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NCERT Textbook: Fire: Friend & Foe Notes | Study English Honeycomb Class 7 - Class 7

Document Description: NCERT Textbook: Fire: Friend & Foe for Class 7 2022 is part of English Honeycomb Class 7 preparation. The notes and questions for NCERT Textbook: Fire: Friend & Foe have been prepared according to the Class 7 exam syllabus. Information about NCERT Textbook: Fire: Friend & Foe covers topics like and NCERT Textbook: Fire: Friend & Foe Example, for Class 7 2022 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises and tests below for NCERT Textbook: Fire: Friend & Foe.

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 Page 1


N N N N NOTES OTES OTES OTES OTES     FOR FOR FOR FOR FOR     THE THE THE THE THE T T T T TEACHER EACHER EACHER EACHER EACHER
UNITS 8–10
   Fire: Friend and Foe
v Natural phenomenon—fire is both friend and enemy. An
informative piece about a potential hazard that can easily
be prevented.
v The point that the simple present tense signifies habitual
or repeated actions rather than the present time needs
reiteration and further practice. Build on Activity I under
‘Working with Language’ and design two or three
additional tasks. It will be interesting to show simple
present in contrast with present continuous.
• I walk to school every morning. Today I am taking a bus.
• W e have our morning assembly before the first hour, but
today we are attending a special programme instead on
health and hygiene.
v The writing activity, as after ‘The Ashes that Made Trees
Bloom’, is for further practice in language analysis.
v Read aloud the news item in the box at the end of the lesson.
Ask children to find other news items/headlines on a
specified theme. Display some on the class bulletin board.
Meadow Surprises
v Let children find pictures of a butterfly and other insects/
birds, a buttercup and other flowers that they know, a
rabbit and/or a running brook and arrange the pictures
in a patchwork design of their choice.
v Activity 4 can be taken up as a mini project. Involve groups
of children in doing it. The paragraph(s) or poem(s) written
at the end of the week may be put up on the class
bulletin board.
2020-21
Page 2


N N N N NOTES OTES OTES OTES OTES     FOR FOR FOR FOR FOR     THE THE THE THE THE T T T T TEACHER EACHER EACHER EACHER EACHER
UNITS 8–10
   Fire: Friend and Foe
v Natural phenomenon—fire is both friend and enemy. An
informative piece about a potential hazard that can easily
be prevented.
v The point that the simple present tense signifies habitual
or repeated actions rather than the present time needs
reiteration and further practice. Build on Activity I under
‘Working with Language’ and design two or three
additional tasks. It will be interesting to show simple
present in contrast with present continuous.
• I walk to school every morning. Today I am taking a bus.
• W e have our morning assembly before the first hour, but
today we are attending a special programme instead on
health and hygiene.
v The writing activity, as after ‘The Ashes that Made Trees
Bloom’, is for further practice in language analysis.
v Read aloud the news item in the box at the end of the lesson.
Ask children to find other news items/headlines on a
specified theme. Display some on the class bulletin board.
Meadow Surprises
v Let children find pictures of a butterfly and other insects/
birds, a buttercup and other flowers that they know, a
rabbit and/or a running brook and arrange the pictures
in a patchwork design of their choice.
v Activity 4 can be taken up as a mini project. Involve groups
of children in doing it. The paragraph(s) or poem(s) written
at the end of the week may be put up on the class
bulletin board.
2020-21
112/HONEYCOMB
v Encourage children to share with their peers any
interesting ‘surprise’ that they may have come across.
A Bicycle in Good Repair
v Humour — exaggerated details of a commonplace
event (pleasure ride on a bicycle) that never takes
off, though numerous unexpected things happen
in the process.
v Short notes on modal auxiliaries are given preceding the
three exercises under ‘Working with Language’. These
may be suitably expanded, if necessary. However, the
skill to use modals appropriately in contexts should
receive primary focus in preference over out-of-context
explanations.
v Activity 4 on ‘en’ as prefix, suffix or as part of the word
should be completed in more than one session. One
period may be devoted to each part including
intermittent queries and explanations and the writing
work involved.
Garden Snake
v Recite the poem with correct pauses.
v Draw children’s attention to the following.
1. That snake in the grass reported me to the
Headmistress.
Does ‘snake’ refer to a snake in the meadow/grass
or to a treacherous person who pretends to be a
friend? ‘A snake in the grass’ is an idiom.
2. ‘Snake’ can be used as a verb.
• The road snakes its way through the mountains.
(follows a twisting, winding course)
• The river snaked away into the distance.  (moving
like a snake, disappeared)
3. ‘snaky’ (like a snake)
• the snaky movements of the young dancers
• narrow snaky paths through the hill
112/HONEYCOMB
2020-21
Page 3


