Introduction - Limited Liability Partnerships, Company Law B Com Notes | EduRev

Company Law

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B Com : Introduction - Limited Liability Partnerships, Company Law B Com Notes | EduRev

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Introduction

Limited Liability Partnership (LLP) is an incorporated partnership formed and registered under the Limited Liability Partnership Act 2008 with limited liability and perpetual succession. The Act came into force, for most part, on 31st March 2009 followed by its Rules on 1st April 2009 and the registration of the first LLP on 2nd April 2009. The arrival of the much-desired and long-awaited LLP Act was result of efforts of several expert committees which recommended its introduction starting with the Bhatt Committee of 1972, Naik Committee of 1992, Abid Hussain Committee of 1997, Gupta Committee of 2001, Naresh Chandra Committee of 2003 and the JJ Irani Committee of 2005. LLP is viewed as an alternative corporate business vehicle that provides the benefits of limited liability but allows its partners the flexibility of organizing their internal structure as a partnership based on a mutually arrived agreement.

The LLP form would enable entrepreneurs, professionals and enterprises providing services of any kind or engaged in scientific and technical disciplines, to form commercially efficient vehicles suited to their requirements. Owing to flexibility in its structure and operation, the LLP would also be a suitable vehicle for small and medium enterprises and for investment by venture capitalists.

Salient Features

The salient features of the Limited Liability Partnership are as follows:—

  1. The LLP is a body corporate and a legal entity separate from its partners. Any two or more persons, associated for carrying on a lawful business with a view to profit, may by subscribing their names to an incorporation document and filing the same with the Registrar, form a Limited Liability Partnership. The LLP has a perpetual succession;
  2. The mutual rights and duties of partners of an LLP inter se and those of the LLP and its partners shall be governed by an agreement between partners or between the LLP and the partners subject to the provisions of the proposed legislation. There would be flexibility to devise the agreement as per their choice. In the absence of any such agreement, the mutual rights and duties shall be governed by the provisions of the proposed legislation;
  3. A LLP is a separate legal entity, liable to the full extent of its assets, with the liability of the partners being limited to their agreed contribution in the LLP which may be tangible or intangible in nature or both tangible and intangible in nature. No partner would be liable on account of the independent or un-authorized acts of other partners or their misconduct; 
  4. Every LLP shall have at least two partners and shall also have at least two individuals as Designated Partners, of whom at least one shall be resident in India.
  5. A LLP shall maintain annual accounts reflecting true and fair view of its state of affairs. A statement of accounts and solvency shall be filed by every LLP with the Registrar every year. The accounts of LLPs shall also be audited, subject to any class of LLPs being exempted from this requirement by the Central Government;
  6. The Central Government has power to investigate the affairs of an LLP, if required, by appointment of competent inspector for the purpose;
  7. The Indian Partnership Act, 1932 shall not be applicable to LLPs. A partnership firm, a private company and an unlisted public company may convert themselves to LLP in accordance with provisions of the proposed legislation;
  8. The Central Government has made rules for carrying out the provisions of the LLP Act.

The Central Government shall have powers to investigate the affairs of an LLP, if required, by appointment of competent inspector for the purpose.

Distinction between LLP and Partnership

The principle points of difference between a company and a partnership are as follows:

  1. LLP is a separate legal entity and therefore, can be sued or it can sue others without involving the partners. A partnership firm is not distinct from the several persons who compose it.
  2. The partners of a LLP would have limited liability i.e. they would not be liable beyond the money contributed by them. Whereas, partners of a firm would have unlimited liability.
  3. The retirement or death of a partner would not dissolve the LLP. On the other hand, the death or retirement of a partner would dissolve the partnership firm.
  4. In a partnership, the property of the firm is the property of the individuals comprising it. In a LLP, it belongs to the LLP and not to the individuals comprising it.
  5. Whereas a partnership can be formed either orally or by a deed of agreement whether registered or not, LLP is formed by an incorporation document and an LLP agreement, thus, giving it a legality.
  6. Whereas a registered or unregistered partnership cannot have more than 20 partners, LLP can have more than that number since no upper limit has been laid down by the Act.
  7. A LLP has perpetual succession, i.e. the death or insolvency of a shareholder or all of them does not affect the life of the LLP, whereas the death or insolvency of a partner dissolves the firm, unless otherwise provided.
  8. Whereas an individual partner would not be able to conduct business transaction with the partnership firm of which he is a partner, a partner of LLP in his separate capacity as a legal person can do business with the LLP since the LLP is a separate legal entity by itself.

Distinction between LLP And Company

  1. In case of LLP, the need for classifying the object clauses into main, ancillary and other objects as well as framing the Share Capital clause in the memorandum for incorporating a company is reduced into a simple procedure of filling of the prescribed information in the Incorporation document and statement in Form No. 2.
  2. In case of LLP, a ‘limited liability partnership agreement’ (LLPA) is prepared which is a variant of the ‘articles of association’ of a company.
  3. Whereas the memorandum of a company is required to name the state in which it is required to be incorporated, there is no such obligation in the case of LLP. Consequently, the detail procedure involved in changing the registered office from the state of incorporation to another state is not required to be followed in case of a LLP.
  4. In the LLP Act, there is no such stipulation for meeting of partners either periodically or compulsory at the year end as stipulated for directors and shareholders meetings in the Companies Act.
  5. There is no separation between management of the company and the ownership as is observed in a company since all the partners, unlike all the directors, can take part in the day to day affairs of the LLP.
  6. In case of a company no individual director can conduct the business of the company but in an LLP, each partner has the authority to do so unless expressly prohibited by the partnership terms.
  7. Whereas, the Companies Act contemplates regulating the remuneration payable to directors, there are no corresponding provisions in the LLP Act for remuneration payable to designated partners. The same could be as per the LLP Agreement.
  8. In the case of LLP, unlike in the case of companies, there are no restrictions on the borrowing powers.
  9. The LLP can choose to maintain the accounts on cash basis/accrual basis whereas under the Companies Act, accrual method is compulsory.
  10. Audit of a company is compulsory. Conversely, the audit of LLP is not compulsory if the capital contributed does not exceed ` 25 lakh or if the turnover does not exceed ` 40 lakhs.
  11. Cost audit as contemplated in Section 233B of the Companies Act, 1956 has not been prescribed for LLPs.
  12. The appointment of Company Secretaries as required under Section 383A of the Companies Act, 1956 is not provided in the LLP Act. However, the annual return of a LLP in form 11 is to be certified as ‘true and correct’ by a Company Secretary in practice. 

Comparison of LLP with Private Limited Company 

A comparison of a LLP with a Private Limited Company reveals that such companies have:

  • Limited Liability: Similar to LLP.
  • Internal flexibility: The Company Law requires a formal board structure and decision making at validly constituted meetings, passing of resolutions and maintenance of minutes of meetings.
  • Privacy: Similar to LLP.
  • Requirement of a LLP agreement: The Memorandum and Articles of Association are the default standard provisions doing away with the need for a separate agreement similar to a LLP agreement.
  • Legal uncertainty: Private Limited companies have long been in existence and being tried and tested vehicles of business entities, there is no legal uncertainty which is not true in case of a LLP.

The LLP structure seems most suited for partnership concerns set up by professionals such as company secretaries in practice and others, by offering them the benefits of limited liability on one hand and the flexibility in internal management that is akin to partnerships on the other. Venture capitalists might also be attracted to the LLP structure owing to the ability of the partners to participate in management without the risk of losing limited liability, the absence of capital maintenance rules and the likely advantageous tax position. The laws of U.S.A., U.K., Singapore and Australia permit formation of LLPs.

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