NCERT Textbook - Bepin Choudhury’s Lapse of Memory Class 8 Notes | EduRev

English Honeydew Class 8

Class 8 : NCERT Textbook - Bepin Choudhury’s Lapse of Memory Class 8 Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


UNITS 4-7
 Bepin Choudhury’s Lapse of Memory
A Satyajit Ray story with a surprise ending that brings in its wake
the much needed psychological relief to the sophisticated executive
beleagured by a conspiracy, which is a humorous take after all.
Before asking children to read the text, tell the story part by part,
each part ending where the listener wonders what comes next.
Activity 3 under working with language is about two tense
forms — simple past and present perfect. Notice how both
have been used in conjunction with each other . The following
explanatory notes may be useful.
• The present perfect tense is used to refer to an action
initiated and completed in the past and is associated with
the present. It has its effect on the present situation.
I have seen the Taj. (I know what it looks like.)
He has arrived. (He is here.)
I have finished my work. (I am free now.)
Present perfect tense is usual with already , so far,not yet, ever ,
never etc.
It is not used with ago, yesterday , last week/month/year , etc.
 The Last Bargain
Here is a method of teaching that may be tried.
(a) Let children read the first stanza silently.
Ask the following questions.
(i) How many persons/characters are there?
(ii) Who are they?
(iii) Who is big and who is small?
(iv) What does the person in the first line say?
(v) What does the other one in the fourth line say?
(vi) Do they stay together or part company? Why?
2019-2020
Page 2


UNITS 4-7
 Bepin Choudhury’s Lapse of Memory
A Satyajit Ray story with a surprise ending that brings in its wake
the much needed psychological relief to the sophisticated executive
beleagured by a conspiracy, which is a humorous take after all.
Before asking children to read the text, tell the story part by part,
each part ending where the listener wonders what comes next.
Activity 3 under working with language is about two tense
forms — simple past and present perfect. Notice how both
have been used in conjunction with each other . The following
explanatory notes may be useful.
• The present perfect tense is used to refer to an action
initiated and completed in the past and is associated with
the present. It has its effect on the present situation.
I have seen the Taj. (I know what it looks like.)
He has arrived. (He is here.)
I have finished my work. (I am free now.)
Present perfect tense is usual with already , so far,not yet, ever ,
never etc.
It is not used with ago, yesterday , last week/month/year , etc.
 The Last Bargain
Here is a method of teaching that may be tried.
(a) Let children read the first stanza silently.
Ask the following questions.
(i) How many persons/characters are there?
(ii) Who are they?
(iii) Who is big and who is small?
(iv) What does the person in the first line say?
(v) What does the other one in the fourth line say?
(vi) Do they stay together or part company? Why?
2019-2020
54 Honeydew
(b) Now reconstruct the episode. Begin like this.
I was walking on the road looking for work. I saw the king in
his chariot. He had a sword in his hand. He was very kind to
me. He shook my hand and offered to hire me. I did not
accept his offer . T o me, power is not a valuable thing. It is not
permanent. It won’t make me happy. I was looking for
something else as a reward for my work.
What is he looking for?
Let us read the next stanza.
(c) Do the other stanzas in the same way.
The clue to what the person is looking for lies in the last line.
The operative phrases are ‘the child’s play’ and ‘a free man’.
The child and her/his play is a metaphor for innocence and inward
happiness, which gives this person a sense of fulfilment and
freedom from stress and strife. He feels genuinely free and happy
in the company of the child.
Recite each stanza with feeling, pausing at the right places.
The method suggested may work better for a poem with a story.
 The Summit Within
Adventure and the world of nature – the arduous task of
reaching the highest summit in the world makes the climber
reflect on the ‘internal summits’ which are, perhaps, higher
than the Everest. The text underscores the physical, emotional
and spiritual aspects of the adventure in a single perspective.
Divide the text into three parts.  A convenient division is
suggested here.
‘...............that mountains are a means of communion with
God’. (end of Part-I)
‘It is emotional. It is spiritual’. (end of Part-II)
The remaining is Part-III.
Design while-reading comprehension questions for each part.
The multiple choice items are given at the end of the lesson. Y ou
may try the following as additional questions.
What is the author’s personal answer to the question as to
why people climb mountains?
How is the same question answered in Part-II in a different way?
