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Octet Rule - Chemical Bonding Video Lecture | Inorganic Chemistry

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FAQs on Octet Rule - Chemical Bonding Video Lecture - Inorganic Chemistry

1. What is the octet rule in chemical bonding?
Ans. The octet rule is a fundamental principle in chemical bonding that states that atoms tend to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to achieve a stable electron configuration with eight valence electrons, similar to the noble gases. This stability is achieved by filling the outermost electron shell, also known as the valence shell, with eight electrons.
2. How does the octet rule influence the formation of chemical bonds?
Ans. The octet rule influences the formation of chemical bonds as it explains why atoms tend to form certain types of bonds. For example, atoms with fewer than eight valence electrons tend to lose or gain electrons to achieve a stable octet configuration, forming ionic bonds. On the other hand, atoms with similar electronegativities share electrons to complete their valence shells, forming covalent bonds.
3. Are there any exceptions to the octet rule?
Ans. Yes, there are exceptions to the octet rule. Some atoms, such as hydrogen (H), helium (He), and lithium (Li), may have stable configurations with fewer than eight valence electrons. These atoms can achieve stability with two electrons (H and He) or four electrons (Li) in their valence shells. Additionally, elements beyond the second period (row) of the periodic table, such as phosphorus (P) and sulfur (S), can accommodate more than eight electrons in their valence shells due to the availability of d-orbitals.
4. Can the octet rule be applied to all elements in the periodic table?
Ans. The octet rule can be applied to many elements in the periodic table, particularly those in the second period (row) and beyond. However, there are exceptions for certain elements, as mentioned earlier. Elements in the first period (row), such as hydrogen and helium, can achieve stability with fewer than eight electrons, while elements beyond the second period can exceed the octet rule due to the availability of d-orbitals.
5. How does the octet rule explain the stability of noble gases?
Ans. The octet rule explains the stability of noble gases as they possess a full valence shell with eight electrons (except for helium, which has two). This complete electron configuration makes noble gases highly stable and unreactive, as they have no tendency to gain, lose, or share electrons with other atoms. Other elements strive to achieve a similar electron configuration, leading to the formation of chemical bonds in order to attain stability similar to the noble gases.
40 videos|91 docs|41 tests
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