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Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - CAT MCQ


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25 Questions MCQ Test - Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 for CAT 2024 is part of CAT preparation. The Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 questions and answers have been prepared according to the CAT exam syllabus.The Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 MCQs are made for CAT 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 below.
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Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 1

To make clean breast of  

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 1

To make a clean breast of it' means to confess to one's mistakes or transgressions, to tell the truth about oneself. Therefore option C is the correct answer.

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 2

To keeps one's temper  

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 2

"To keeps one`s temper” : To be in good mood

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 3

To catch a tartar 

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 3

The correct answer is To catch a dangerous person​​.
Key Points

  • Let's look at the meaning of the given idiom:
    • To catch a tartar- to deal with someone or something that proves unexpectedly troublesome or powerful
  • Example: 
    • Now that she finally agreed to meet with you, you just might find that you've caught a tartar.​
Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 4

To drive home  

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 4

The idiom 'to drive home' means to emphasize an important point about something to someone. You state it in a very forceful and effective way so it is well delivered to the other end.

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 5

To have an axe to grind  

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 5

Option A is the correct answer because 'to have an axe to grind' means to have a private reason for doing or being involved in something.
Options B, C and D are incorrect because these are not the correct meanings of the given phrase. 
Option E is incorrect because the correct answer has already been chosen.
 

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 6

To cry wolf  

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 6
To cry wolf is an idiom that originates from Aesop's fable "The Boy Who Cried Wolf." It refers to the act of giving false alarms or raising unnecessary alarms, causing others to become skeptical or dismissive when a real threat or danger is present. The phrase is often used to describe situations where someone repeatedly exaggerates or fabricates stories or issues, leading to a loss of credibility. The idiom can be interpreted in different ways, but the most common meaning is "to give false alarm."
Here is a detailed explanation of the different options:
A: To listen eagerly
- This option does not accurately represent the meaning of the idiom "to cry wolf." It is not about listening eagerly but rather about the act of giving false alarms.
B: To give false alarm
- This option correctly represents the meaning of the idiom "to cry wolf." It refers to the act of repeatedly giving false alarms or raising unnecessary alarms.
C: To turn pale
- This option does not accurately represent the meaning of the idiom "to cry wolf." It is not about turning pale but rather about the act of giving false alarms.
D: To keep off starvation
- This option does not accurately represent the meaning of the idiom "to cry wolf." It is not about keeping off starvation but rather about the act of giving false alarms.
In conclusion, the correct answer is b. To give false alarm. This idiom is often used to caution against repeatedly exaggerating or fabricating stories or issues, as it can lead to a loss of credibility and make it difficult for others to trust or take the person seriously when a real threat or danger arises.
Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 7

 To end in smoke  

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 7

To end in smoke: to be destroyed or ruined.

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 8

To be above board  

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 8

To be above board: business agreement which is honest and not trying to deceive anyone.

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 9

To put one's hand to plough 

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 9

Option B is the correct answer because 'to put one's hand to the plough' means to begin or undertake a difficult task.

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 10

 To pick holes  

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 10

To pick holes: to try and make an idea or piece of work seem bad by finding all the things that are wrong or missing.

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 11

To leave someone in the lurch  

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 11

Definition of leave (someone) in the lurch
: to leave (someone) without help or protection when it is needed

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 12

To play second fiddle  

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 12

To play a supporting or minor role in relation to someone else: “Tired of playing second fiddle, she resigned and started her own company.” In an orchestra, the position of second violinist (fiddle) is not as glamorous as that of first violinist.

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 13

To beg the question  

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 13

Assume the truth of an argument or proposition to be proved, without arguing it.
Begging the question means "to elicit a specific question as a reaction or response," and can often be replaced with "a question that begs to be answered."
 

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 14

A black sheep 

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 14

In the English language, 'Black sheep' is an idiom used to describe an odd or disreputable member of a group, especially within a family.

