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English Full Test-2


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40 Questions MCQ Test Additional Study Material for CLAT | English Full Test-2

English Full Test-2 for CLAT 2022 is part of Additional Study Material for CLAT preparation. The English Full Test-2 questions and answers have been prepared according to the CLAT exam syllabus.The English Full Test-2 MCQs are made for CLAT 2022 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for English Full Test-2 below.
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English Full Test-2 - Question 1

Directions (Q. 1 - 5): Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been given underline to help locate them while answering some of the questions.

Students of the factors governing reading development in young children have achieved remarkable degree of consensus over the past two decades. This consensus concerns the casual role of phonological skills in young children’s reading progress. Children, who have good phonological skills, or good “phonological awareness”, become good readers and good spellers. Children with poor phonological skills progress more poorly. In particular, those who have a specific phonological deficit are likely to be classified as dyslexic by the time that they are 9 or 10 years old.

Phonological skills in young children can be measured at a number of different levels. The term phonological awareness is a global one, and refers to a deficit in recognising smaller units of should within spoken words. Development work has shown that this deficit can be at the level of syllables, of onsets and rimes, or of phonemes. For example, a 4-year old child might have difficulty in recognizing that a word like valentine has three syllables, suggesting a lack of syllabic awareness. A 5-year old might have difficulty in recognizing that the odd word out in the set of words fan, cat, hat, mat is fan, this task requires an awareness of the sub-syllabic units of the onset and the rime. The onset corresponds to any initial consonants in a syllable, and the rime corresponds to the vowel and to any following consonants. Rimes correspond to rhyms in single-syllable words, and so the rime in fan differs from the rime in cat, hat and mat. In longer words, rime and rhyme may differ. The onsets in val: en: tine are /v/ and /t/, and the rimes correspond to the spelling patterns ‘al’, ‘en’, and ‘ine’.

A 6-year old might have difficulty in recognizing that plea and pray being with the same initial sound. This is a phonemic judgement. Although the initial phoneme /P/ is shared between the two words, in plea it is part of ht onset ‘pl’, and in pray it is part of the onset ‘pr’. Until children can segment the onset (or the time), such phonemic judgements are difficult for them to make. In fact, a recent survey of different developmental studies has shown that the different levels of phonological awareness appear to emerge sequentially. The awareness of syllables, onsets, and rimes appears to emerge at around the ages of 3 and 4, long before most children go to school. The awareness of phonemes, on the other hand, usually emerges at around the age of 5 or 6, when children have been taught to read for about a year. An awareness of onsets and rimes thus appears to be a precursor of reading, whereas an awareness of phonemes at every serial position in a word, only appears to develop as reading is taught. The onset-rime and phonemic levels of phonological structure, however, are not distinct. Many onsets in English are single phonemes, and so are some rimes (e.g. sea, go, zoo).

The early availability of onsets and rimes is supported by studies that have compared the development of phonological awareness of onsets, rimes and phonemes in the same subjects using the same phonological awareness tasks. For example, a study by Treiman and Zudowski used a same different judgement task based on the beginning or the end sound of words. In the beginning sound task, the words either began with the same onset, as in plea and plank, or shred only the initial phoneme, as in plea and pray. In the end sound task, the words either shared the entire rime, as in spit and wit, or shred only the final phoneme, s in rat and wit Treiman and Zudowski showed that 4 and 5 year old children found the onset-rime version of the same different task significantly easier than the version based on phonemes. Only the 6-year olds, who had been learning to read for a year, were able to perform both versions of the tasks with equal levels of success.

Q.

From the following statements, pick out the true statement according to the passage

English Full Test-2 - Question 2

Students of the factors governing reading development in young children have achieved remarkable degree of consensus over the past two decades. This consensus concerns the casual role of phonological skills in young children’s reading progress. Children, who have good phonological skills, or good “phonological awareness”, become good readers and good spellers. Children with poor phonological skills progress more poorly. In particular, those who have a specific phonological deficit are likely to be classified as dyslexic by the time that they are 9 or 10 years old.

