NCERT Textbook - Three Questions Class 7 Notes | EduRev

English Honeycomb Class 7

Class 7 : NCERT Textbook - Three Questions Class 7 Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


NOTES FOR THE TEACHER
General
v Learning a language means using it for a wide variety of
purposes. Language is best acquired when attention is
focused on meaning, not on form.
v Words and phrases not closely related to objects and
action remain empty and lifeless to young learners.
Language comes alive when presented in meaning-making
contexts.
v Words/phrases that are used to accomplish many useful
purposes follow a certain system inherent in the language
itself.
v Learners become familiar with the system through
continuous exposure to the language in meaning-focused
situations.
v Interaction, discussion and sharing of ideas among
learners provide opportunities that elicit ‘real’ information
about them and their experiences and opinions.
v Encourage learners to work in pairs and small groups
and let them go beyond the textbook by providing a
variety of language inputs for spontaneous and natural
use of language.
v Build on the exercises given in the textbook and design
more tasks/activities in keeping with learners’ interests,
needs and surroundings.  Employ free-response exercises
(with more than one possible response).
v Promote reading habits through story-reading (not
merely teaching stories as texts), story-retelling, choral
reading, shared reading, etc.
v Create class libraries for exchange of books and shared
reading.  The library may also move with children to the
next higher class.
2020-21
Page 2


NOTES FOR THE TEACHER
General
v Learning a language means using it for a wide variety of
purposes. Language is best acquired when attention is
focused on meaning, not on form.
v Words and phrases not closely related to objects and
action remain empty and lifeless to young learners.
Language comes alive when presented in meaning-making
contexts.
v Words/phrases that are used to accomplish many useful
purposes follow a certain system inherent in the language
itself.
v Learners become familiar with the system through
continuous exposure to the language in meaning-focused
situations.
v Interaction, discussion and sharing of ideas among
learners provide opportunities that elicit ‘real’ information
about them and their experiences and opinions.
v Encourage learners to work in pairs and small groups
and let them go beyond the textbook by providing a
variety of language inputs for spontaneous and natural
use of language.
v Build on the exercises given in the textbook and design
more tasks/activities in keeping with learners’ interests,
needs and surroundings.  Employ free-response exercises
(with more than one possible response).
v Promote reading habits through story-reading (not
merely teaching stories as texts), story-retelling, choral
reading, shared reading, etc.
v Create class libraries for exchange of books and shared
reading.  The library may also move with children to the
next higher class.
2020-21
2/HONEYCOMB
v Introduce advertisement as a genre and discuss with the
learners about advertisements on social concerns such
as educating the girl child, protecting the environment,
saving water.
v Poems need not be taught line by line, word by word.
You may give a model reading but let every child read
the poem on her/his own to feel the richness of language,
rhythm and music of words. Exercises accompanying the
poem are more for understanding the poem as a whole
than for teaching language items.
v Encourage learners to tell new stories, narrate  anecdotes,
compose short poems in English or their own language,
talk about pictures, illustrations in the book and cartoons
in newspapers/magazines. Don’t get anxious about the
errors they will make. Constant exposure, practice and
correction in the form of feedback will help them improve
themselves by and by.
v Every page has a column for words and meanings.
Encourage children to write down other words they  find
difficult, along with their meanings, in this column.
UNITS 1–3
Three Questions
Some suggestions given below are applicable to all prose
lessons in the book.
v A Tolstoy story — the three questions in the opening
paragraph, though philosophical in nature, may be of
practical significance to individuals in self-realisation and
value inculcation.
v Spend about 10 minutes discussing the questions the
king asks. Let children express their views.  Even if their
observations do not reveal any understanding of the
questions, the discussion session will provide an excellent
base for the work to follow.
v The story is sectioned in two parts.  Each part may be sectioned
further according to convenience and time available.
v ‘Comprehension Check’ at the end of each section is a
recall of what they have read so far.  Design while-reading
comprehension exercises in the form of factual
2/HONEYCOMB
2020-21
Page 3


NOTES FOR THE TEACHER
General
v Learning a language means using it for a wide variety of
purposes. Language is best acquired when attention is
focused on meaning, not on form.
v Words and phrases not closely related to objects and
action remain empty and lifeless to young learners.
