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Ionic, Covalent, and Metallic Bonds - Chemical Bonding Video Lecture | Chemistry for GRE Paper II

131 videos|248 docs|77 tests

FAQs on Ionic, Covalent, and Metallic Bonds - Chemical Bonding Video Lecture - Chemistry for GRE Paper II

1. What is an ionic bond?
An ionic bond is a type of chemical bond that forms between two atoms when one atom transfers electrons to another atom. This transfer of electrons creates charged particles known as ions. One atom becomes positively charged (cation) because it loses electrons, while the other atom becomes negatively charged (anion) because it gains the electrons. The positive and negative charges attract each other, creating the ionic bond.
2. How does a covalent bond form?
A covalent bond is a type of chemical bond that forms when two atoms share electrons. In this type of bond, neither atom completely loses or gains electrons like in an ionic bond. Instead, the electrons are shared between the two atoms, creating a stable electron configuration for both. Covalent bonds usually form between nonmetal atoms because they have similar electronegativities, allowing for equal sharing of electrons.
3. What are the properties of ionic compounds?
Ionic compounds have several distinct properties. Firstly, they typically have high melting and boiling points due to the strong electrostatic attraction between the oppositely charged ions. Secondly, they are often soluble in polar solvents such as water because the polar solvent molecules can surround and separate the ions. Thirdly, ionic compounds can conduct electricity when dissolved in water or in a molten state because the ions are free to move and carry electric charge.
4. How do metallic bonds differ from ionic and covalent bonds?
Metallic bonds are different from ionic and covalent bonds in several ways. In a metallic bond, the valence electrons of metal atoms are delocalized and free to move throughout the entire metal lattice. This results in the characteristic properties of metals such as high electrical and thermal conductivity, malleability, and ductility. Unlike ionic or covalent bonds, metallic bonds do not involve the transfer or sharing of electrons between atoms.
5. What factors determine the strength of a chemical bond?
The strength of a chemical bond is determined by several factors. Firstly, the distance between the nuclei of the bonded atoms plays a crucial role. The closer the nuclei, the stronger the bond. Secondly, the number of shared or transferred electrons also affects bond strength. More shared or transferred electrons lead to stronger bonds. Lastly, the electronegativity difference between atoms can influence bond strength. Greater electronegativity difference results in stronger ionic or polar covalent bonds.
131 videos|248 docs|77 tests

Timeline

00:00 Introduction
00:58 Ionic Bond
05:13 Question 1
06:08 Covalent Bond
10:50 Metallic Bond
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