page 3


Notes for the Teacher
Units 8–11
8. REACH FOR THE TOP
This unit has two biographical pieces that depict persistent endeavours to
reach the top. Part II of this unit is taken from a newspaper. The language is
very current and idiomatic. An exercise of matching words and phrases to
their meanings has been given as a pre-reading activity to facilitate students’
understanding and appreciation of this part of the text.
In this unit students are asked to imagine that they have to give a speech.
They may wish to read the texts of well-known speeches such as Nehru’s
‘Tryst with Destiny’. A speech is a formal use of spoken language. It must be
prepared meticulously.
The language is formal but should be made powerful by the use of balance
(“Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your
country.” — Kennedy), imagery (“The light has gone out of our lives” — Nehru)
and other such rhetorical devices. It can be enriched by the use of examples
and anecdotes.
The Writing task of composing an article for a school magazine can be prepared
for by looking at other examples of such articles in newspapers. This task
makes a beginning in helping students to write for the print media. Encourage
them to work within a given word limit (such as 500 words, or 1000 words),
and to use everyday, contemporary language.
Help students to write a description of Santosh Yadav’s character by drawing
their attention to her background, likes and dislikes, her humanity and her
contribution to society.
9. THE BOND OF LOVE
This unit is about a strong attachment between a human being and a wild
animal that becomes a pet. Encourage the students to locate the incidents
that show this in the story, and to give examples from their own experience.
The exercise of referring to an index for obtaining specific information on a
given topic aims to strengthen students’ reference skills. Try to add some
examples of your own from other areas of the curriculum where consulting an
index is useful.
The passage to be dictated is a scrambled story. After the dictation, allow the
students to go through their writing carefully to rearrange the incidents logically.
The writing activities are designed to help students to build up an argument.
©NCERT
not to be republished
10. KATHMANDU
‘Kathmandu’ is excerpted from Heaven Lake, a travelogue in which Vikram
Seth gives an account of what he saw, thought and felt when he travelled from
China to Tibet, from Heaven Lake to the Himalayas.
The map reading activity and the activity on locating the possible routes (by
road, rail or air) from Kathmandu to different places in India are designed to
link the lesson to the outside world. Students may wish to consult brochures
or travel guides, visit a  travel agency or call them on the telephone, speak to
people who have been to Nepal, and so on. This is a ‘communicative’ and
‘authentic’ task.
To prepare for the second Speaking task, students can listen to cricket/
football commentaries or eyewitness accounts of the Independence Day/
Republic Day parade in class or at home on radio or T.V.  Encourage them
to observe the use of the language and follow the narration. Have a
discussion in the class on the features of the commentary (its language, its
liveliness, etc.)
 A diary can be an opportunity to write freely about our life and the things
that happen to us — funny, sad, happy, embarrassing or fearful. We also
make notes on places we visit or our encounters with people.
The Writing task suggests that diary entries can form the basis of a
travelogue, and asks students to imagine a journey to Kathmandu. It may be
supplemented by an actual travelogue-writing task given after a long holiday,
or after a class trip out of the town.
11. IF I WERE YOU
This one-act play is to be read aloud in class by assigning roles to students.
Draw the students’ attention to the stage setting, stage directions, description
of the characters, their movements, gestures and tonal variations, since these
combine to bring out the effect of the play.
The play has many examples of wit and irony. Two examples are given in an
exercise. You can add a few more for the students to have a clear understanding.
The dictionary task in this unit is to help children locate the right meaning
from a dictionary for a word they come across while reading. The task draws
students’ attention to ‘signposts’ such as parts of speech that help match use
to meaning. Encourage the students to look at more entries in the dictionary
and observe the meanings of words that occur as different parts of speech
(adjective, noun, verb).
98 / Beehive
©NCERT
not to be republished
Part I
Santosh Yadav
BEFORE YOU READ
• Think for a while and make a list of three to five persons you
idolise, or admire very much for their achievements. Your
idols may be from any sphere of life — sports, medicine,
media, or art and culture.
• Your teacher will then discuss your choices with you to find
out who the top five idols of your class are.
1. The only woman in the world who
has scaled Mt Everest twice was
born in a society where the birth of
a son was regarded as a blessing,
and a daughter, though not
considered a curse, was not
generally welcome. When her
mother was expecting Santosh, a
travelling ‘holy man’, giving her his
blessing, assumed that she wanted
a son. But, to everyone’s surprise,
the unborn child’s grandmother, who
was standing close by, told him that
they did not want a son. The ‘holy
man’ was also surprised!
Nevertheless, he gave the requested
blessing ... and as destiny would
have it, the blessing seemed to work.