2019-2020
Page 3


UNITS 4-7
 Bepin Choudhury’s Lapse of Memory
A Satyajit Ray story with a surprise ending that brings in its wake
the much needed psychological relief to the sophisticated executive
beleagured by a conspiracy, which is a humorous take after all.
Before asking children to read the text, tell the story part by part,
each part ending where the listener wonders what comes next.
Activity 3 under working with language is about two tense
forms — simple past and present perfect. Notice how both
have been used in conjunction with each other . The following
explanatory notes may be useful.
• The present perfect tense is used to refer to an action
initiated and completed in the past and is associated with
the present. It has its effect on the present situation.
I have seen the Taj. (I know what it looks like.)
He has arrived. (He is here.)
I have finished my work. (I am free now.)
Present perfect tense is usual with already , so far,not yet, ever ,
never etc.
It is not used with ago, yesterday , last week/month/year , etc.
 The Last Bargain
Here is a method of teaching that may be tried.
(a) Let children read the first stanza silently.
Ask the following questions.
(i) How many persons/characters are there?
(ii) Who are they?
(iii) Who is big and who is small?
(iv) What does the person in the first line say?
(v) What does the other one in the fourth line say?
(vi) Do they stay together or part company? Why?
2019-2020
54 Honeydew
(b) Now reconstruct the episode. Begin like this.
I was walking on the road looking for work. I saw the king in
his chariot. He had a sword in his hand. He was very kind to
me. He shook my hand and offered to hire me. I did not
accept his offer . T o me, power is not a valuable thing. It is not
permanent. It won’t make me happy. I was looking for
something else as a reward for my work.
What is he looking for?
Let us read the next stanza.
(c) Do the other stanzas in the same way.
The clue to what the person is looking for lies in the last line.
The operative phrases are ‘the child’s play’ and ‘a free man’.
The child and her/his play is a metaphor for innocence and inward
happiness, which gives this person a sense of fulfilment and
freedom from stress and strife. He feels genuinely free and happy
in the company of the child.
Recite each stanza with feeling, pausing at the right places.
The method suggested may work better for a poem with a story.
 The Summit Within
Adventure and the world of nature – the arduous task of
reaching the highest summit in the world makes the climber
reflect on the ‘internal summits’ which are, perhaps, higher
than the Everest. The text underscores the physical, emotional
and spiritual aspects of the adventure in a single perspective.
Divide the text into three parts.  A convenient division is
suggested here.
‘...............that mountains are a means of communion with
God’. (end of Part-I)
‘It is emotional. It is spiritual’. (end of Part-II)
The remaining is Part-III.
Design while-reading comprehension questions for each part.
The multiple choice items are given at the end of the lesson. Y ou
may try the following as additional questions.
What is the author’s personal answer to the question as to
why people climb mountains?
How is the same question answered in Part-II in a different way?
2019-2020
Notes for the Teacher 55
Famous climbers have recorded how they needed just that
help? Explain the italicised phrase.
Looking round from the summit, you tell yourself that
_____________________________.
(a) Complete this sentence using the same words as in the
text without referring to the book.
(b) Now complete it using a clause/phrase of your own
without changing meaning.
Activities 2 and 3 under working with language provide ample
opportunities for vocabulary development. Extend Activity 2
by choosing new words from the text to cover their adjective
and/or adverb forms.
remark – remarkable – remarkably
type – typical – typically
Use each item in a meaningful context, involving more than one
sentence.
‘What you say is not appropriate, though it’s a good remark.’
‘Isn’t that remarkable?’
‘It may be so, but it doesn’t mean you are remarkably objective.’
Y ou may not find the dialogue above remarkable enough, but
it meets the immediate requirement appropriately.
Re-read and discuss passages where the author’s admiration
for the mountains and passion for adventure comes through.
 The School Boy
A school is a place where children and teachers assemble every
morning to learn from one another . Find out if any child would
like to describe school in a different way.
An interesting discussion on different types of schools,
supported by pictures from magazines/newspapers, may
ensue — a village school where children are sitting on the floor;
another school where they are sitting at long desks; an outdoor
lesson under a tree, etc.
Ask children how they reach school. Do they walk or take a
bus, etc.? What problems others in remote areas may face in
reaching school on time?
Any suggestions as to how to make school an interesting and
enjoyable place!
