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DVMRP-Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol
Distance-vector routing,for unicast, can be extended to support multicast. The resulting protocol is calledDistance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol, or DVMRP. DVMRP was the first multicast routing protocol to see widespread use.Recall that, in the distance-vector algorithm, each router maintains a table of _Destination, Cost, NextHop_ tuples, and exchanges a list of _Destination, Cost_ pairs with its directly connected neighbors.

Extending this algorithm to support multicast is a two-stage process. First, we create a broadcast mechanism that allows a packet to be forwarded to all the networks on the internet. Second, we need to refine this mechanism so that it prunes back networks that do not have hosts that belong to the multicast group.Consequently, DVMRP is one of several multicast routing protocols described as flood-and-prune protocols.

Given a unicast routing table, each router knows that the current shortest path to a given destination goes through NextHop. Thus, whenever it receives a multicast packet from source S, the router forwards the packet on all outgoing links (except the one on which the packet arrived) if and only if the packet arrived over the link that is on the shortest path to S (i.e., the packet came from the NextHop associated with S in the routing table). This strategy effectively floods packets outward from S, but does not loop packets back toward S.

There are two major shortcomings to this approach. The first is that it truly floods the network; it has no provision for avoiding LANs that have no members in the multicast group. We address this problem below. The second limitation is that a given packet will be forwarded over a LAN by each of the routers connected to that LAN. This is due to the forwarding strategy of flooding packets on all links other than the one on which the packet arrived, without regard to whether or not those links are part of the shortest-path tree rooted at the source.

The solution to this second limitation is to eliminate the duplicate broadcast packets that are generated when more than one router is connected to a given LAN. One way to do this is to designate one router as the “parent” router for each link, relative to the source, where only the parent router is allowed to forward multicast packets from that source over the LAN. The router that has the shortest path to source S is selected as the parent; a tie between two routers would be broken according to which router has the smallest address. A given router can learn if it is the parent for the LAN (again relative to each possible source) based upon the distance-vector messages it exchanges with its neighbors.

The second stage is to propagate this “no members of G here” information up the shortest-path tree. This is done by having the router augment the _ Destination, Cost _ pairs it sends to its neighbors with the set of groups for which the leaf network is interested in receiving multicast packets. This information can then be propagated from router to router, so that for each of its links, a given router knows for what groups it should forward multicast packets.

Note that including all of this information in the routing update is a fairly expensive thing to do. In practice, therefore, this information is exchanged only when some source starts sending packets to that group. In other words, the strategy is to use RPB, which adds a small amount of overhead to the basic distance-vector algorithm, until a particular multicast address becomes active. At that time, routers that are not interested in receiving packets addressed to that group speak up, and that information is propagated to the other routers.

The document DVMRP Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol | Computer Networks - Computer Science Engineering (CSE) is a part of the Computer Science Engineering (CSE) Course Computer Networks.
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FAQs on DVMRP Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol - Computer Networks - Computer Science Engineering (CSE)

1. What is DVMRP and how does it work?
DVMRP stands for Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol. It is a routing protocol used for multicast communication in computer networks. DVMRP works by using a distance vector algorithm to determine the best path for multicast traffic to reach its destination. It maintains routing tables that store information about the network topology and the cost of reaching different destinations. These tables are periodically exchanged between routers to ensure that they have the most up-to-date information for making routing decisions.
2. What are the advantages of using DVMRP for multicast routing?
DVMRP has several advantages for multicast routing. Firstly, it is a well-established protocol that has been widely implemented and tested. It is also relatively simple and easy to configure, making it suitable for small to medium-sized networks. DVMRP is also compatible with unicast routing protocols, allowing for seamless integration with existing network infrastructure. Additionally, DVMRP supports both dense and sparse mode multicast routing, providing flexibility and scalability.
3. How does DVMRP handle network congestion and packet loss?
DVMRP uses various mechanisms to handle network congestion and packet loss. It employs a technique called pruning, where routers can dynamically prune unnecessary branches of the multicast distribution tree to conserve network resources. This helps to reduce congestion by minimizing the amount of multicast traffic being forwarded. DVMRP also implements a mechanism called reverse path forwarding (RPF) to prevent loops and ensure reliable packet delivery. RPF checks the source address of incoming multicast packets and only forwards them if they arrive on the expected interface.
4. Can DVMRP be used in large-scale networks?
Yes, DVMRP can be used in large-scale networks, but it may not be the most efficient choice. DVMRP relies on periodic updates and flooding of routing information, which can consume considerable network bandwidth and processing resources in large networks. As the network size increases, the scalability of DVMRP decreases. In such cases, other multicast routing protocols like Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) may be more suitable, as they employ more sophisticated algorithms that can better handle larger network environments.
5. Are there any security considerations when using DVMRP?
Yes, there are security considerations when using DVMRP. Since DVMRP relies on periodic updates and exchanges of routing information between routers, there is a potential for unauthorized access or modification of these updates. This can lead to routing table poisoning or other malicious activities that can disrupt multicast communication. To mitigate these risks, it is recommended to implement secure authentication mechanisms, such as using Message Digest Algorithm 5 (MD5) or other cryptographic techniques, to ensure the integrity and authenticity of DVMRP routing updates. Additionally, access control lists (ACLs) can be employed to restrict the sources and destinations of multicast traffic.
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