Spot the Error - Rules and Examples, Verbal Ability CAT Notes | EduRev

English Language for SSC CHSL

SSC : Spot the Error - Rules and Examples, Verbal Ability CAT Notes | EduRev

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Introduction

Even those of us who are well-versed with English end up making the silliest of errors in grammar. It is a very natural tendency but error-spotting is not an art that one can’t master. It is just a matter of swearing by some guidelines and practice! 

Spot the Error - Rules and Examples, Verbal Ability CAT Notes | EduRev

Rules to Spot Errors in Sentences

1. Certain nouns possess a singular form but still represent plurality and thus, take a plural verb when used in a sentence.
Example: Cattle, peasantry, people, clergy, police.
(i) The Police has come. (Incorrect)
The Police have come. (Correct)


2. Certain nouns always take the plural verb because their form is always plural.
Example: Scissors, trousers, spectacles, thanks, premises.
(i) The scissors is kept on the table. (Incorrect)
The scissors are kept on the table. (Correct)
(ii) Where is my trouser? (Incorrect)
Where are my trousers? (Correct)


3. When a number is followed by a noun denoting measure, length, money, number, or weight, the form of a noun does not change as long as they are followed by another noun or pronoun.
Example: Million, pair, meter, year, dozen, foot, head. Thus,
(i) This is a nine-meters cloth. (Incorrect)
This is a nine-meter cloth. (Correct)

 

Try yourself:Sixty miles/are/a good distance.
View Solution


4. When a number is followed by a noun denoting measure, length, money, number, or weight, but these are not followed by another noun or pronoun, then they take the plural form.
Example: Million, pair, meter, year, dozen, foot, head. Thus,
(i) This saree is nine-yard long. (Incorrect)
This saree is nine-yards long. (Correct) 

Try yourself:The captain along with his team/are practicing very hard/for the/forth coming matches
View Solution


5. Certain nouns, especially of the collective category, are used as singular when they specify a unit.
Example: Public, team, committee, government, audience, orchestra, company, jury.
(i) The public were unanimous in their opinion. (Incorrect)
The public was unanimous in its opinion. (Correct) 

Try yourself:Most of the members at the meeting felt / that the group appointed for investigating the case / were not competent to do the job efficiently.
View Solution


6. Certain nouns, especially of the collective category, are used in the plural when they specify a difference of opinion or class (i.e. not used as single unit).
Example: Public, team, committee, government, audience, orchestra, company, jury.
(i) The jury was divided in its opinion. (Incorrect)
The jury were divided in their opinion. (Correct) 

(ii) The resources was divided based on its expertise. (Incorrect)

The resources were divided based on their expertise. (Correct)

Try yourself:Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error in it. The error, if any will be in one part of the sentence. The letter of that part is the answer. If there is no error, the answer is 'D'. (Ignore the errors of punctuation, if any).
View Solution


7. If the pronoun ‘one’ is used, it must be maintained throughout the sentence.
Example:
(i) One must respect his elders.  (Incorrect)
One must respect one’s elders. (Correct)

(ii) One must finish his task on time. (Incorrect)
One must finish one’s task on time. (Correct)


8. The word ‘whose’ is used for living people and ‘which’ is used for non-living things or ideas.
Example:
(i) Which box is kept on the table? (Incorrect)
Whose box is kept on the table?  (Correct)
(ii) Which photograph is lying here? (Incorrect)
Whose photograph is living there? (Correct)


9. ‘Less’ is used to denote quantity, while ‘fewer’ is used to denote number.
Example:
(i) No less than twenty people were (Incorrect)
No fewer than twenty people were (Correct)


10.  Sentences with words ‘each of’, ‘one of’, ‘none of’ is always followed by a plural form of the noun.
Example:
(i) She is one of the less important people in the office. (Incorrect)
She is one of the least important people in the office. (Correct) 
(ii) Each of the player performed well in the match. (Incorrect)

Each of the players performed well in the match.(Correct)

(iii) None of the student scored above 90% in boards.(Incorrect)

 None of the students scored above 90% in boards.(Correct)

Try yourself:My daughter's birthday is one / of the most important / day in my life.
View Solution


11. Only ‘than’ should be used after ‘no other’.
Example:
(i) I like no other movie, but Titanic. (Incorrect)
I like no other movie than Titanic. (Correct)


12. After the word ‘Know’, ‘how’; ‘what’ or ‘when’ should be used before using the infinitive.
Example:
(i) I know to speak English. (Incorrect)
I know how to speak English. (Correct) 

Try yourself:Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error in it. The error, if any will be in one part of the sentence. The letter of that part is the answer. If there is no error, the answer is 'D'. (Ignore the errors of punctuation, if any).
View Solution


13. If the verb indicates a purpose, an infinitive must be used and if the verb indicates a cause, a gerund must be used. 
Example:
(i) He went to the mall for watching a movie. (Incorrect)
He went to the mall to watch a movie. (Correct) 

Try yourself:Jimmy was / suspended for / showing indiscipline in the class. 
View Solution


14. As is not used with verbs like ‘appointed’, ‘elected’, ‘considered’, ‘called’ but it is used with the word ‘regard’.
Example:
(i) He was elected as Secretary of the organization. (Incorrect)
He was elected Secretary of the organization. (Correct) 

Try yourself:I personally / regard Prateek my / best friend. 
View Solution


15. Adverbs should not be confused with adjectives. An adjective describes the characteristics of the subject, while an adverb describes the action of the verb. 
Example:
(i) The horse looked beautifully. (Incorrect)
 The horse looked beautiful. (Correct)