2019-2020
Page 4


UNITS 4-7
 Bepin Choudhury’s Lapse of Memory
A Satyajit Ray story with a surprise ending that brings in its wake
the much needed psychological relief to the sophisticated executive
beleagured by a conspiracy, which is a humorous take after all.
Before asking children to read the text, tell the story part by part,
each part ending where the listener wonders what comes next.
Activity 3 under working with language is about two tense
forms — simple past and present perfect. Notice how both
have been used in conjunction with each other . The following
explanatory notes may be useful.
• The present perfect tense is used to refer to an action
initiated and completed in the past and is associated with
the present. It has its effect on the present situation.
I have seen the Taj. (I know what it looks like.)
He has arrived. (He is here.)
I have finished my work. (I am free now.)
Present perfect tense is usual with already , so far,not yet, ever ,
never etc.
It is not used with ago, yesterday , last week/month/year , etc.
 The Last Bargain
Here is a method of teaching that may be tried.
(a) Let children read the first stanza silently.
Ask the following questions.
(i) How many persons/characters are there?
(ii) Who are they?
(iii) Who is big and who is small?
(iv) What does the person in the first line say?
(v) What does the other one in the fourth line say?
(vi) Do they stay together or part company? Why?
2019-2020
54 Honeydew
(b) Now reconstruct the episode. Begin like this.
I was walking on the road looking for work. I saw the king in
his chariot. He had a sword in his hand. He was very kind to
me. He shook my hand and offered to hire me. I did not
accept his offer . T o me, power is not a valuable thing. It is not
permanent. It won’t make me happy. I was looking for
something else as a reward for my work.
What is he looking for?
Let us read the next stanza.
(c) Do the other stanzas in the same way.
The clue to what the person is looking for lies in the last line.
The operative phrases are ‘the child’s play’ and ‘a free man’.
The child and her/his play is a metaphor for innocence and inward
happiness, which gives this person a sense of fulfilment and
freedom from stress and strife. He feels genuinely free and happy
in the company of the child.
Recite each stanza with feeling, pausing at the right places.
The method suggested may work better for a poem with a story.
 The Summit Within
Adventure and the world of nature – the arduous task of
reaching the highest summit in the world makes the climber
reflect on the ‘internal summits’ which are, perhaps, higher
than the Everest. The text underscores the physical, emotional
and spiritual aspects of the adventure in a single perspective.
Divide the text into three parts.  A convenient division is
suggested here.
‘...............that mountains are a means of communion with
God’. (end of Part-I)
‘It is emotional. It is spiritual’. (end of Part-II)
The remaining is Part-III.
Design while-reading comprehension questions for each part.
The multiple choice items are given at the end of the lesson. Y ou
may try the following as additional questions.
What is the author’s personal answer to the question as to
why people climb mountains?
How is the same question answered in Part-II in a different way?
2019-2020
Notes for the Teacher 55
Famous climbers have recorded how they needed just that
help? Explain the italicised phrase.
Looking round from the summit, you tell yourself that
_____________________________.
(a) Complete this sentence using the same words as in the
text without referring to the book.
(b) Now complete it using a clause/phrase of your own
without changing meaning.
Activities 2 and 3 under working with language provide ample
opportunities for vocabulary development. Extend Activity 2
by choosing new words from the text to cover their adjective
and/or adverb forms.
remark – remarkable – remarkably
type – typical – typically
Use each item in a meaningful context, involving more than one
sentence.
‘What you say is not appropriate, though it’s a good remark.’
‘Isn’t that remarkable?’
‘It may be so, but it doesn’t mean you are remarkably objective.’
Y ou may not find the dialogue above remarkable enough, but
it meets the immediate requirement appropriately.
Re-read and discuss passages where the author’s admiration
for the mountains and passion for adventure comes through.
 The School Boy
A school is a place where children and teachers assemble every
morning to learn from one another . Find out if any child would
like to describe school in a different way.
An interesting discussion on different types of schools,
supported by pictures from magazines/newspapers, may
ensue — a village school where children are sitting on the floor;
another school where they are sitting at long desks; an outdoor
lesson under a tree, etc.
Ask children how they reach school. Do they walk or take a
bus, etc.? What problems others in remote areas may face in
reaching school on time?
Any suggestions as to how to make school an interesting and
enjoyable place!
2019-2020
56 Honeydew
 This is Jody’s Fawn
A story about a child’s emotional preoccupation with the fawn
whose mother had to be killed to save his father’s life. The
story highlights values such as compassion and justice, care
and concern for human and animal life.