Santosh was born the sixth child in
a family with five sons, a sister to
8. Reach for the Top
©NCERT
not to be republished
Page 4


Notes for the Teacher
Units 8–11
8. REACH FOR THE TOP
This unit has two biographical pieces that depict persistent endeavours to
reach the top. Part II of this unit is taken from a newspaper. The language is
very current and idiomatic. An exercise of matching words and phrases to
their meanings has been given as a pre-reading activity to facilitate students’
understanding and appreciation of this part of the text.
In this unit students are asked to imagine that they have to give a speech.
They may wish to read the texts of well-known speeches such as Nehru’s
‘Tryst with Destiny’. A speech is a formal use of spoken language. It must be
prepared meticulously.
The language is formal but should be made powerful by the use of balance
(“Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your
country.” — Kennedy), imagery (“The light has gone out of our lives” — Nehru)
and other such rhetorical devices. It can be enriched by the use of examples
and anecdotes.
The Writing task of composing an article for a school magazine can be prepared
for by looking at other examples of such articles in newspapers. This task
makes a beginning in helping students to write for the print media. Encourage
them to work within a given word limit (such as 500 words, or 1000 words),
and to use everyday, contemporary language.
Help students to write a description of Santosh Yadav’s character by drawing
their attention to her background, likes and dislikes, her humanity and her
contribution to society.
9. THE BOND OF LOVE
This unit is about a strong attachment between a human being and a wild
animal that becomes a pet. Encourage the students to locate the incidents
that show this in the story, and to give examples from their own experience.
The exercise of referring to an index for obtaining specific information on a
given topic aims to strengthen students’ reference skills. Try to add some
examples of your own from other areas of the curriculum where consulting an
index is useful.
The passage to be dictated is a scrambled story. After the dictation, allow the
students to go through their writing carefully to rearrange the incidents logically.
The writing activities are designed to help students to build up an argument.
©NCERT
not to be republished
10. KATHMANDU
‘Kathmandu’ is excerpted from Heaven Lake, a travelogue in which Vikram
Seth gives an account of what he saw, thought and felt when he travelled from
China to Tibet, from Heaven Lake to the Himalayas.
The map reading activity and the activity on locating the possible routes (by
road, rail or air) from Kathmandu to different places in India are designed to
link the lesson to the outside world. Students may wish to consult brochures
or travel guides, visit a  travel agency or call them on the telephone, speak to
people who have been to Nepal, and so on. This is a ‘communicative’ and
‘authentic’ task.
To prepare for the second Speaking task, students can listen to cricket/
football commentaries or eyewitness accounts of the Independence Day/
Republic Day parade in class or at home on radio or T.V.  Encourage them
to observe the use of the language and follow the narration. Have a
discussion in the class on the features of the commentary (its language, its
liveliness, etc.)
 A diary can be an opportunity to write freely about our life and the things
that happen to us — funny, sad, happy, embarrassing or fearful. We also
make notes on places we visit or our encounters with people.
The Writing task suggests that diary entries can form the basis of a
travelogue, and asks students to imagine a journey to Kathmandu. It may be
supplemented by an actual travelogue-writing task given after a long holiday,
or after a class trip out of the town.
11. IF I WERE YOU
This one-act play is to be read aloud in class by assigning roles to students.
Draw the students’ attention to the stage setting, stage directions, description
of the characters, their movements, gestures and tonal variations, since these
combine to bring out the effect of the play.
The play has many examples of wit and irony. Two examples are given in an
exercise. You can add a few more for the students to have a clear understanding.
The dictionary task in this unit is to help children locate the right meaning
from a dictionary for a word they come across while reading. The task draws
students’ attention to ‘signposts’ such as parts of speech that help match use
to meaning. Encourage the students to look at more entries in the dictionary
and observe the meanings of words that occur as different parts of speech
(adjective, noun, verb).
98 / Beehive
©NCERT
not to be republished
Part I
Santosh Yadav
BEFORE YOU READ
• Think for a while and make a list of three to five persons you
idolise, or admire very much for their achievements. Your
idols may be from any sphere of life — sports, medicine,
media, or art and culture.
• Your teacher will then discuss your choices with you to find
out who the top five idols of your class are.
1. The only woman in the world who
has scaled Mt Everest twice was
born in a society where the birth of
a son was regarded as a blessing,
and a daughter, though not
considered a curse, was not
generally welcome. When her
mother was expecting Santosh, a
travelling ‘holy man’, giving her his
blessing, assumed that she wanted
a son. But, to everyone’s surprise,
the unborn child’s grandmother, who
was standing close by, told him that
they did not want a son. The ‘holy
man’ was also surprised!
Nevertheless, he gave the requested
blessing ... and as destiny would
have it, the blessing seemed to work.
Santosh was born the sixth child in
a family with five sons, a sister to
8. Reach for the Top
©NCERT
not to be republished
100 / Beehive
five brothers. She was born in the small village of
Joniyawas of Rewari District in Haryana.