Language comes alive when presented in meaning-making
contexts.
v Words/phrases that are used to accomplish many useful
purposes follow a certain system inherent in the language
itself.
v Learners become familiar with the system through
continuous exposure to the language in meaning-focused
situations.
v Interaction, discussion and sharing of ideas among
learners provide opportunities that elicit ‘real’ information
about them and their experiences and opinions.
v Encourage learners to work in pairs and small groups
and let them go beyond the textbook by providing a
variety of language inputs for spontaneous and natural
use of language.
v Build on the exercises given in the textbook and design
more tasks/activities in keeping with learners’ interests,
needs and surroundings.  Employ free-response exercises
(with more than one possible response).
v Promote reading habits through story-reading (not
merely teaching stories as texts), story-retelling, choral
reading, shared reading, etc.
v Create class libraries for exchange of books and shared
reading.  The library may also move with children to the
next higher class.
2020-21
2/HONEYCOMB
v Introduce advertisement as a genre and discuss with the
learners about advertisements on social concerns such
as educating the girl child, protecting the environment,
saving water.
v Poems need not be taught line by line, word by word.
You may give a model reading but let every child read
the poem on her/his own to feel the richness of language,
rhythm and music of words. Exercises accompanying the
poem are more for understanding the poem as a whole
than for teaching language items.
v Encourage learners to tell new stories, narrate  anecdotes,
compose short poems in English or their own language,
talk about pictures, illustrations in the book and cartoons
in newspapers/magazines. Don’t get anxious about the
errors they will make. Constant exposure, practice and
correction in the form of feedback will help them improve
themselves by and by.
v Every page has a column for words and meanings.
Encourage children to write down other words they  find
difficult, along with their meanings, in this column.
UNITS 1–3
Three Questions
Some suggestions given below are applicable to all prose
lessons in the book.
v A Tolstoy story — the three questions in the opening
paragraph, though philosophical in nature, may be of
practical significance to individuals in self-realisation and
value inculcation.
v Spend about 10 minutes discussing the questions the
king asks. Let children express their views.  Even if their
observations do not reveal any understanding of the
questions, the discussion session will provide an excellent
base for the work to follow.
v The story is sectioned in two parts.  Each part may be sectioned
further according to convenience and time available.
v ‘Comprehension Check’ at the end of each section is a
recall of what they have read so far.  Design while-reading
comprehension exercises in the form of factual
2/HONEYCOMB
2020-21
THREE QUESTIONS/3
comprehension questions, multiple choice questions
and/or completion of sentences, etc.
v While covering portions of the text, either talk about the
illustrations or ask children to tell you about them.
Illustrations are there not merely for decoration but mainly
for comprehension.
v Questions under ‘Working with the Text’ to be answered
orally, later to be written in the copybook.
v At the end of the lesson, draw children’s attention to the
three questions in the context of the present period/class.
Isn’t the present period the right time to do as best
you can the task in hand jointly with the member(s)  of
the group for her/his good  and your own ?
The Squirrel
v Drawing a squirrel or finding the picture of a squirrel
and describing it variously will commit learners’ interest
to the poem they are reading.
v Help them find ‘wear’ and its usage in the dictionary.
Avoid fixed phrases like ‘wear and tear’ or ‘wear one’s
heart on one’s sleeve’, etc. Draw their attention to sentences
like the following.
• She wore  a plain dress but an enigmatic smile.
• Should a man wear a lady’s perfume ?
v The illustration given in the book may generate comments
such as the following.
• The squirrel’s tail looks like a question mark.
• It reminds me of the mark of punctuation that comes
at the end of an interrogative sentence.
• Looking at this squirrel, you might say it was asking
a question.  What is the question ?
• The squirrel is wearing a long overcoat reaching the
tip of its tail.
• If it begins to run now, its tail will look like the bushy
end of a painter’s brush.
NOTES FOR THE TEACHER/3
2020-21
Page 4


NOTES FOR THE TEACHER
General
v Learning a language means using it for a wide variety of
purposes. Language is best acquired when attention is
focused on meaning, not on form.
v Words and phrases not closely related to objects and
action remain empty and lifeless to young learners.