Phonological skills in young children can be measured at a number of different levels. The term phonological awareness is a global one, and refers to a deficit in recognising smaller units of should within spoken words. Development work has shown that this deficit can be at the level of syllables, of onsets and rimes, or of phonemes. For example, a 4-year old child might have difficulty in recognizing that a word like valentine has three syllables, suggesting a lack of syllabic awareness. A 5-year old might have difficulty in recognizing that the odd word out in the set of words fan, cat, hat, mat is fan, this task requires an awareness of the sub-syllabic units of the onset and the rime. The onset corresponds to any initial consonants in a syllable, and the rime corresponds to the vowel and to any following consonants. Rimes correspond to rhyms in single-syllable words, and so the rime in fan differs from the rime in cat, hat and mat. In longer words, rime and rhyme may differ. The onsets in val: en: tine are /v/ and /t/, and the rimes correspond to the spelling patterns ‘al’, ‘en’, and ‘ine’.

A 6-year old might have difficulty in recognizing that plea and pray being with the same initial sound. This is a phonemic judgement. Although the initial phoneme /P/ is shared between the two words, in plea it is part of ht onset ‘pl’, and in pray it is part of the onset ‘pr’. Until children can segment the onset (or the time), such phonemic judgements are difficult for them to make. In fact, a recent survey of different developmental studies has shown that the different levels of phonological awareness appear to emerge sequentially. The awareness of syllables, onsets, and rimes appears to emerge at around the ages of 3 and 4, long before most children go to school. The awareness of phonemes, on the other hand, usually emerges at around the age of 5 or 6, when children have been taught to read for about a year. An awareness of onsets and rimes thus appears to be a precursor of reading, whereas an awareness of phonemes at every serial position in a word, only appears to develop as reading is taught. The onset-rime and phonemic levels of phonological structure, however, are not distinct. Many onsets in English are single phonemes, and so are some rimes (e.g. sea, go, zoo).

The early availability of onsets and rimes is supported by studies that have compared the development of phonological awareness of onsets, rimes and phonemes in the same subjects using the same phonological awareness tasks. For example, a study by Treiman and Zudowski used a same different judgement task based on the beginning or the end sound of words. In the beginning sound task, the words either began with the same onset, as in plea and plank, or shred only the initial phoneme, as in plea and pray. In the end sound task, the words either shared the entire rime, as in spit and wit, or shred only the final phoneme, s in rat and wit Treiman and Zudowski showed that 4 and 5 year old children found the onset-rime version of the same different task significantly easier than the version based on phonemes. Only the 6-year olds, who had been learning to read for a year, were able to perform both versions of the tasks with equal levels of success.

Q.

Which one of the following is likely to emerge last in the cognitive development of a child?

English Full Test-2 - Question 3

Students of the factors governing reading development in young children have achieved remarkable degree of consensus over the past two decades. This consensus concerns the casual role of phonological skills in young children’s reading progress. Children, who have good phonological skills, or good “phonological awareness”, become good readers and good spellers. Children with poor phonological skills progress more poorly. In particular, those who have a specific phonological deficit are likely to be classified as dyslexic by the time that they are 9 or 10 years old.

Phonological skills in young children can be measured at a number of different levels. The term phonological awareness is a global one, and refers to a deficit in recognising smaller units of should within spoken words. Development work has shown that this deficit can be at the level of syllables, of onsets and rimes, or of phonemes. For example, a 4-year old child might have difficulty in recognizing that a word like valentine has three syllables, suggesting a lack of syllabic awareness. A 5-year old might have difficulty in recognizing that the odd word out in the set of words fan, cat, hat, mat is fan, this task requires an awareness of the sub-syllabic units of the onset and the rime. The onset corresponds to any initial consonants in a syllable, and the rime corresponds to the vowel and to any following consonants. Rimes correspond to rhyms in single-syllable words, and so the rime in fan differs from the rime in cat, hat and mat. In longer words, rime and rhyme may differ. The onsets in val: en: tine are /v/ and /t/, and the rimes correspond to the spelling patterns ‘al’, ‘en’, and ‘ine’.