N N N N NOTES OTES OTES OTES OTES     FOR FOR FOR FOR FOR     THE THE THE THE THE T T T T TEACHER EACHER EACHER EACHER EACHER
UNITS 8–10
   Fire: Friend and Foe
v Natural phenomenon—fire is both friend and enemy. An
informative piece about a potential hazard that can easily
be prevented.
v The point that the simple present tense signifies habitual
or repeated actions rather than the present time needs
reiteration and further practice. Build on Activity I under
‘Working with Language’ and design two or three
additional tasks. It will be interesting to show simple
present in contrast with present continuous.
• I walk to school every morning. Today I am taking a bus.
• W e have our morning assembly before the first hour, but
today we are attending a special programme instead on
health and hygiene.
v The writing activity, as after ‘The Ashes that Made Trees
Bloom’, is for further practice in language analysis.
v Read aloud the news item in the box at the end of the lesson.
Ask children to find other news items/headlines on a
specified theme. Display some on the class bulletin board.
Meadow Surprises
v Let children find pictures of a butterfly and other insects/
birds, a buttercup and other flowers that they know, a
rabbit and/or a running brook and arrange the pictures
in a patchwork design of their choice.
v Activity 4 can be taken up as a mini project. Involve groups
of children in doing it. The paragraph(s) or poem(s) written
at the end of the week may be put up on the class
bulletin board.
2020-21
112/HONEYCOMB
v Encourage children to share with their peers any
interesting ‘surprise’ that they may have come across.
A Bicycle in Good Repair
v Humour — exaggerated details of a commonplace
event (pleasure ride on a bicycle) that never takes
off, though numerous unexpected things happen
in the process.
v Short notes on modal auxiliaries are given preceding the
three exercises under ‘Working with Language’. These
may be suitably expanded, if necessary. However, the
skill to use modals appropriately in contexts should
receive primary focus in preference over out-of-context
explanations.
v Activity 4 on ‘en’ as prefix, suffix or as part of the word
should be completed in more than one session. One
period may be devoted to each part including
intermittent queries and explanations and the writing
work involved.
Garden Snake
v Recite the poem with correct pauses.
v Draw children’s attention to the following.
1. That snake in the grass reported me to the
Headmistress.
Does ‘snake’ refer to a snake in the meadow/grass
or to a treacherous person who pretends to be a
friend? ‘A snake in the grass’ is an idiom.
2. ‘Snake’ can be used as a verb.
• The road snakes its way through the mountains.
(follows a twisting, winding course)
• The river snaked away into the distance.  (moving
like a snake, disappeared)
3. ‘snaky’ (like a snake)
• the snaky movements of the young dancers
• narrow snaky paths through the hill
112/HONEYCOMB
2020-21
FIRE: FRIEND AND FOE/113
     The Story of Cricket
v Games and sport — the story of cricket told in a historical
perspective, the continuity of the game down the ages
and its emergence as the most popular modern sport and
entertainment.
v Though the text is rather long and challenging, the content
is exciting enough to work well in class. Most children
know something about the game including names of
players/teams, and will show enthusiasm for the story
of cricket. Photographs given will enhance their interest
in the lesson.
v No time need be expended on memorisation/recall of
dates/years, names of places and clubs, measurements,
etc.  Additional sectioning of parts and designing of while-
reading comprehension checks, as suggested elsewhere,
will be of special use here.
v ‘Wordsearch’ clues to be explained at length before the
activity is attempted.  Another ‘Wordsearch’ for games-
related words and phrases can easily be prepared in class.
NOTES FOR THE TEACHER/113
2020-21
Page 4