Language comes alive when presented in meaning-making
contexts.
v Words/phrases that are used to accomplish many useful
purposes follow a certain system inherent in the language
itself.
v Learners become familiar with the system through
continuous exposure to the language in meaning-focused
situations.
v Interaction, discussion and sharing of ideas among
learners provide opportunities that elicit ‘real’ information
about them and their experiences and opinions.
v Encourage learners to work in pairs and small groups
and let them go beyond the textbook by providing a
variety of language inputs for spontaneous and natural
use of language.
v Build on the exercises given in the textbook and design
more tasks/activities in keeping with learners’ interests,
needs and surroundings.  Employ free-response exercises
(with more than one possible response).
v Promote reading habits through story-reading (not
merely teaching stories as texts), story-retelling, choral
reading, shared reading, etc.
v Create class libraries for exchange of books and shared
reading.  The library may also move with children to the
next higher class.
2020-21
2/HONEYCOMB
v Introduce advertisement as a genre and discuss with the
learners about advertisements on social concerns such
as educating the girl child, protecting the environment,
saving water.
v Poems need not be taught line by line, word by word.
You may give a model reading but let every child read
the poem on her/his own to feel the richness of language,
rhythm and music of words. Exercises accompanying the
poem are more for understanding the poem as a whole
than for teaching language items.
v Encourage learners to tell new stories, narrate  anecdotes,
compose short poems in English or their own language,
talk about pictures, illustrations in the book and cartoons
in newspapers/magazines. Don’t get anxious about the
errors they will make. Constant exposure, practice and
correction in the form of feedback will help them improve
themselves by and by.
v Every page has a column for words and meanings.
Encourage children to write down other words they  find
difficult, along with their meanings, in this column.
UNITS 1–3
Three Questions
Some suggestions given below are applicable to all prose
lessons in the book.
v A Tolstoy story — the three questions in the opening
paragraph, though philosophical in nature, may be of
practical significance to individuals in self-realisation and
value inculcation.
v Spend about 10 minutes discussing the questions the
king asks. Let children express their views.  Even if their
observations do not reveal any understanding of the
questions, the discussion session will provide an excellent
base for the work to follow.
v The story is sectioned in two parts.  Each part may be sectioned
further according to convenience and time available.
v ‘Comprehension Check’ at the end of each section is a
recall of what they have read so far.  Design while-reading
comprehension exercises in the form of factual
2/HONEYCOMB
2020-21
THREE QUESTIONS/3
comprehension questions, multiple choice questions
and/or completion of sentences, etc.
v While covering portions of the text, either talk about the
illustrations or ask children to tell you about them.
Illustrations are there not merely for decoration but mainly
for comprehension.
v Questions under ‘Working with the Text’ to be answered
orally, later to be written in the copybook.
v At the end of the lesson, draw children’s attention to the
three questions in the context of the present period/class.
Isn’t the present period the right time to do as best
you can the task in hand jointly with the member(s)  of
the group for her/his good  and your own ?
The Squirrel
v Drawing a squirrel or finding the picture of a squirrel
and describing it variously will commit learners’ interest
to the poem they are reading.
v Help them find ‘wear’ and its usage in the dictionary.
Avoid fixed phrases like ‘wear and tear’ or ‘wear one’s
heart on one’s sleeve’, etc. Draw their attention to sentences
like the following.
• She wore  a plain dress but an enigmatic smile.
• Should a man wear a lady’s perfume ?
v The illustration given in the book may generate comments
such as the following.
• The squirrel’s tail looks like a question mark.
• It reminds me of the mark of punctuation that comes
at the end of an interrogative sentence.
• Looking at this squirrel, you might say it was asking
a question.  What is the question ?
• The squirrel is wearing a long overcoat reaching the
tip of its tail.
• If it begins to run now, its tail will look like the bushy
end of a painter’s brush.