A 6-year old might have difficulty in recognizing that plea and pray being with the same initial sound. This is a phonemic judgement. Although the initial phoneme /P/ is shared between the two words, in plea it is part of ht onset ‘pl’, and in pray it is part of the onset ‘pr’. Until children can segment the onset (or the time), such phonemic judgements are difficult for them to make. In fact, a recent survey of different developmental studies has shown that the different levels of phonological awareness appear to emerge sequentially. The awareness of syllables, onsets, and rimes appears to emerge at around the ages of 3 and 4, long before most children go to school. The awareness of phonemes, on the other hand, usually emerges at around the age of 5 or 6, when children have been taught to read for about a year. An awareness of onsets and rimes thus appears to be a precursor of reading, whereas an awareness of phonemes at every serial position in a word, only appears to develop as reading is taught. The onset-rime and phonemic levels of phonological structure, however, are not distinct. Many onsets in English are single phonemes, and so are some rimes (e.g. sea, go, zoo).

The early availability of onsets and rimes is supported by studies that have compared the development of phonological awareness of onsets, rimes and phonemes in the same subjects using the same phonological awareness tasks. For example, a study by Treiman and Zudowski used a same different judgement task based on the beginning or the end sound of words. In the beginning sound task, the words either began with the same onset, as in plea and plank, or shred only the initial phoneme, as in plea and pray. In the end sound task, the words either shared the entire rime, as in spit and wit, or shred only the final phoneme, s in rat and wit Treiman and Zudowski showed that 4 and 5 year old children found the onset-rime version of the same different task significantly easier than the version based on phonemes. Only the 6-year olds, who had been learning to read for a year, were able to perform both versions of the tasks with equal levels of success.

Q.

A phonological deficit in which of the following is likely to be classified as dyslexia?

English Full Test-2 - Question 4

Students of the factors governing reading development in young children have achieved remarkable degree of consensus over the past two decades. This consensus concerns the casual role of phonological skills in young children’s reading progress. Children, who have good phonological skills, or good “phonological awareness”, become good readers and good spellers. Children with poor phonological skills progress more poorly. In particular, those who have a specific phonological deficit are likely to be classified as dyslexic by the time that they are 9 or 10 years old.

Phonological skills in young children can be measured at a number of different levels. The term phonological awareness is a global one, and refers to a deficit in recognising smaller units of should within spoken words. Development work has shown that this deficit can be at the level of syllables, of onsets and rimes, or of phonemes. For example, a 4-year old child might have difficulty in recognizing that a word like valentine has three syllables, suggesting a lack of syllabic awareness. A 5-year old might have difficulty in recognizing that the odd word out in the set of words fan, cat, hat, mat is fan, this task requires an awareness of the sub-syllabic units of the onset and the rime. The onset corresponds to any initial consonants in a syllable, and the rime corresponds to the vowel and to any following consonants. Rimes correspond to rhyms in single-syllable words, and so the rime in fan differs from the rime in cat, hat and mat. In longer words, rime and rhyme may differ. The onsets in val: en: tine are /v/ and /t/, and the rimes correspond to the spelling patterns ‘al’, ‘en’, and ‘ine’.