16. Question tags are always the opposite of the sentence which means that if the sentence is positive, the question tag is negative and vice versa.
Example:
(i) You were dancing, were you? (Incorrect)
 You were dancing, weren’t you? (Correct)


17. An infinitive verb should never be split.
Example:
(i) I request you to kindly tell me. (Incorrect)
I request you kindly to tell me. (Correct)


18. A pronoun after ‘like’, ‘unlike’ and ‘let’ takes an objective case.
Example:
(i) You will never find a woman like she. (Incorrect)
You will never find a woman like her. (Correct)
(ii) Let I do it. (Incorrect)
Let me do it. (Correct) 

Try yourself:Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error in it. The error, if any will be in one part of the sentence. The letter of that part is the answer. If there is no error, the answer is 'D'. (Ignore the errors of punctuation, if any).
View Solution


19. The relative pronoun ‘that’ is used instead of ‘who’ or ‘which’ after adjectives in the superlative degree.
Example:
(i) This is the best which she could do. (Incorrect)
(ii) This is the best that she could do. (Correct)


20. To show equality ‘as’ is used both before and after the adjective.
Example:
(i) I can run as fast, if not faster than you. (Incorrect)
 I can run as fast as, if not faster than you. (Correct)


21. Even though ‘More than one’ indicates a plural sense, it agrees with a singular noun and takes a singular verb.
Example:
(i) More than one students completed their project. (Incorrect)
More than one student completed his project. (Correct)


22. ‘Scarcely’ and ‘hardly’ are followed by ‘when’ and not by ‘than’.
Example:
(i) Hardly had the teacher left the room than the pupils started enjoying. (Incorrect)
Hardly had the teacher left the room when the pupils started enjoying. (Correct)

(ii) Scarcely had he arrived than he had to leave again. (Incorrect)
Scarcely had he arrived when he had to leave again. (Correct)


23. ‘Though’ is followed by ‘yet’ and not by ‘but’.
Example:
(i) Though he is poor but he is honest. (Incorrect)
Though he is poor, yet he is honest. (Correct)


24. ‘Lest’ must be followed by ‘should’ or by nothing at all and ‘Such’ must be followed by ‘as’.
Example:
(i) Work hard lest you will fail. (Incorrect)
Work hard lest you should fail. (Correct)
Work hard lest you fail. (Correct)
(ii) He is such a writer that everybody should read his books. (Incorrect)
He is such a writer as everybody should read his books. (Correct) 

Try yourself:Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error in it. The error, if any will be in one part of the sentence. The letter of that part is the answer. If there is no error, the answer is 'D'. (Ignore the errors of punctuation, if any).
View Solution


25. ‘Unless’ expresses a condition and is always used in the negative sense. Thus ‘not’ is never used with ‘unless’.
Example: 
(i) Unless you do not work hard, you will not excel in the examination. (Incorrect)
Unless you work hard, you will not excel in the examination. (Correct)


26. ‘When’ denotes a general sense and ‘while’ implies a time duration of doing something.
Example:
(i) When learning how to sing, the technique is of utmost importance. (Incorrect)
While learning how to sing, the technique is of utmost importance. (Correct)


27. The preposition “off ” denotes “separation”, “at a distance from” or “far from” whereas the preposition “of” denotes cause, origin, quality, possession.
Example:
(i) Separation
He put of his coat. (Incorrect)
He put off his coat. (Correct)

(ii) Cause
He died off cancer. (Incorrect)
He died of cancer. (Correct) 

Try yourself:Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error in it. The error, if any will be in one part of the sentence. The letter of that part is the answer. If there is no error, the answer is 'D'. (Ignore the errors of punctuation, if any).
View Solution


28. Between is used for only two things or persons while among is used for more than two.
Example:
(i) You have to choose among tea and coffee. (Incorrect)
You have to choose between tea and coffee. (Correct)


29. During is used when we are talking about the time within which something happens. For is used when we are talking about how long something lasts.
Example:
(i) There were few incidents of irregularity for the Emergency years. (Incorrect)
There were few incidents of irregularity during the Emergency years. (Correct)


30. Use of ‘not only’ and ‘but also’ examine the sentences given below.
Example:
(i) He not only comes for swimming but also for coaching the learners. (Incorrect)
He comes not only for swimming but also for coaching the learners. (correct)


31. Neither is followed by nor, not by.
Example:
(i) The phone neither went dead or worked properly. (Incorrect)
The phone neither went dead nor worked properly. (Correct)

Try yourself:Read each sentence to find out whether there is any grammatical error in it. The error, if any will be in one part of the sentence. The letter of that part is the answer. If there is no error, the answer is 'D'. (Ignore the errors of punctuation, if any).
View Solution


32. The articles a/an or the are not used with words such as (kind of, sort of, type of, etc)

Example:

(i) What type of the books you like to read? (Incorrect)

What type of books do you like to read? (Correct)
(ii) What sort of an insect is that? (Incorrect)

What sort of insect is that? (Correct) 

33. Use Present Continuous tense rather than simple present tense, when the recurring action is problematic.

Example:

(i) She always hits me without any reason. (Incorrect)

She is always hitting me without any reason. (Correct)


34. If, in a sentence, two action clauses are to take place in the future, use simple present tense for the conditional clause and simple future tense for the other clause.

Example:

(i) The moment she will enter the room, we will start singing the birthday song. (Incorrect)

The moment she enters the room we will start singing the birthday song. (Correct)


35. For impossible past conditions, use past perfect and for its likely results use Would+Have+ 3rd form of Verb. Past perfect is used for impossible past conditions.

Example:

(i) If Jacob would have called me. I would have picked him up from the airport. (Incorrect)

If Jacob had called me, I would have picked him up from the airport. (Correct)

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