NOTES FOR THE TEACHER/3
2020-21
v Speak the words given below.  Ask children to write the
word and against it two new words that rhyme.
gray ————————— —————————
mark ————————— —————————
went ————————— —————————
nut ————————— —————————
A Gift of Chappals
v Children’s world — their spontaneity  and imagination,
ability to see contradictions in normal behaviour and
moving acts of charity.
v While covering sections and sub-sections of the text, focus
on situations in which children see themselves.
v Elicit their comments on, and reactions to, Ravi’s
exaggerations about the kitten’s ancestry, children
cleverly feeding the kitten and Mridu and Meena’s final
act of charity. Focus on values such as sincerity, care
and compassion as exemplified in the episodes.
v Under ‘Working with Language’, highlight some points
about the use of if-clauses.
(i) An if-clause, also known as a conditional clause,
expresses a condition or cause whose result/effect is
felt in the second part of the sentence.
(ii) If the verb in the if-clause is in the present tense,
the other clause normally has ‘will + verb’.
(iii) An if-clause can be placed either at the beginning
or at the end of the main clause.
• I’ll come to your house if it doesn’t rain.
Or
• If it doesn’t rain, I’ll come to your house.
v Activity 2 under ‘Speaking and Writing’ lends itself to picking
up appropriate language to learn and practise life skills such
as decision-making, negotiating, persuading, etc.  Let all
the children in pairs/groups perform this activity. Help
them, wherever necessary, with appropriate language use.
4/HONEYCOMB
2020-21
Page 5


NOTES FOR THE TEACHER
General
v Learning a language means using it for a wide variety of
purposes. Language is best acquired when attention is
focused on meaning, not on form.
v Words and phrases not closely related to objects and
action remain empty and lifeless to young learners.
Language comes alive when presented in meaning-making
contexts.
v Words/phrases that are used to accomplish many useful
purposes follow a certain system inherent in the language
itself.
v Learners become familiar with the system through
continuous exposure to the language in meaning-focused
situations.
v Interaction, discussion and sharing of ideas among
learners provide opportunities that elicit ‘real’ information
about them and their experiences and opinions.
v Encourage learners to work in pairs and small groups
and let them go beyond the textbook by providing a
variety of language inputs for spontaneous and natural
use of language.
v Build on the exercises given in the textbook and design
more tasks/activities in keeping with learners’ interests,
needs and surroundings.  Employ free-response exercises
(with more than one possible response).
v Promote reading habits through story-reading (not
merely teaching stories as texts), story-retelling, choral
reading, shared reading, etc.
v Create class libraries for exchange of books and shared
reading.  The library may also move with children to the
next higher class.
2020-21
2/HONEYCOMB
v Introduce advertisement as a genre and discuss with the
learners about advertisements on social concerns such
as educating the girl child, protecting the environment,
saving water.
v Poems need not be taught line by line, word by word.
You may give a model reading but let every child read
the poem on her/his own to feel the richness of language,
rhythm and music of words. Exercises accompanying the
poem are more for understanding the poem as a whole
than for teaching language items.
v Encourage learners to tell new stories, narrate  anecdotes,
compose short poems in English or their own language,
talk about pictures, illustrations in the book and cartoons
in newspapers/magazines. Don’t get anxious about the
errors they will make. Constant exposure, practice and
correction in the form of feedback will help them improve
themselves by and by.
v Every page has a column for words and meanings.
Encourage children to write down other words they  find
difficult, along with their meanings, in this column.
UNITS 1–3
Three Questions
Some suggestions given below are applicable to all prose
lessons in the book.
v A Tolstoy story — the three questions in the opening
paragraph, though philosophical in nature, may be of
practical significance to individuals in self-realisation and
value inculcation.
v Spend about 10 minutes discussing the questions the
king asks. Let children express their views.  Even if their
observations do not reveal any understanding of the
questions, the discussion session will provide an excellent
base for the work to follow.
v The story is sectioned in two parts.  Each part may be sectioned
further according to convenience and time available.
v ‘Comprehension Check’ at the end of each section is a
recall of what they have read so far.  Design while-reading
comprehension exercises in the form of factual
2/HONEYCOMB
2020-21
THREE QUESTIONS/3
comprehension questions, multiple choice questions
and/or completion of sentences, etc.
v While covering portions of the text, either talk about the
illustrations or ask children to tell you about them.