2. The girl was given the name ‘Santosh’, which
means contentment. But Santosh was not always
content with her place in a traditional way of life.
She began living life on her own terms from the
start. Where other girls wore traditional Indian
dresses, Santosh preferred shorts. Looking back,
she says now, “From the very beginning I was quite
determined that if I chose a correct and a rational
path, the others around me had to change, not me.”
3. Santosh’s parents were affluent landowners who
could afford to send their children to the best
schools, even to the country’s capital, New Delhi,
which was quite close by. But, in line with the
prevailing custom in the family, Santosh had to
make do with the local village school. So, she decided
to fight the system in her own quiet way when
the right moment arrived. And the right moment
came when she turned sixteen. At sixteen, most of
the girls in her village used to get married.
Santosh was also under pressure from her parents
to do the same.
4. A marriage as early as that was the last thing
on her mind. She threatened her parents that she
would never marry if she did not get a proper
education. She left home and got herself enrolled
in a school in Delhi. When her parents refused to
pay for her education, she politely informed them
of her plans to earn money by working part time to
pay her school fees. Her parents then agreed to pay
for her education.
5. Wishing always to study “a bit more” and with
her father slowly getting used to her urge for more
education, Santosh passed the high school
examinations and went to Jaipur. She joined
Maharani College and got a room in Kasturba Hostel.
Santosh remembers, “Kasturba Hostel faced the
the last thing: the
least important thing
in line with: following
or in accordance
with; according to
©NCERT
not to be republished
Page 5


Notes for the Teacher
Units 8–11
8. REACH FOR THE TOP
This unit has two biographical pieces that depict persistent endeavours to
reach the top. Part II of this unit is taken from a newspaper. The language is
very current and idiomatic. An exercise of matching words and phrases to
their meanings has been given as a pre-reading activity to facilitate students’
understanding and appreciation of this part of the text.
In this unit students are asked to imagine that they have to give a speech.
They may wish to read the texts of well-known speeches such as Nehru’s
‘Tryst with Destiny’. A speech is a formal use of spoken language. It must be
prepared meticulously.
The language is formal but should be made powerful by the use of balance
(“Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your
country.” — Kennedy), imagery (“The light has gone out of our lives” — Nehru)
and other such rhetorical devices. It can be enriched by the use of examples
and anecdotes.
The Writing task of composing an article for a school magazine can be prepared
for by looking at other examples of such articles in newspapers. This task
makes a beginning in helping students to write for the print media. Encourage
them to work within a given word limit (such as 500 words, or 1000 words),
and to use everyday, contemporary language.
Help students to write a description of Santosh Yadav’s character by drawing
their attention to her background, likes and dislikes, her humanity and her
contribution to society.
9. THE BOND OF LOVE
This unit is about a strong attachment between a human being and a wild
animal that becomes a pet. Encourage the students to locate the incidents
that show this in the story, and to give examples from their own experience.
The exercise of referring to an index for obtaining specific information on a
given topic aims to strengthen students’ reference skills. Try to add some
examples of your own from other areas of the curriculum where consulting an
index is useful.
The passage to be dictated is a scrambled story. After the dictation, allow the
students to go through their writing carefully to rearrange the incidents logically.
The writing activities are designed to help students to build up an argument.
©NCERT
not to be republished
10. KATHMANDU
‘Kathmandu’ is excerpted from Heaven Lake, a travelogue in which Vikram
Seth gives an account of what he saw, thought and felt when he travelled from
China to Tibet, from Heaven Lake to the Himalayas.
The map reading activity and the activity on locating the possible routes (by
road, rail or air) from Kathmandu to different places in India are designed to
link the lesson to the outside world. Students may wish to consult brochures
or travel guides, visit a  travel agency or call them on the telephone, speak to
people who have been to Nepal, and so on. This is a ‘communicative’ and
‘authentic’ task.
To prepare for the second Speaking task, students can listen to cricket/
football commentaries or eyewitness accounts of the Independence Day/
Republic Day parade in class or at home on radio or T.V.  Encourage them
to observe the use of the language and follow the narration. Have a
discussion in the class on the features of the commentary (its language, its
liveliness, etc.)
 A diary can be an opportunity to write freely about our life and the things
that happen to us — funny, sad, happy, embarrassing or fearful. We also
make notes on places we visit or our encounters with people.
The Writing task suggests that diary entries can form the basis of a
travelogue, and asks students to imagine a journey to Kathmandu. It may be
supplemented by an actual travelogue-writing task given after a long holiday,
or after a class trip out of the town.
11. IF I WERE YOU
This one-act play is to be read aloud in class by assigning roles to students.