A 6-year old might have difficulty in recognizing that plea and pray being with the same initial sound. This is a phonemic judgement. Although the initial phoneme /P/ is shared between the two words, in plea it is part of ht onset ‘pl’, and in pray it is part of the onset ‘pr’. Until children can segment the onset (or the time), such phonemic judgements are difficult for them to make. In fact, a recent survey of different developmental studies has shown that the different levels of phonological awareness appear to emerge sequentially. The awareness of syllables, onsets, and rimes appears to emerge at around the ages of 3 and 4, long before most children go to school. The awareness of phonemes, on the other hand, usually emerges at around the age of 5 or 6, when children have been taught to read for about a year. An awareness of onsets and rimes thus appears to be a precursor of reading, whereas an awareness of phonemes at every serial position in a word, only appears to develop as reading is taught. The onset-rime and phonemic levels of phonological structure, however, are not distinct. Many onsets in English are single phonemes, and so are some rimes (e.g. sea, go, zoo).

The early availability of onsets and rimes is supported by studies that have compared the development of phonological awareness of onsets, rimes and phonemes in the same subjects using the same phonological awareness tasks. For example, a study by Treiman and Zudowski used a same different judgement task based on the beginning or the end sound of words. In the beginning sound task, the words either began with the same onset, as in plea and plank, or shred only the initial phoneme, as in plea and pray. In the end sound task, the words either shared the entire rime, as in spit and wit, or shred only the final phoneme, s in rat and wit Treiman and Zudowski showed that 4 and 5 year old children found the onset-rime version of the same different task significantly easier than the version based on phonemes. Only the 6-year olds, who had been learning to read for a year, were able to perform both versions of the tasks with equal levels of success.

Q.

The Treiman and Zudowski experiment found evidence to support the following:

English Full Test-2 - Question 5

Students of the factors governing reading development in young children have achieved remarkable degree of consensus over the past two decades. This consensus concerns the casual role of phonological skills in young children’s reading progress. Children, who have good phonological skills, or good “phonological awareness”, become good readers and good spellers. Children with poor phonological skills progress more poorly. In particular, those who have a specific phonological deficit are likely to be classified as dyslexic by the time that they are 9 or 10 years old.

Phonological skills in young children can be measured at a number of different levels. The term phonological awareness is a global one, and refers to a deficit in recognising smaller units of should within spoken words. Development work has shown that this deficit can be at the level of syllables, of onsets and rimes, or of phonemes. For example, a 4-year old child might have difficulty in recognizing that a word like valentine has three syllables, suggesting a lack of syllabic awareness. A 5-year old might have difficulty in recognizing that the odd word out in the set of words fan, cat, hat, mat is fan, this task requires an awareness of the sub-syllabic units of the onset and the rime. The onset corresponds to any initial consonants in a syllable, and the rime corresponds to the vowel and to any following consonants. Rimes correspond to rhyms in single-syllable words, and so the rime in fan differs from the rime in cat, hat and mat. In longer words, rime and rhyme may differ. The onsets in val: en: tine are /v/ and /t/, and the rimes correspond to the spelling patterns ‘al’, ‘en’, and ‘ine’.

A 6-year old might have difficulty in recognizing that plea and pray being with the same initial sound. This is a phonemic judgement. Although the initial phoneme /P/ is shared between the two words, in plea it is part of ht onset ‘pl’, and in pray it is part of the onset ‘pr’. Until children can segment the onset (or the time), such phonemic judgements are difficult for them to make. In fact, a recent survey of different developmental studies has shown that the different levels of phonological awareness appear to emerge sequentially. The awareness of syllables, onsets, and rimes appears to emerge at around the ages of 3 and 4, long before most children go to school. The awareness of phonemes, on the other hand, usually emerges at around the age of 5 or 6, when children have been taught to read for about a year. An awareness of onsets and rimes thus appears to be a precursor of reading, whereas an awareness of phonemes at every serial position in a word, only appears to develop as reading is taught. The onset-rime and phonemic levels of phonological structure, however, are not distinct. Many onsets in English are single phonemes, and so are some rimes (e.g. sea, go, zoo).