Illustrations are there not merely for decoration but mainly
for comprehension.
v Questions under ‘Working with the Text’ to be answered
orally, later to be written in the copybook.
v At the end of the lesson, draw children’s attention to the
three questions in the context of the present period/class.
Isn’t the present period the right time to do as best
you can the task in hand jointly with the member(s)  of
the group for her/his good  and your own ?
The Squirrel
v Drawing a squirrel or finding the picture of a squirrel
and describing it variously will commit learners’ interest
to the poem they are reading.
v Help them find ‘wear’ and its usage in the dictionary.
Avoid fixed phrases like ‘wear and tear’ or ‘wear one’s
heart on one’s sleeve’, etc. Draw their attention to sentences
like the following.
• She wore  a plain dress but an enigmatic smile.
• Should a man wear a lady’s perfume ?
v The illustration given in the book may generate comments
such as the following.
• The squirrel’s tail looks like a question mark.
• It reminds me of the mark of punctuation that comes
at the end of an interrogative sentence.
• Looking at this squirrel, you might say it was asking
a question.  What is the question ?
• The squirrel is wearing a long overcoat reaching the
tip of its tail.
• If it begins to run now, its tail will look like the bushy
end of a painter’s brush.
NOTES FOR THE TEACHER/3
2020-21
v Speak the words given below.  Ask children to write the
word and against it two new words that rhyme.
gray ————————— —————————
mark ————————— —————————
went ————————— —————————
nut ————————— —————————
A Gift of Chappals
v Children’s world — their spontaneity  and imagination,
ability to see contradictions in normal behaviour and
moving acts of charity.
v While covering sections and sub-sections of the text, focus
on situations in which children see themselves.
v Elicit their comments on, and reactions to, Ravi’s
exaggerations about the kitten’s ancestry, children
cleverly feeding the kitten and Mridu and Meena’s final
act of charity. Focus on values such as sincerity, care
and compassion as exemplified in the episodes.
v Under ‘Working with Language’, highlight some points
about the use of if-clauses.
(i) An if-clause, also known as a conditional clause,
expresses a condition or cause whose result/effect is
felt in the second part of the sentence.
(ii) If the verb in the if-clause is in the present tense,
the other clause normally has ‘will + verb’.
(iii) An if-clause can be placed either at the beginning
or at the end of the main clause.
• I’ll come to your house if it doesn’t rain.
Or
• If it doesn’t rain, I’ll come to your house.
v Activity 2 under ‘Speaking and Writing’ lends itself to picking
up appropriate language to learn and practise life skills such
as decision-making, negotiating, persuading, etc.  Let all
the children in pairs/groups perform this activity. Help
them, wherever necessary, with appropriate language use.
4/HONEYCOMB
2020-21
The Rebel
v Activity 1 is a combination of open-ended as well as
text-based responses. Items (ii) and (iii) entail recalling/
looking at the appropriate lines in the poem whereas (i),
(iv), (v) and (vi) are discussion points.
v Let children read Introduction to the poem silently and
find the desired word.  The significance of the title will,
then, become amply  clear.
v The poem contains 15 couplets.  Each couplet may be
recited as an independent unit.
v Ask children if they think the last couplet expresses the
poet’s own opinion and comment.
v Relate the last couplet to the discussion item (vi) under
Activity 1.
Gopal and the Hilsa Fish
v A comic story to be understood through pictures with
strips of text for support.  Children will have a natural
enthusiasm for this new kind of material.
v Divide the class into small groups.  Let each group look
at and describe a set of pictures (assigned to them) and
construct their own text.  Texts thus produced can be
put together to form a complete story, to be edited for
coherence and accuracy. If necessary, texts may first be
produced in the child’s own language, and the teacher
can help them to reformulate these in English.
Conversely, for children fluent in English, this may
be an opportunity to formulate equivalent texts in
their own languages.
v Picture reading under ‘Speaking and Writing’ to be
attempted in the same manner.
v Word ladder provides an opportunity for vocabulary
building. Elicit the required word from learners by
providing a set of synonyms for it.
cross: angry, annoyed, displeased
tiny: small, little, negligible
NOTES FOR THE TEACHER/5
2020-21
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