Switch Basics | Computer Networks - Computer Science Engineering (CSE) PDF Download

SWITCH BASICS
We saw a variety of ways to build a switch, ranging from a general-purpose workstation with a suitable number of network interfaces to some sophisticated hardware designs. The control processor is responsible for running the routing protocols discussed above, among other things, and generally acts as the central point of control of the router. The switching fabric transfers packets from one port to another, just as in a switch; and the ports provide a range of functionality to allow the router to interface to links of various types (e.g., Ethernet or SONET).

Another consequence of the variable length of IP datagrams is that it can be harder to characterize the performance of a router than a switch that forwards only cells. Routers can usually forward a certain number of packets per second, and this implies that the total throughput in bits per second depends on packet size. Router designers generally have to make a choice as to what packet length they will support at line rate. That is, if (pps) packets per second is the rate at which packets arriving on a particular port can be forwarded, and linerate is the physical speed of the port in bits per second, then there will be some packetsize in bits such that:

packetsize× pps = linerate

 This is the packet size at which the router can forward at line rate; it is likely to be able to sustain line rate for longer packets but not for shorter packets. Sometimes a designer might decide that the right packet size to support is 40 bytes, since that is the minimum size of an IP packet that has a TCP header attached. Another choice might be the expected average packet size, which can be determined by studying traces of network traffic.

The document Switch Basics | Computer Networks - Computer Science Engineering (CSE) is a part of the Computer Science Engineering (CSE) Course Computer Networks.
All you need of Computer Science Engineering (CSE) at this link: Computer Science Engineering (CSE)
21 videos|107 docs|66 tests

Up next

FAQs on Switch Basics - Computer Networks - Computer Science Engineering (CSE)

1. What is a switch in computer networking?
Ans. A switch is a device used in computer networking to connect multiple devices, such as computers, printers, and servers, within a local area network (LAN). It allows these devices to communicate with each other by forwarding data packets between them.
2. How does a switch work?
Ans. A switch operates at the data link layer of the OSI model and uses MAC (Media Access Control) addresses to forward data packets. When a device sends data to another device on the network, the switch reads the destination MAC address and checks its MAC address table to determine the port to which the destination device is connected. It then forwards the data packet only to that specific port, optimizing network performance.
3. What is the difference between a switch and a hub?
Ans. A switch and a hub are both used to connect multiple devices in a network, but they work differently. A switch operates at the data link layer and forwards data packets based on MAC addresses, while a hub operates at the physical layer and simply broadcasts data to all connected devices. This means that a switch provides better performance, security, and bandwidth management compared to a hub.
4. Can I connect a switch to another switch?
Ans. Yes, you can connect switches together to expand the number of available ports and create larger network configurations. This is known as "switch stacking" or "switch cascading." By connecting switches, you can increase the number of devices that can be connected to the network and improve network reliability.
5. How do I configure a switch?
Ans. The configuration process for a switch varies depending on the manufacturer and model. Generally, you can configure a switch by connecting to its management interface, which is usually done through a web-based interface or a command-line interface (CLI). From there, you can set up VLANs, assign IP addresses, configure security settings, and manage other network-related settings. It is recommended to consult the manufacturer's documentation or seek assistance from a network administrator for specific switch configuration instructions.
21 videos|107 docs|66 tests
Download as PDF

Up next

Explore Courses for Computer Science Engineering (CSE) exam
Signup for Free!
Signup to see your scores go up within 7 days! Learn & Practice with 1000+ FREE Notes, Videos & Tests.
10M+ students study on EduRev
Related Searches

Semester Notes

,

Extra Questions

,

Sample Paper

,

MCQs

,

practice quizzes

,

Switch Basics | Computer Networks - Computer Science Engineering (CSE)

,

study material

,

video lectures

,

Free

,

mock tests for examination

,

pdf

,

Exam

,

Objective type Questions

,

Viva Questions

,

shortcuts and tricks

,

Summary

,

past year papers

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

ppt

,

Important questions

,

Switch Basics | Computer Networks - Computer Science Engineering (CSE)

,

Switch Basics | Computer Networks - Computer Science Engineering (CSE)

;