NCERT Textbook - Confrontation of Cultures Humanities/Arts Notes | EduRev

History Class 11

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Humanities/Arts : NCERT Textbook - Confrontation of Cultures Humanities/Arts Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


168  THEMES IN WORLD HISTORY
CONFRONTATION OF
CULTURES
THIS chapter will examine some aspects of the encounters
between Europeans and the people of the Americas between
the fifteenth and the seventeenth centuries. Some Europeans
ventured out on unknown oceans in order to find trading
routes to areas where spices and silver were to be obtained.
The first to do this were the Spanish and the Portuguese.
They persuaded the Pope to give them the exclusive right to
rule over any new regions they might locate. Christopher
Columbus, an Italian, sponsored by the rulers of Spain, sailed
west in 1492, and thought that the lands he had reached
were ‘the Indies’ (India and countries east of India about
which he had read in the Travels of Marco Polo).
Later exploration indicated that the ‘Indians’ of the ‘New
World’ actually belonged to different cultural groups and were
not part of Asia. Two types of culture were to be found in the
Americas. There were small subsistence economies in the
Caribbean region and in Brazil. There were also powerful
monarchical systems based on well-developed agriculture and
mining. These, like the Aztecs and Mayas of central America
and the Incas of Peru, also had monumental architecture.
The exploration and later the settlement of South America
were to have disastrous consequences for the native people
and their cultures. It also marked the beginning of the slave
trade, with Europeans selling slaves from Africa to work in
plantations and mines in the Americas.
European conquest of the people of America was
accompanied by the ruthless destruction of their manuscripts
and monuments. It was only in the late nineteenth century
that anthropologists began to study these cultures. Still later,
archaeologists found the ruins of these civilisations. The Inca
city of Machu Picchu was rediscovered in 1911. Recently,
photographs taken from the air have shown traces of many
cities now covered by forest.
By contrast, we know the European side of the encounters
in great detail. The Europeans who went to the Americas
kept log-books and diaries of their journeys. There are records
left by officials and Jesuit missionaries (see Theme 7).
Europeans wrote about their ‘discovery’ of the Americas, and
when histories of the countries of America were written, these
were in terms of European settlements, with little reference
to the local people.
THEME
8
© NCERT
not to be republished
Page 2


168  THEMES IN WORLD HISTORY
CONFRONTATION OF
CULTURES
THIS chapter will examine some aspects of the encounters
between Europeans and the people of the Americas between
the fifteenth and the seventeenth centuries. Some Europeans
ventured out on unknown oceans in order to find trading
routes to areas where spices and silver were to be obtained.
The first to do this were the Spanish and the Portuguese.
They persuaded the Pope to give them the exclusive right to
rule over any new regions they might locate. Christopher
Columbus, an Italian, sponsored by the rulers of Spain, sailed
west in 1492, and thought that the lands he had reached
were ‘the Indies’ (India and countries east of India about
which he had read in the Travels of Marco Polo).
Later exploration indicated that the ‘Indians’ of the ‘New
World’ actually belonged to different cultural groups and were
not part of Asia. Two types of culture were to be found in the
Americas. There were small subsistence economies in the
Caribbean region and in Brazil. There were also powerful
monarchical systems based on well-developed agriculture and
mining. These, like the Aztecs and Mayas of central America
and the Incas of Peru, also had monumental architecture.
The exploration and later the settlement of South America
were to have disastrous consequences for the native people
and their cultures. It also marked the beginning of the slave
trade, with Europeans selling slaves from Africa to work in
plantations and mines in the Americas.
European conquest of the people of America was
accompanied by the ruthless destruction of their manuscripts
and monuments. It was only in the late nineteenth century
that anthropologists began to study these cultures. Still later,
archaeologists found the ruins of these civilisations. The Inca
city of Machu Picchu was rediscovered in 1911. Recently,
photographs taken from the air have shown traces of many
cities now covered by forest.
By contrast, we know the European side of the encounters
in great detail. The Europeans who went to the Americas
kept log-books and diaries of their journeys. There are records
left by officials and Jesuit missionaries (see Theme 7).