Draw the students’ attention to the stage setting, stage directions, description
of the characters, their movements, gestures and tonal variations, since these
combine to bring out the effect of the play.
The play has many examples of wit and irony. Two examples are given in an
exercise. You can add a few more for the students to have a clear understanding.
The dictionary task in this unit is to help children locate the right meaning
from a dictionary for a word they come across while reading. The task draws
students’ attention to ‘signposts’ such as parts of speech that help match use
to meaning. Encourage the students to look at more entries in the dictionary
and observe the meanings of words that occur as different parts of speech
(adjective, noun, verb).
98 / Beehive
©NCERT
not to be republished
Part I
Santosh Yadav
BEFORE YOU READ
• Think for a while and make a list of three to five persons you
idolise, or admire very much for their achievements. Your
idols may be from any sphere of life — sports, medicine,
media, or art and culture.
• Your teacher will then discuss your choices with you to find
out who the top five idols of your class are.
1. The only woman in the world who
has scaled Mt Everest twice was
born in a society where the birth of
a son was regarded as a blessing,
and a daughter, though not
considered a curse, was not
generally welcome. When her
mother was expecting Santosh, a
travelling ‘holy man’, giving her his
blessing, assumed that she wanted
a son. But, to everyone’s surprise,
the unborn child’s grandmother, who
was standing close by, told him that
they did not want a son. The ‘holy
man’ was also surprised!
Nevertheless, he gave the requested
blessing ... and as destiny would
have it, the blessing seemed to work.
Santosh was born the sixth child in
a family with five sons, a sister to
8. Reach for the Top
©NCERT
not to be republished
100 / Beehive
five brothers. She was born in the small village of
Joniyawas of Rewari District in Haryana.
2. The girl was given the name ‘Santosh’, which
means contentment. But Santosh was not always
content with her place in a traditional way of life.
She began living life on her own terms from the
start. Where other girls wore traditional Indian
dresses, Santosh preferred shorts. Looking back,
she says now, “From the very beginning I was quite
determined that if I chose a correct and a rational
path, the others around me had to change, not me.”
3. Santosh’s parents were affluent landowners who
could afford to send their children to the best
schools, even to the country’s capital, New Delhi,
which was quite close by. But, in line with the
prevailing custom in the family, Santosh had to
make do with the local village school. So, she decided
to fight the system in her own quiet way when
the right moment arrived. And the right moment
came when she turned sixteen. At sixteen, most of
the girls in her village used to get married.
Santosh was also under pressure from her parents
to do the same.
4. A marriage as early as that was the last thing
on her mind. She threatened her parents that she
would never marry if she did not get a proper
education. She left home and got herself enrolled
in a school in Delhi. When her parents refused to
pay for her education, she politely informed them
of her plans to earn money by working part time to
pay her school fees. Her parents then agreed to pay
for her education.
5. Wishing always to study “a bit more” and with
her father slowly getting used to her urge for more
education, Santosh passed the high school
examinations and went to Jaipur. She joined
Maharani College and got a room in Kasturba Hostel.
Santosh remembers, “Kasturba Hostel faced the
the last thing: the
least important thing
in line with: following
or in accordance
with; according to
©NCERT
not to be republished
Reach for the Top / 101
Aravalli Hills. I used to watch villagers from my
room, going up the hill and suddenly vanishing after
a while. One day I decided to check it out myself. I
found nobody except a few mountaineers. I asked if
I could join them. To my pleasant surprise, they
answered in the affirmative and motivated me to
take to climbing.”
6. Then there was no looking back for this
determined young girl. She saved money and enrolled
in a course at Uttarkashi’s Nehru Institute of
Mountaineering. “My college semester in Jaipur was
to end in April but it ended on the nineteenth of
May. And I was supposed to be in Uttarkashi on
the twenty-first. So, I did not go back home; instead,
I headed straight for the training. I had to write a
letter of apology to my father without whose
permission I had got myself enrolled at Uttarkashi.”
7. Thereafter, Santosh went on an
expedition every year. Her climbing
skills matured rapidly. Also, she
developed a remarkable resistance to
cold and the altitude. Equipped with
an iron will, physical endurance and
an amazing mental toughness, she
proved herself repeatedly. The
culmination of her hard work and
sincerity came in 1992, just four years
after she had shyly asked the Aravalli
mountaineers if she could join them.
At barely twenty years of age, Santosh
Yadav scaled Mt Everest, becoming the
youngest woman in the world to
achieve the feat. If her climbing skills,
physical fitness, and mental strength
impressed her seniors, her concern for
others and desire to work together with
them found her a special place in the
hearts of fellow climbers.
check it out: find out
(the truth)
Iron will, physical endurance and
mental toughness characterise
Santosh Yadav.
headed straight for:
went towards
©NCERT
not to be republished
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