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 15

A man of straw 

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 15

'A man of straw' is a man whose character is weak and who lacks definite beliefs; a man of no substance. Therefore option A is the correct answer. 
Options B, C and D are incorrect because these are not the correct meanings of the given phrase.

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 16

To smell a rat 

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 16

To smell a rat: to suspect or realize that something is wrong in a particular situation.

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 17

To hit the nail right on the head 

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 17

To hit the nail right on the head: to describe exactly what is causing a situation or problem

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 18

To set one's face against  

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 18
Definition: "To set one's face against" means to oppose with determination or to be strongly against something or someone.

To understand the meaning of the phrase "to set one's face against," we need to analyze the given options and choose the most appropriate one.
Option A: To oppose with determination:
- This option accurately describes the meaning of the phrase.
- It implies taking a firm stance against something or someone.
- When someone sets their face against something, they are determined to oppose it.
Option B: To judge by appearance:
- This option does not reflect the meaning of the phrase.
- "To set one's face against" is not related to judging someone based on their appearance.
Option C: To get out of difficulty:
- This option does not reflect the meaning of the phrase.
- "To set one's face against" is about opposition, not finding a way out of a difficult situation.
Option D: To look at one steadily:
- This option does not reflect the meaning of the phrase.
- "To set one's face against" is about opposition, not staring at someone steadily.
Conclusion:
Based on the analysis of the given options, the most suitable answer is Option A: To oppose with determination. This option accurately represents the meaning of the phrase "to set one's face against."
Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 19

 Sobhraj could be easily arrested because the police were tipped off in a advance. 

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 19

tipped off : to give someone a warning or secret information about something.

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 20

I met him after a long time, but he gave me the cold shoulder.  

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 20
Explanation:
The phrase "gave me the cold shoulder" is an idiomatic expression that means to ignore or treat someone with indifference. In this context, the person being referred to met someone after a long time, but instead of engaging or showing warmth, the person ignored them.
Options:
A: Scolded me - This option does not align with the given context as scolding involves expressing disapproval or criticism, which is different from ignoring someone.
B: Insulted me - This option also does not fit the context as insulting someone involves saying or doing something disrespectful or offensive, which is different from ignoring someone.
C: Abused me - This option is not applicable in the given context as abuse refers to the act of mistreating someone physically, emotionally, or verbally, which is different from ignoring someone.
D: Ignored me - This option accurately reflects the meaning of the phrase "gave me the cold shoulder" as it implies being treated with indifference or being disregarded.
Therefore, option D, "ignored me," is the correct answer that best fits the given context.
Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 21

He passed himself off as a noble man.  

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 21


The given sentence states that he passed himself off as a noble man. To find the correct answer choice, let's understand the meaning of the phrase "passed himself off as" which means to pretend to be someone else or to assume a false identity.


The correct answer is Option B: pretended to be because it accurately conveys the meaning of the original sentence.


Let's analyze the other answer choices:



  • Option A: was regarded as - This implies that others considered him to be a noble man, but it does not capture the element of deception or pretense present in the original sentence.

  • Option C: was thought to be - This suggests that others had a belief or opinion about him being a noble man, but it does not convey the idea of pretending or assuming a false identity.

  • Option D: was looked upon - This implies that others had a certain perception or view of him, but it does not specifically indicate pretending or assuming a false identity.


Therefore, the correct answer is Option B: pretended to be as it accurately represents the intended meaning of the original sentence.

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 22

This matter has been hanging fire for the last many months and must therefore be decided one way or the other. 

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 22

hanging fire: to delay, wait, hold back, or hesitate.

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 23

In the armed forces, it is considered a great privilege to die in harness. 

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 23

die in harness: to die while still at work.

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 24

The cricket match proved to be a big draw.

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 24

big draw: a big source of attraction.

Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 25

When he heard that he had once again not been selected he lost heart.  

Detailed Solution for Test: Idioms And Proverbs- 2 - Question 25

lost heart: having lost confidence or enthusiasm.

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