Spend some time on a discussion about ‘home remedies’ for
commonplace health problems/ailments. Should we see a
doctor about every little thing, or should we talk to the
grandmother first?
The growing concern about preservation of environment and
protection of animal life has gone a long way in persuading schools
to refrain from dissecting animals for experiment. Elicit children’s
comments on the issue and on the law that punishes humans
for hurting animals.
Activity 1 under working with language is about reporting
questions – yes/no and wh-questions. The use of ‘if/whether’
in the case of yes/no type questions should be explicitly
explained. Devise separate exercises for teaching the use of
‘if/whether’, the appropriate reporting verb, the changes in
pronominals in the reported speech and the sequence of tenses.
Here is a simple exercise to exemplify some of these points.
Choose the correct word to complete statements in indirect speech
given below . Write words in the blanks given.
(a) “Where do you come from?”
I ___________(said/asked) him where ______________ (he/
you) come from.
(b) “What is your name?”
He asked me what ____________ (my/his) name. (is/was)
(c) “Are you happy?”
I asked him ______________ (if/whether) he _____________
(is/was) happy.
(d) “Do you live here?”
He asked me ___________ (whether/if) I ____________ (live/
lived) ___________ (here/there).
(e) “Why are you crying?”
The teacher asked the child ______________ (if/why) she
_____ (is/was/were) crying.
2019-2020
Page 5


UNITS 4-7
 Bepin Choudhury’s Lapse of Memory
A Satyajit Ray story with a surprise ending that brings in its wake
the much needed psychological relief to the sophisticated executive
beleagured by a conspiracy, which is a humorous take after all.
Before asking children to read the text, tell the story part by part,
each part ending where the listener wonders what comes next.
Activity 3 under working with language is about two tense
forms — simple past and present perfect. Notice how both
have been used in conjunction with each other . The following
explanatory notes may be useful.
• The present perfect tense is used to refer to an action
initiated and completed in the past and is associated with
the present. It has its effect on the present situation.
I have seen the Taj. (I know what it looks like.)
He has arrived. (He is here.)
I have finished my work. (I am free now.)
Present perfect tense is usual with already , so far,not yet, ever ,
never etc.
It is not used with ago, yesterday , last week/month/year , etc.
 The Last Bargain
Here is a method of teaching that may be tried.
(a) Let children read the first stanza silently.
Ask the following questions.
(i) How many persons/characters are there?
(ii) Who are they?
(iii) Who is big and who is small?
(iv) What does the person in the first line say?
(v) What does the other one in the fourth line say?
(vi) Do they stay together or part company? Why?
2019-2020
54 Honeydew
(b) Now reconstruct the episode. Begin like this.
I was walking on the road looking for work. I saw the king in
his chariot. He had a sword in his hand. He was very kind to
me. He shook my hand and offered to hire me. I did not
accept his offer . T o me, power is not a valuable thing. It is not
permanent. It won’t make me happy. I was looking for
something else as a reward for my work.
What is he looking for?
Let us read the next stanza.
(c) Do the other stanzas in the same way.
The clue to what the person is looking for lies in the last line.
The operative phrases are ‘the child’s play’ and ‘a free man’.
The child and her/his play is a metaphor for innocence and inward
happiness, which gives this person a sense of fulfilment and
freedom from stress and strife. He feels genuinely free and happy
in the company of the child.
Recite each stanza with feeling, pausing at the right places.
The method suggested may work better for a poem with a story.
 The Summit Within
Adventure and the world of nature – the arduous task of
reaching the highest summit in the world makes the climber
reflect on the ‘internal summits’ which are, perhaps, higher
than the Everest. The text underscores the physical, emotional
and spiritual aspects of the adventure in a single perspective.
Divide the text into three parts.  A convenient division is
suggested here.
‘...............that mountains are a means of communion with
God’. (end of Part-I)
‘It is emotional. It is spiritual’. (end of Part-II)
The remaining is Part-III.
Design while-reading comprehension questions for each part.
The multiple choice items are given at the end of the lesson. Y ou
may try the following as additional questions.
What is the author’s personal answer to the question as to
why people climb mountains?
How is the same question answered in Part-II in a different way?
2019-2020
Notes for the Teacher 55
Famous climbers have recorded how they needed just that
help? Explain the italicised phrase.