Europeans wrote about their ‘discovery’ of the Americas, and
when histories of the countries of America were written, these
were in terms of European settlements, with little reference
to the local people.
THEME
8
© NCERT
not to be republished
  169
People have been living in North and South America and nearby islands
for thousands of years, and many migrations from Asia and from the
South Sea Islands have taken place over time. South America was (and
still is, in parts) densely forested and mountainous, and the Amazon,
the world’s largest river, flows through miles of dense forest. In Mexico
in central America, there were densely settled areas of habitation along
the coast and in the plains, while elsewhere villages were scattered over
forested areas.
Communities of the Caribbean and Brazil
The Arawakian Lucayos lived on a cluster of hundreds of small islands
in the Caribbean Sea, today known as the Bahamas, and the Greater
Antilles. They had been expelled from the Lesser Antilles by the Caribs,
a fierce tribe. In contrast to them, the Arawaks were a people who
preferred negotiation to conflict. Skilled boat-builders, they sailed the
open sea in dugout canoes (canoes made from hollow tree trunks). They
lived by hunting, fishing and agriculture, growing corn, sweet potatoes,
tubers and cassava.
A central cultural value was the organisation of people to produce
food collectively and to feed everyone in the community. They were
organised under clan elders. Polygamy was common. The Arawaks
were animists. As in many other societies, shamans played an
important role as healers and intermediaries between this world and
that of the supernatural.
MAP 1: Central
America and the
Caribbean Islands
Animists believe
that even objects
regarded by
modern science as
‘inanimate’ may
have life or a soul.
 CONFRONTATION OF CULTURES
© NCERT
not to be republished
Page 3


168  THEMES IN WORLD HISTORY
CONFRONTATION OF
CULTURES
THIS chapter will examine some aspects of the encounters
between Europeans and the people of the Americas between
the fifteenth and the seventeenth centuries. Some Europeans
ventured out on unknown oceans in order to find trading
routes to areas where spices and silver were to be obtained.
The first to do this were the Spanish and the Portuguese.
They persuaded the Pope to give them the exclusive right to
rule over any new regions they might locate. Christopher
Columbus, an Italian, sponsored by the rulers of Spain, sailed
west in 1492, and thought that the lands he had reached
were ‘the Indies’ (India and countries east of India about
which he had read in the Travels of Marco Polo).
Later exploration indicated that the ‘Indians’ of the ‘New
World’ actually belonged to different cultural groups and were
not part of Asia. Two types of culture were to be found in the
Americas. There were small subsistence economies in the
Caribbean region and in Brazil. There were also powerful
monarchical systems based on well-developed agriculture and
mining. These, like the Aztecs and Mayas of central America
and the Incas of Peru, also had monumental architecture.
The exploration and later the settlement of South America
were to have disastrous consequences for the native people
and their cultures. It also marked the beginning of the slave
trade, with Europeans selling slaves from Africa to work in
plantations and mines in the Americas.
European conquest of the people of America was
accompanied by the ruthless destruction of their manuscripts
and monuments. It was only in the late nineteenth century
that anthropologists began to study these cultures. Still later,
archaeologists found the ruins of these civilisations. The Inca
city of Machu Picchu was rediscovered in 1911. Recently,
photographs taken from the air have shown traces of many
cities now covered by forest.
By contrast, we know the European side of the encounters
in great detail. The Europeans who went to the Americas
kept log-books and diaries of their journeys. There are records
left by officials and Jesuit missionaries (see Theme 7).
Europeans wrote about their ‘discovery’ of the Americas, and
when histories of the countries of America were written, these
were in terms of European settlements, with little reference
to the local people.
THEME
8
© NCERT
not to be republished
  169
People have been living in North and South America and nearby islands
for thousands of years, and many migrations from Asia and from the
South Sea Islands have taken place over time. South America was (and
still is, in parts) densely forested and mountainous, and the Amazon,
the world’s largest river, flows through miles of dense forest. In Mexico
in central America, there were densely settled areas of habitation along
the coast and in the plains, while elsewhere villages were scattered over
forested areas.
