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Class 9 Civics Chapter 1 Practice Question Answers - Democratic Politics - I

Multiple Choice Questions

Q1: A person who has been arrested and detained has to be produced before the nearest magistrate within how many hours?
(a) 24 hours
(b) 48 hours
(c) 72 hours
(d) None of these
Ans:
(a)
A person who has been arrested and detained has to be produced before the nearest magistrate within 24 hours. This is to safeguard the individual's right to personal liberty and prevent unlawful detention.

Q2: Which right was called by Dr. Ambedkar as ‘the heart and soul of our Constitution’?
(a) Right to equality
(b) Right of constitutional remedies
(c) Right to freedom
(d) Right against exploitation
Ans: 
(b)
Dr. B.R. Ambedkar referred to the Right of Constitutional Remedies as 'the heart and soul of our Constitution.' This right enables citizens to move the court for the enforcement of their fundamental rights.

Q3: Who has the power to issue ‘writs’ for the enforcement of the Fundamental Rights?
(a) Supreme Court
(b) High Court
(c) (a) and (b)
(d) None of these
Ans:
(c)
The power to issue 'writs' for the enforcement of the Fundamental Rights lies with both the Supreme Court and the High Court.

Q4: What is the full form of P.I.L.?
(a) Postal Interest Letter
(b) Private Interest Law
(c) Public Information Law
(d) Public Interest Litigation
Ans:
(d)
The full form of P.I.L. is Public Interest Litigation. It is a legal mechanism that allows individuals or groups to bring issues of public importance before the court for resolution.

Q5: Who protects the fundamental rights of the citizens?
(a) Legislature
(b) Executive
(c) Judiciary
(d) None of these
Ans:
(c)
The judiciary protects the fundamental rights of the citizens by interpreting and upholding these rights through its judgments and decisions.

Q6: Under which Fundamental Right ‘begar’ stands abolished?
(a) Right to equality
(b) Right to freedom
(c) Right against exploitation
(d) None of these
Ans: 
(c)
Right against exploitation is one of the important fundamental rights as it is legal weapon to protect certain weaker sections of our society. In earlier days, some landlords or wealthy persons used to make some people do work free of change on one or the other pretext.
This pratice of ‘begar’or forced labour has now been made a crime and punishable by law under our constitution.

Q7: Which fundamental right’s used to enforce fundamental rights?
(a) Right to Equality
(b) Right to Constitutional Remedies
(c) Cultural and Educational Rights
(d) None of these
Ans:
(b)
Article 32 of the Constitution provides the right to move to the Supreme Court and High Courts for the enforcement of the Fundamental Rights. These courts can issue writs for the enforcement of such rights.

Q8: Which Fundamental Right is also called ‘cluster of six freedoms’:
(a) Right to Equality
(b) Right to Freedom
(c) Right to Constitutional Remedies
(d) None of these
Ans: 
(c)
Right to Freedom is also called ‘cluster of six freedom’. Our constitution provides six different types of freedoms under this fundamental right. These six freedom are-
(i) freedom of speech and expression.
(ii) freedom to assemble peacefully and without arms.
(iii) freedom to form association or unions.
(iv) freedom to more freely through out the territory of India.
(v) freedom to reside and settle in any part of the territory of India, and
(vi) freedom to practice any profession or to any occupation, trade or bussiness.

Q9: How many Fundamental Rights have been included in the Indian Constitution?
(a) Five Fundamental Rights
(b) Six Fundamental Rights
(c) Seven Fundamental Rights
(d) None of these
Ans:
(b)
There are six Fundamental Rights which are guaranteed by the Indian Constitution-
(i) Right to Equality (Article-14 to 18)
(ii) Right to Freedom (Article-19 to 22)
(iii) Right against Exploitation (Article-23 to 24)
(iv) Right to Freedom of Religion (Article-25 to 28)
(v) Cultural and Educational Rights (Article-29 and 30)
(vi) Right to Constitutional Remidies (Article-32)

Q10: Abolition of ‘bonded labour’ has been described in which right?
(a) Right to equality
(b) Right to freedom
(c) Right against exploitation
(d) Educational and cultural right
Ans: (c)
The abolition of 'bonded labour' is described under the Right against exploitation. This right aims to prevent human trafficking and forced labor.

Q11: Right to equality is also known as ‘Cluster of Six.
Ans: False
'Right to Equality' is not referred to as 'Cluster of Six'. In fact, it is one of the six fundamental rights recognized by the Indian constitution. The 'Right to Equality' includes equality before law, prohibition of discrimination, equality of opportunity in matters of public employment, and abolition of untouchability and titles.

Q12: Under right to equality men and women are considered equal.
Ans: True
Under the 'Right to Equality', both men and women are considered equal in the eyes of law. This means that no person can be discriminated against on the basis of their gender. This right is crucial in ensuring gender equality and justice in society.

Q13: The democracy and rights are mutually complementary.
Ans: True
Democracy and rights are mutually complementary because democracy cannot exist without rights and rights are meaningless without democracy. In a democratic society, every individual has certain rights that allow them to express their views, make choices, form political parties and contest elections. These rights ensure the functioning of democracy.

Q14: Rights are necessary in democracy to protect minorities from opression of majority.
Ans: True
In a democracy, rights are necessary to protect minorities from the oppression of the majority. This is because in a democracy the majority rules, but this can lead to the marginalization or oppression of minority groups. Therefore, rights are provided to ensure that minorities have a voice and their interests are protected.

Q15: Moral rights are those rights which are supported by law.
Ans: False
Moral rights are not supported by law. These are rights that individuals believe they should have based on moral or ethical principles. These rights may not necessarily be recognized or protected by the law. For instance, the right to live with dignity is a moral right. However, legal rights are those rights which are enshrined in the law of the land and are enforceable in a court of law.

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