Looking round from the summit, you tell yourself that
_____________________________.
(a) Complete this sentence using the same words as in the
text without referring to the book.
(b) Now complete it using a clause/phrase of your own
without changing meaning.
Activities 2 and 3 under working with language provide ample
opportunities for vocabulary development. Extend Activity 2
by choosing new words from the text to cover their adjective
and/or adverb forms.
remark – remarkable – remarkably
type – typical – typically
Use each item in a meaningful context, involving more than one
sentence.
‘What you say is not appropriate, though it’s a good remark.’
‘Isn’t that remarkable?’
‘It may be so, but it doesn’t mean you are remarkably objective.’
Y ou may not find the dialogue above remarkable enough, but
it meets the immediate requirement appropriately.
Re-read and discuss passages where the author’s admiration
for the mountains and passion for adventure comes through.
 The School Boy
A school is a place where children and teachers assemble every
morning to learn from one another . Find out if any child would
like to describe school in a different way.
An interesting discussion on different types of schools,
supported by pictures from magazines/newspapers, may
ensue — a village school where children are sitting on the floor;
another school where they are sitting at long desks; an outdoor
lesson under a tree, etc.
Ask children how they reach school. Do they walk or take a
bus, etc.? What problems others in remote areas may face in
reaching school on time?
Any suggestions as to how to make school an interesting and
enjoyable place!
2019-2020
56 Honeydew
 This is Jody’s Fawn
A story about a child’s emotional preoccupation with the fawn
whose mother had to be killed to save his father’s life. The
story highlights values such as compassion and justice, care
and concern for human and animal life.
Spend some time on a discussion about ‘home remedies’ for
commonplace health problems/ailments. Should we see a
doctor about every little thing, or should we talk to the
grandmother first?
The growing concern about preservation of environment and
protection of animal life has gone a long way in persuading schools
to refrain from dissecting animals for experiment. Elicit children’s
comments on the issue and on the law that punishes humans
for hurting animals.
Activity 1 under working with language is about reporting
questions – yes/no and wh-questions. The use of ‘if/whether’
in the case of yes/no type questions should be explicitly
explained. Devise separate exercises for teaching the use of
‘if/whether’, the appropriate reporting verb, the changes in
pronominals in the reported speech and the sequence of tenses.
Here is a simple exercise to exemplify some of these points.
Choose the correct word to complete statements in indirect speech
given below . Write words in the blanks given.
(a) “Where do you come from?”
I ___________(said/asked) him where ______________ (he/
you) come from.
(b) “What is your name?”
He asked me what ____________ (my/his) name. (is/was)
(c) “Are you happy?”
I asked him ______________ (if/whether) he _____________
(is/was) happy.
(d) “Do you live here?”
He asked me ___________ (whether/if) I ____________ (live/
lived) ___________ (here/there).
(e) “Why are you crying?”
The teacher asked the child ______________ (if/why) she
_____ (is/was/were) crying.
2019-2020
Notes for the Teacher 57
Here is another exercise.
Read the following dialogue between Jody and his father . Rewrite
their conversation in indirect speech.
Penny lay quiet, staring at the ceiling.
“Boy , you’ve got me hemmed in.”
“It won’t take much to raise the fawn.
It will soon start eating leaves.”
“Y ou are smarter than boys of your age.”
“We took its mother, and it wasn’t to blame.”
“It seems ungrateful to leave it to starve.”
Begin like this:
Penny lay quiet staring at the ceiling. He said to Jody that
______________________________________________. Jody replied
that it wouldn’t _________________________
Activity 2 under working with language deals with transitive
and intransitive verbs.
Ask children to underline the direct object in the following
sentences.
He brought me a colourful umbrella.
I will write a letter to him.
Y ou should give yourself a chance.
Activity 3 under writing may be linked with the first task
covering home remedies under ‘Before you read,’ It will be
useful to take it up separately also.
 A Visit to Cambridge
Excerpt from a travelogue highlighting exchange of views
between two extraordinary persons on what it means to be
‘differently abled’. A tour through Cambridge had a surprise,
both pleasant and poignant, for the author . He met the brilliant
and completely paralysed author of A Brief History of Time,
and talked to him for a full half-hour .
Activity 2 under working with language is about the present
participle (dancing/walking) used as adjective.
Running on the road, he saw __________. (participle)
The train is running. __________ (verb)
2019-2020
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