Communities of the Caribbean and Brazil
The Arawakian Lucayos lived on a cluster of hundreds of small islands
in the Caribbean Sea, today known as the Bahamas, and the Greater
Antilles. They had been expelled from the Lesser Antilles by the Caribs,
a fierce tribe. In contrast to them, the Arawaks were a people who
preferred negotiation to conflict. Skilled boat-builders, they sailed the
open sea in dugout canoes (canoes made from hollow tree trunks). They
lived by hunting, fishing and agriculture, growing corn, sweet potatoes,
tubers and cassava.
A central cultural value was the organisation of people to produce
food collectively and to feed everyone in the community. They were
organised under clan elders. Polygamy was common. The Arawaks
were animists. As in many other societies, shamans played an
important role as healers and intermediaries between this world and
that of the supernatural.
MAP 1: Central
America and the
Caribbean Islands
Animists believe
that even objects
regarded by
modern science as
‘inanimate’ may
have life or a soul.
 CONFRONTATION OF CULTURES
© NCERT
not to be republished
170  THEMES IN WORLD HISTORY
The Arawaks used gold for ornaments, but did not attach the value
to the metal that the Europeans did. They were quite happy to exchange
gold for glass beads brought by the Europeans, because these seemed
so much more beautiful. The art of weaving was highly developed – the
hammock was one of their specialities, and one which captured the
imagination of the Europeans.
The Arawaks were generous and were happy to collaborate with the
Spanish in their search for gold. It was when Spanish policy became
brutal that they were forced to resist, but this was to have disastrous
consequences for them. Within twenty-five years of contact with the
Spanish very little remained of the Arawaks or their way of life.
People called the Tupinamba lived on the east coast of South America,
and in villages in the forests (the name ‘Brazil’ is derived from the
brazilwood tree). They could not clear the dense forests for cultivation
as they had no access to iron. But they had a healthy and plentiful
supply of fruits, vegetables and fish, and so did not have to depend on
agriculture. The Europeans who met them envied their happy freedom,
with no king, army or church to regulate their lives.
The State Systems of Central and South America
In contrast to the Caribbean and Brazil, there were some highly organised
states in central America. There was a generous surplus of corn, which
provided the basis for the urbanised civilisations of the Aztecs, Mayas and
Incas. The monumental architectural remains of these cities continue to
mesmerise visitors today.
The Aztecs
In the twelfth century, the Aztecs had migrated from the north into
the central valley of Mexico (named after their god Mexitli). They
expanded their empire by defeating different tribes, who were forced
to pay tribute.
Aztec society was hierarchical. The nobility included
those who were nobles by birth, priests, and others
who had been awarded the rank. The hereditary
nobility were a small minority who occupied the
senior positions in the government, the army and
the priesthood. The nobles chose from among
them a supreme leader who ruled until his death.
The king was regarded as the representative of
the sun on earth. Warriors, priests and nobles
were the most respected groups, but traders also
enjoyed many privileges and often served
the government as ambassadors and spies.
Talented artisans, physicians and wise teachers were
also respected.
ACTIVITY 1
Discuss the
differences
between the
Arawaks and the
Spanish. Which
of these
differences
would you
consider most
significant and
why?
A ball-court marker,
with inscribed dates,
Maya culture,
Chiapas, sixth
century.
© NCERT
not to be republished
Page 4


168  THEMES IN WORLD HISTORY
CONFRONTATION OF
CULTURES
THIS chapter will examine some aspects of the encounters
between Europeans and the people of the Americas between
the fifteenth and the seventeenth centuries. Some Europeans
ventured out on unknown oceans in order to find trading
routes to areas where spices and silver were to be obtained.
The first to do this were the Spanish and the Portuguese.
They persuaded the Pope to give them the exclusive right to
rule over any new regions they might locate. Christopher
Columbus, an Italian, sponsored by the rulers of Spain, sailed
west in 1492, and thought that the lands he had reached
were ‘the Indies’ (India and countries east of India about
which he had read in the Travels of Marco Polo).
Later exploration indicated that the ‘Indians’ of the ‘New
World’ actually belonged to different cultural groups and were
not part of Asia. Two types of culture were to be found in the
Americas. There were small subsistence economies in the
Caribbean region and in Brazil. There were also powerful
monarchical systems based on well-developed agriculture and
mining. These, like the Aztecs and Mayas of central America
and the Incas of Peru, also had monumental architecture.