N N N N NOTES OTES OTES OTES OTES     FOR FOR FOR FOR FOR     THE THE THE THE THE T T T T TEACHER EACHER EACHER EACHER EACHER
UNITS 8–10
   Fire: Friend and Foe
v Natural phenomenon—fire is both friend and enemy. An
informative piece about a potential hazard that can easily
be prevented.
v The point that the simple present tense signifies habitual
or repeated actions rather than the present time needs
reiteration and further practice. Build on Activity I under
‘Working with Language’ and design two or three
additional tasks. It will be interesting to show simple
present in contrast with present continuous.
• I walk to school every morning. Today I am taking a bus.
• W e have our morning assembly before the first hour, but
today we are attending a special programme instead on
health and hygiene.
v The writing activity, as after ‘The Ashes that Made Trees
Bloom’, is for further practice in language analysis.
v Read aloud the news item in the box at the end of the lesson.
Ask children to find other news items/headlines on a
specified theme. Display some on the class bulletin board.
Meadow Surprises
v Let children find pictures of a butterfly and other insects/
birds, a buttercup and other flowers that they know, a
rabbit and/or a running brook and arrange the pictures
in a patchwork design of their choice.
v Activity 4 can be taken up as a mini project. Involve groups
of children in doing it. The paragraph(s) or poem(s) written
at the end of the week may be put up on the class
bulletin board.
2020-21
112/HONEYCOMB
v Encourage children to share with their peers any
interesting ‘surprise’ that they may have come across.
A Bicycle in Good Repair
v Humour — exaggerated details of a commonplace
event (pleasure ride on a bicycle) that never takes
off, though numerous unexpected things happen
in the process.
v Short notes on modal auxiliaries are given preceding the
three exercises under ‘Working with Language’. These
may be suitably expanded, if necessary. However, the
skill to use modals appropriately in contexts should
receive primary focus in preference over out-of-context
explanations.
v Activity 4 on ‘en’ as prefix, suffix or as part of the word
should be completed in more than one session. One
period may be devoted to each part including
intermittent queries and explanations and the writing
work involved.
Garden Snake
v Recite the poem with correct pauses.
v Draw children’s attention to the following.
1. That snake in the grass reported me to the
Headmistress.
Does ‘snake’ refer to a snake in the meadow/grass
or to a treacherous person who pretends to be a
friend? ‘A snake in the grass’ is an idiom.
2. ‘Snake’ can be used as a verb.
• The road snakes its way through the mountains.
(follows a twisting, winding course)
• The river snaked away into the distance.  (moving
like a snake, disappeared)
3. ‘snaky’ (like a snake)
• the snaky movements of the young dancers
• narrow snaky paths through the hill
112/HONEYCOMB
2020-21
FIRE: FRIEND AND FOE/113
     The Story of Cricket
v Games and sport — the story of cricket told in a historical
perspective, the continuity of the game down the ages
and its emergence as the most popular modern sport and
entertainment.
v Though the text is rather long and challenging, the content
is exciting enough to work well in class. Most children
know something about the game including names of
players/teams, and will show enthusiasm for the story
of cricket. Photographs given will enhance their interest
in the lesson.
v No time need be expended on memorisation/recall of
dates/years, names of places and clubs, measurements,
etc.  Additional sectioning of parts and designing of while-
reading comprehension checks, as suggested elsewhere,
will be of special use here.
v ‘Wordsearch’ clues to be explained at length before the
activity is attempted.  Another ‘Wordsearch’ for games-
related words and phrases can easily be prepared in class.
NOTES FOR THE TEACHER/113
2020-21
8
________________
________________
________________
________________
________________
smouldering:
burning slowly
without flame
________________
________________
________________
Before you read
Fire is both useful and dangerous. What  is fire?
How did we discover it? How do we control it?
                Fire: Friend and Foe
arly man didn’t know what fire was,
but he must have seen the damage it
could cause. He must have watched lightning and
volcanoes long before he began to use fire himself.
Fire was powerful and dangerous, and he
was frightened.
Fire may have puzzled early man but we now
know that fire is the result of a chemical reaction.
When the oxygen in the air combines with carbon
and hydrogen in a fuel, a chemical reaction takes
place. Energy in the form of heat and light is
released in this process. This is what we call fire.
Three things are needed to make fire — fuel,
oxygen and heat. Wood, coal, cooking gas and
petrol are some examples of fuel. Oxygen comes
from the air. That is why, when you blow on
smouldering paper, it often bursts into flame. The
third thing needed to make fire is heat. Fuel and
oxygen do not make fire by themselves, or else a
newspaper or a stick lying in the open would catch
fire on its own. To burn a piece of paper or wood,
E
2020-21
Page 5


