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Representation of Wedge-Dash and Fischer Projection Video Lecture | Organic Chemistry

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FAQs on Representation of Wedge-Dash and Fischer Projection Video Lecture - Organic Chemistry

1. What is a Wedge-Dash representation?
Ans. A Wedge-Dash representation is a way to depict the three-dimensional structure of a molecule on a two-dimensional surface. It uses solid and dashed lines to represent the relative positions of substituents in a molecule. The solid wedge indicates that the substituent is coming out of the plane of the paper towards the viewer, while the dashed wedge indicates that the substituent is going behind the plane of the paper away from the viewer.
2. What is a Fischer projection?
Ans. A Fischer projection is a way to represent the spatial arrangement of atoms in a molecule, particularly for organic compounds. It uses vertical and horizontal lines to depict the carbon chain, with horizontal lines representing bonds coming out of the plane of the paper and vertical lines representing bonds going behind the plane of the paper. The projection is named after Emil Fischer, a German chemist who developed this method of representation.
3. How do you convert a Wedge-Dash representation to a Fischer projection?
Ans. To convert a Wedge-Dash representation to a Fischer projection, you need to determine the priority order of the substituents attached to the chiral carbon. The substituent with the highest atomic number is placed at the top of the Fischer projection. The other substituents are arranged accordingly, with the dashed lines going towards the viewer and the solid lines going away from the viewer.
4. Can a molecule have both Wedge-Dash and Fischer projections?
Ans. Yes, a molecule can have both Wedge-Dash and Fischer projections. The Wedge-Dash representation is commonly used to depict the three-dimensional structure of a molecule, while the Fischer projection is used to show the spatial arrangement of atoms in a compound. These two representations serve different purposes and can be used together to provide a comprehensive understanding of the molecule's structure.
5. Are Wedge-Dash and Fischer projections used in all branches of chemistry?
Ans. Wedge-Dash and Fischer projections are primarily used in organic chemistry, specifically for depicting the stereochemistry and spatial arrangement of atoms in organic compounds. However, they may also be used in related fields such as biochemistry and medicinal chemistry, where understanding the three-dimensional structure of molecules is crucial for studying their chemical properties and interactions. In other branches of chemistry, such as physical chemistry or inorganic chemistry, different types of representations may be more commonly employed.
33 videos|92 docs|46 tests
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