The exploration and later the settlement of South America
were to have disastrous consequences for the native people
and their cultures. It also marked the beginning of the slave
trade, with Europeans selling slaves from Africa to work in
plantations and mines in the Americas.
European conquest of the people of America was
accompanied by the ruthless destruction of their manuscripts
and monuments. It was only in the late nineteenth century
that anthropologists began to study these cultures. Still later,
archaeologists found the ruins of these civilisations. The Inca
city of Machu Picchu was rediscovered in 1911. Recently,
photographs taken from the air have shown traces of many
cities now covered by forest.
By contrast, we know the European side of the encounters
in great detail. The Europeans who went to the Americas
kept log-books and diaries of their journeys. There are records
left by officials and Jesuit missionaries (see Theme 7).
Europeans wrote about their ‘discovery’ of the Americas, and
when histories of the countries of America were written, these
were in terms of European settlements, with little reference
to the local people.
THEME
8
© NCERT
not to be republished
  169
People have been living in North and South America and nearby islands
for thousands of years, and many migrations from Asia and from the
South Sea Islands have taken place over time. South America was (and
still is, in parts) densely forested and mountainous, and the Amazon,
the world’s largest river, flows through miles of dense forest. In Mexico
in central America, there were densely settled areas of habitation along
the coast and in the plains, while elsewhere villages were scattered over
forested areas.
Communities of the Caribbean and Brazil
The Arawakian Lucayos lived on a cluster of hundreds of small islands
in the Caribbean Sea, today known as the Bahamas, and the Greater
Antilles. They had been expelled from the Lesser Antilles by the Caribs,
a fierce tribe. In contrast to them, the Arawaks were a people who
preferred negotiation to conflict. Skilled boat-builders, they sailed the
open sea in dugout canoes (canoes made from hollow tree trunks). They
lived by hunting, fishing and agriculture, growing corn, sweet potatoes,
tubers and cassava.
A central cultural value was the organisation of people to produce
food collectively and to feed everyone in the community. They were
organised under clan elders. Polygamy was common. The Arawaks
were animists. As in many other societies, shamans played an
important role as healers and intermediaries between this world and
that of the supernatural.
MAP 1: Central
America and the
Caribbean Islands
Animists believe
that even objects
regarded by
modern science as
‘inanimate’ may
have life or a soul.
 CONFRONTATION OF CULTURES
© NCERT
not to be republished
170  THEMES IN WORLD HISTORY
The Arawaks used gold for ornaments, but did not attach the value
to the metal that the Europeans did. They were quite happy to exchange
gold for glass beads brought by the Europeans, because these seemed
so much more beautiful. The art of weaving was highly developed – the
hammock was one of their specialities, and one which captured the
imagination of the Europeans.
The Arawaks were generous and were happy to collaborate with the
Spanish in their search for gold. It was when Spanish policy became
brutal that they were forced to resist, but this was to have disastrous
consequences for them. Within twenty-five years of contact with the
Spanish very little remained of the Arawaks or their way of life.
People called the Tupinamba lived on the east coast of South America,
and in villages in the forests (the name ‘Brazil’ is derived from the
brazilwood tree). They could not clear the dense forests for cultivation
as they had no access to iron. But they had a healthy and plentiful
supply of fruits, vegetables and fish, and so did not have to depend on
agriculture. The Europeans who met them envied their happy freedom,
with no king, army or church to regulate their lives.
The State Systems of Central and South America
In contrast to the Caribbean and Brazil, there were some highly organised
states in central America. There was a generous surplus of corn, which
provided the basis for the urbanised civilisations of the Aztecs, Mayas and
Incas. The monumental architectural remains of these cities continue to
mesmerise visitors today.
The Aztecs
In the twelfth century, the Aztecs had migrated from the north into
the central valley of Mexico (named after their god Mexitli). They
expanded their empire by defeating different tribes, who were forced
to pay tribute.
Aztec society was hierarchical. The nobility included
those who were nobles by birth, priests, and others
who had been awarded the rank. The hereditary
nobility were a small minority who occupied the
senior positions in the government, the army and
the priesthood. The nobles chose from among
them a supreme leader who ruled until his death.