N N N N NOTES OTES OTES OTES OTES     FOR FOR FOR FOR FOR     THE THE THE THE THE T T T T TEACHER EACHER EACHER EACHER EACHER
UNITS 8–10
   Fire: Friend and Foe
v Natural phenomenon—fire is both friend and enemy. An
informative piece about a potential hazard that can easily
be prevented.
v The point that the simple present tense signifies habitual
or repeated actions rather than the present time needs
reiteration and further practice. Build on Activity I under
‘Working with Language’ and design two or three
additional tasks. It will be interesting to show simple
present in contrast with present continuous.
• I walk to school every morning. Today I am taking a bus.
• W e have our morning assembly before the first hour, but
today we are attending a special programme instead on
health and hygiene.
v The writing activity, as after ‘The Ashes that Made Trees
Bloom’, is for further practice in language analysis.
v Read aloud the news item in the box at the end of the lesson.
Ask children to find other news items/headlines on a
specified theme. Display some on the class bulletin board.
Meadow Surprises
v Let children find pictures of a butterfly and other insects/
birds, a buttercup and other flowers that they know, a
rabbit and/or a running brook and arrange the pictures
in a patchwork design of their choice.
v Activity 4 can be taken up as a mini project. Involve groups
of children in doing it. The paragraph(s) or poem(s) written
at the end of the week may be put up on the class
bulletin board.
2020-21
112/HONEYCOMB
v Encourage children to share with their peers any
interesting ‘surprise’ that they may have come across.
A Bicycle in Good Repair
v Humour — exaggerated details of a commonplace
event (pleasure ride on a bicycle) that never takes
off, though numerous unexpected things happen
in the process.
v Short notes on modal auxiliaries are given preceding the
three exercises under ‘Working with Language’. These
may be suitably expanded, if necessary. However, the
skill to use modals appropriately in contexts should
receive primary focus in preference over out-of-context
explanations.
v Activity 4 on ‘en’ as prefix, suffix or as part of the word
should be completed in more than one session. One
period may be devoted to each part including
intermittent queries and explanations and the writing
work involved.
Garden Snake
v Recite the poem with correct pauses.
v Draw children’s attention to the following.
1. That snake in the grass reported me to the
Headmistress.
Does ‘snake’ refer to a snake in the meadow/grass
or to a treacherous person who pretends to be a
friend? ‘A snake in the grass’ is an idiom.
2. ‘Snake’ can be used as a verb.
• The road snakes its way through the mountains.
(follows a twisting, winding course)
• The river snaked away into the distance.  (moving
like a snake, disappeared)
3. ‘snaky’ (like a snake)
• the snaky movements of the young dancers
• narrow snaky paths through the hill
112/HONEYCOMB
2020-21
FIRE: FRIEND AND FOE/113
     The Story of Cricket
v Games and sport — the story of cricket told in a historical
perspective, the continuity of the game down the ages
and its emergence as the most popular modern sport and
entertainment.
v Though the text is rather long and challenging, the content
is exciting enough to work well in class. Most children
know something about the game including names of
players/teams, and will show enthusiasm for the story
of cricket. Photographs given will enhance their interest
in the lesson.
v No time need be expended on memorisation/recall of
dates/years, names of places and clubs, measurements,
etc.  Additional sectioning of parts and designing of while-
reading comprehension checks, as suggested elsewhere,
will be of special use here.
v ‘Wordsearch’ clues to be explained at length before the
activity is attempted.  Another ‘Wordsearch’ for games-
related words and phrases can easily be prepared in class.
NOTES FOR THE TEACHER/113
2020-21
8
________________
________________
________________
________________
________________
smouldering:
burning slowly
without flame
________________
________________
________________
Before you read
Fire is both useful and dangerous. What  is fire?
How did we discover it? How do we control it?
                Fire: Friend and Foe
arly man didn’t know what fire was,
but he must have seen the damage it
could cause. He must have watched lightning and
volcanoes long before he began to use fire himself.
Fire was powerful and dangerous, and he
was frightened.
Fire may have puzzled early man but we now
know that fire is the result of a chemical reaction.
When the oxygen in the air combines with carbon
and hydrogen in a fuel, a chemical reaction takes
place. Energy in the form of heat and light is
released in this process. This is what we call fire.
Three things are needed to make fire — fuel,
oxygen and heat. Wood, coal, cooking gas and
petrol are some examples of fuel. Oxygen comes
from the air. That is why, when you blow on
smouldering paper, it often bursts into flame. The
third thing needed to make fire is heat. Fuel and
oxygen do not make fire by themselves, or else a
newspaper or a stick lying in the open would catch
fire on its own. To burn a piece of paper or wood,
E
2020-21
FIRE: FRIEND AND FOE/115
we heat it before it catches fire. We generally do it
with a lighted match. Every fuel has a particular
temperature at which it begins to burn. This
temperature is called the ‘flash point’ or ‘kindling
temperature’ of the fuel.
It is sometimes said that fire is a good servant
but a bad master. It only means that fire is very
useful as long as it is kept under control.
For instance, we use it to cook our food, warm
our homes in winter and to generate electricity.
But, on the other hand, if fire gets out of control it
can be very dangerous. Each year thousands of
homes and shops are damaged by fire. Vast areas
of forest are also destroyed and hundreds of
people are killed or injured.
Just as three things are needed to start a
fire, there are three main ways in which a fire
can be put out. In each, one of the three things
needed for burning is taken away.
________________
________________
________________
________________
________________
________________
generate:
produce
________________
________________
________________
________________
________________
________________
________________
_______________
2020-21
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