The king was regarded as the representative of
the sun on earth. Warriors, priests and nobles
were the most respected groups, but traders also
enjoyed many privileges and often served
the government as ambassadors and spies.
Talented artisans, physicians and wise teachers were
also respected.
ACTIVITY 1
Discuss the
differences
between the
Arawaks and the
Spanish. Which
of these
differences
would you
consider most
significant and
why?
A ball-court marker,
with inscribed dates,
Maya culture,
Chiapas, sixth
century.
© NCERT
not to be republished
  171
Since land was limited, the Aztecs undertook reclamations. They
made chinampas, artificial islands, in Lake Mexico, by weaving huge
reed-mats and covering them with mud and plants. Between these
exceptionally fertile islands, canals were constructed on which, in 1325,
was built the capital city Tenochtitlan. Its palaces and pyramids rose
dramatically out of the lake. Because the Aztecs were frequently engaged
in war, the most impressive temples were dedicated to the gods of war
and the sun.
The empire rested on a rural base. People cultivated corn, beans,
squash, pumpkins, manioc root, potatoes and other crops. Land was
owned not by individuals but by clans, which also organised public
construction works. Peasants, like European serfs, were attached to
lands owned by the nobility and cultivated them in exchange for part
of the harvest. The poor would sometimes sell their children as slaves,
but this was usually only for a limited period, and slaves could buy
back their freedom.
The Aztecs made sure that all children went to school. Children of
the nobility attended the calmecac and were trained to become military
and religious leaders. All others went to the tepochcalli in
their neighbourhood, where they learned history,
myths, religion and ceremonial songs. Boys received
military training as well as training in agriculture and
the trades. Girls were trained in domestic skills.
In the early sixteenth century, the Aztec empire
was showing signs of strain. This was largely to do
with discontent among recently conquered peoples
who were looking for opportunities to break free from
central control.
The Mayas
The Mayan culture of Mexico
developed remarkably between
the eleventh and fourteenth
centuries, but in the sixteenth
century they had less political
power than the Aztecs. Corn
cultivation was central to their
culture, and many religious
ceremonies were centred on the
planting, growing and harvesting of
corn. Efficient agricultural production
generated surplus, which helped the ruling
classes, priests and chiefs to invest in architecture
and in the development of astronomy and
mathematics. The Mayas devised a pictographic form of
writing that has only been partially deciphered.
Reclamation is the
conversion of
wasteland into land
suitable for
habitation or
cultivation.
Maya temple, Tikal,
Guatemala, eighth
century.
 CONFRONTATION OF CULTURES
© NCERT
not to be republished
Page 5


168  THEMES IN WORLD HISTORY
CONFRONTATION OF
CULTURES
THIS chapter will examine some aspects of the encounters
between Europeans and the people of the Americas between
the fifteenth and the seventeenth centuries. Some Europeans
ventured out on unknown oceans in order to find trading
routes to areas where spices and silver were to be obtained.
The first to do this were the Spanish and the Portuguese.
They persuaded the Pope to give them the exclusive right to
rule over any new regions they might locate. Christopher
Columbus, an Italian, sponsored by the rulers of Spain, sailed
west in 1492, and thought that the lands he had reached
were ‘the Indies’ (India and countries east of India about
which he had read in the Travels of Marco Polo).
Later exploration indicated that the ‘Indians’ of the ‘New
World’ actually belonged to different cultural groups and were
not part of Asia. Two types of culture were to be found in the
Americas. There were small subsistence economies in the
Caribbean region and in Brazil. There were also powerful
monarchical systems based on well-developed agriculture and
mining. These, like the Aztecs and Mayas of central America
and the Incas of Peru, also had monumental architecture.
The exploration and later the settlement of South America
were to have disastrous consequences for the native people
and their cultures. It also marked the beginning of the slave
trade, with Europeans selling slaves from Africa to work in
plantations and mines in the Americas.
European conquest of the people of America was
accompanied by the ruthless destruction of their manuscripts
and monuments. It was only in the late nineteenth century
that anthropologists began to study these cultures. Still later,
archaeologists found the ruins of these civilisations. The Inca
city of Machu Picchu was rediscovered in 1911. Recently,
photographs taken from the air have shown traces of many
cities now covered by forest.
By contrast, we know the European side of the encounters
in great detail. The Europeans who went to the Americas
kept log-books and diaries of their journeys. There are records
left by officials and Jesuit missionaries (see Theme 7).
Europeans wrote about their ‘discovery’ of the Americas, and
when histories of the countries of America were written, these
were in terms of European settlements, with little reference
to the local people.
THEME
8
© NCERT
not to be republished
  169
People have been living in North and South America and nearby islands
for thousands of years, and many migrations from Asia and from the
South Sea Islands have taken place over time. South America was (and
still is, in parts) densely forested and mountainous, and the Amazon,
the world’s largest river, flows through miles of dense forest. In Mexico
in central America, there were densely settled areas of habitation along
the coast and in the plains, while elsewhere villages were scattered over
forested areas.
Communities of the Caribbean and Brazil
The Arawakian Lucayos lived on a cluster of hundreds of small islands
in the Caribbean Sea, today known as the Bahamas, and the Greater
Antilles. They had been expelled from the Lesser Antilles by the Caribs,
a fierce tribe. In contrast to them, the Arawaks were a people who
preferred negotiation to conflict. Skilled boat-builders, they sailed the
open sea in dugout canoes (canoes made from hollow tree trunks). They
lived by hunting, fishing and agriculture, growing corn, sweet potatoes,
tubers and cassava.
A central cultural value was the organisation of people to produce
food collectively and to feed everyone in the community. They were
organised under clan elders. Polygamy was common. The Arawaks
were animists. As in many other societies, shamans played an
important role as healers and intermediaries between this world and
that of the supernatural.
MAP 1: Central
America and the
Caribbean Islands
Animists believe
that even objects
regarded by
modern science as
‘inanimate’ may
have life or a soul.
 CONFRONTATION OF CULTURES
© NCERT
not to be republished
170  THEMES IN WORLD HISTORY
The Arawaks used gold for ornaments, but did not attach the value
to the metal that the Europeans did. They were quite happy to exchange
gold for glass beads brought by the Europeans, because these seemed
so much more beautiful. The art of weaving was highly developed – the
hammock was one of their specialities, and one which captured the
imagination of the Europeans.
The Arawaks were generous and were happy to collaborate with the
Spanish in their search for gold. It was when Spanish policy became
brutal that they were forced to resist, but this was to have disastrous
consequences for them. Within twenty-five years of contact with the
Spanish very little remained of the Arawaks or their way of life.
People called the Tupinamba lived on the east coast of South America,
and in villages in the forests (the name ‘Brazil’ is derived from the
brazilwood tree). They could not clear the dense forests for cultivation
as they had no access to iron. But they had a healthy and plentiful
supply of fruits, vegetables and fish, and so did not have to depend on
agriculture. The Europeans who met them envied their happy freedom,
with no king, army or church to regulate their lives.
The State Systems of Central and South America
In contrast to the Caribbean and Brazil, there were some highly organised
states in central America. There was a generous surplus of corn, which
provided the basis for the urbanised civilisations of the Aztecs, Mayas and
Incas. The monumental architectural remains of these cities continue to
mesmerise visitors today.
The Aztecs
In the twelfth century, the Aztecs had migrated from the north into
the central valley of Mexico (named after their god Mexitli). They
expanded their empire by defeating different tribes, who were forced
to pay tribute.
Aztec society was hierarchical. The nobility included
those who were nobles by birth, priests, and others
who had been awarded the rank. The hereditary
nobility were a small minority who occupied the
senior positions in the government, the army and
the priesthood. The nobles chose from among
them a supreme leader who ruled until his death.
The king was regarded as the representative of
the sun on earth. Warriors, priests and nobles
were the most respected groups, but traders also
enjoyed many privileges and often served
the government as ambassadors and spies.
Talented artisans, physicians and wise teachers were
also respected.
ACTIVITY 1
Discuss the
differences
between the
Arawaks and the
Spanish. Which
of these
differences
would you
consider most
significant and
why?
A ball-court marker,
with inscribed dates,
Maya culture,
Chiapas, sixth
century.
© NCERT
not to be republished
  171
Since land was limited, the Aztecs undertook reclamations. They
made chinampas, artificial islands, in Lake Mexico, by weaving huge
reed-mats and covering them with mud and plants. Between these
exceptionally fertile islands, canals were constructed on which, in 1325,
was built the capital city Tenochtitlan. Its palaces and pyramids rose
dramatically out of the lake. Because the Aztecs were frequently engaged
in war, the most impressive temples were dedicated to the gods of war
and the sun.
The empire rested on a rural base. People cultivated corn, beans,
squash, pumpkins, manioc root, potatoes and other crops. Land was
owned not by individuals but by clans, which also organised public
construction works. Peasants, like European serfs, were attached to
lands owned by the nobility and cultivated them in exchange for part
of the harvest. The poor would sometimes sell their children as slaves,
but this was usually only for a limited period, and slaves could buy
back their freedom.
The Aztecs made sure that all children went to school. Children of
the nobility attended the calmecac and were trained to become military
and religious leaders. All others went to the tepochcalli in
their neighbourhood, where they learned history,
myths, religion and ceremonial songs. Boys received
military training as well as training in agriculture and
the trades. Girls were trained in domestic skills.
In the early sixteenth century, the Aztec empire
was showing signs of strain. This was largely to do
with discontent among recently conquered peoples
who were looking for opportunities to break free from
central control.
The Mayas
The Mayan culture of Mexico
developed remarkably between
the eleventh and fourteenth
centuries, but in the sixteenth
century they had less political
power than the Aztecs. Corn
cultivation was central to their
culture, and many religious
ceremonies were centred on the
planting, growing and harvesting of
corn. Efficient agricultural production
generated surplus, which helped the ruling
classes, priests and chiefs to invest in architecture
and in the development of astronomy and
mathematics. The Mayas devised a pictographic form of
writing that has only been partially deciphered.
Reclamation is the
conversion of
wasteland into land
suitable for
habitation or
cultivation.
Maya temple, Tikal,
Guatemala, eighth
century.
 CONFRONTATION OF CULTURES
© NCERT
not to be republished
172  THEMES IN WORLD HISTORY
The Incas of Peru
The largest of the indigenous civilisations in South America was that
of the Quechuas or Incas in Peru. In the twelfth century the first Inca,
Manco Capac, established his capital at Cuzco. Expansion began under
the ninth Inca and at its maximum extent the Inca empire stretched
3,000 miles from Ecuador to Chile.
The empire was highly centralised, with the king representing the
highest source of authority. Newly conquered tribes were absorbed
effectively; every subject was required to speak Quechua, the language
of the court. Each tribe was ruled independently by a council of elders,
but the tribe as a whole owed its allegiance to the ruler. At the same
time, local rulers were rewarded for their military co-operation. Thus,
like the Aztec empire, the Inca empire resembled a confederacy, with the
Incas in control. There are no precise figures of the population, but it
would seem that it included over a million people.
Like the Aztecs, the Incas too were magnificent builders. They
built roads through mountains from Ecuador to Chile. Their forts
were built of stone slabs that were so
perfectly cut that they did not require
mortar. They used labour-intensive
technology to carve and move stones from
nearby rock falls. Masons shaped the
blocks, using an effective but simple
method called flaking. Many stones
weighed more than 100 metric tons, but
they did not have any wheeled vehicles
to transport these. Labour was organised
and very tightly managed.
The basis of the Inca civilisation was
agriculture. To cope with the infertile soil
conditions, they terraced hillsides and
developed systems of drainage and
irrigation. It has been recently pointed
out that in 1500, cultivation in the
Andean highlands was much greater than
what it is today. The Incas grew corn and
potatoes, and reared llamas for food and
labour.
Their weaving and pottery were of a high
quality. They did not develop a system of
writing. However, there was an accounting
system in place – the quipu, or cords upon
which knots were made to indicate specific
mathematical units. Some scholars now
suggest that the Incas wove a sort of code
into these threads.
MAP 2: South America
© NCERT
not to be republished
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