The early availability of onsets and rimes is supported by studies that have compared the development of phonological awareness of onsets, rimes and phonemes in the same subjects using the same phonological awareness tasks. For example, a study by Treiman and Zudowski used a same different judgement task based on the beginning or the end sound of words. In the beginning sound task, the words either began with the same onset, as in plea and plank, or shred only the initial phoneme, as in plea and pray. In the end sound task, the words either shared the entire rime, as in spit and wit, or shred only the final phoneme, s in rat and wit Treiman and Zudowski showed that 4 and 5 year old children found the onset-rime version of the same different task significantly easier than the version based on phonemes. Only the 6-year olds, who had been learning to read for a year, were able to perform both versions of the tasks with equal levels of success.

Q.

The single-syllable words Rhyme and Rime are constituted by the exactly same set of
I. rime(s)
II. onset(s)
III. rhyme(s)
IV. phoneme(s)

English Full Test-2 - Question 6

Directions (Q. 6 - 15): In the following passage there are blanks each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below four or five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately.

Perhaps, we Americans do not yet fully understand the great (6)          .That India has to teach in thus (7)          . Her freedom. (8)          her mighty triumph of a (9)        revolution our War of Independence (10)                in size and concept. India has taught humanity a lesson, and it is (11)          our peril if we do not learn it. The lesson? That war and killing (12)          nothing (13)          loss, and that a noble end is assured only if the (14) to attain it are of a (15)              with it and also noble.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 6

English Full Test-2 - Question 7

Perhaps, we Americans do not yet fully understand the great (6)          .That India has to teach in thus (7)          . Her freedom. (8)          her mighty triumph of a (9)        revolution our War of Independence (10)                in size and concept. India has taught humanity a lesson, and it is (11)          our peril if we do not learn it. The lesson? That war and killing (12)          nothing (13)          loss, and that a noble end is assured only if the (14) to attain it are of a (15)              with it and also noble.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 7

English Full Test-2 - Question 8

Perhaps, we Americans do not yet fully understand the great (6)          .That India has to teach in thus (7)          . Her freedom. (8)          her mighty triumph of a (9)        revolution our War of Independence (10)                in size and concept. India has taught humanity a lesson, and it is (11)          our peril if we do not learn it. The lesson? That war and killing (12)          nothing (13)          loss, and that a noble end is assured only if the (14) to attain it are of a (15)              with it and also noble.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 8

English Full Test-2 - Question 9

Perhaps, we Americans do not yet fully understand the great (6)          .That India has to teach in thus (7)          . Her freedom. (8)          her mighty triumph of a (9)        revolution our War of Independence (10)                in size and concept. India has taught humanity a lesson, and it is (11)          our peril if we do not learn it. The lesson? That war and killing (12)          nothing (13)          loss, and that a noble end is assured only if the (14) to attain it are of a (15)              with it and also noble.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 9

Detailed Solution for English Full Test-2 - Question 9

C is the correct option. The paragraph is talking about the non violent struggle of India for its independence from the britishers termed as “bloodless” revolution.

English Full Test-2 - Question 10

Perhaps, we Americans do not yet fully understand the great (6)          .That India has to teach in thus (7)          . Her freedom. (8)          her mighty triumph of a (9)        revolution our War of Independence (10)                in size and concept. India has taught humanity a lesson, and it is (11)          our peril if we do not learn it. The lesson? That war and killing (12)          nothing (13)          loss, and that a noble end is assured only if the (14) to attain it are of a (15)              with it and also noble.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No.  10

Detailed Solution for English Full Test-2 - Question 10

C is the correct option. In the 9th option the answer is “bloodless” and following in the furtherance.

English Full Test-2 - Question 11

Perhaps, we Americans do not yet fully understand the great (6)          .That India has to teach in thus (7)          . Her freedom. (8)          her mighty triumph of a (9)        revolution our War of Independence (10)                in size and concept. India has taught humanity a lesson, and it is (11)          our peril if we do not learn it. The lesson? That war and killing (12)          nothing (13)          loss, and that a noble end is assured only if the (14) to attain it are of a (15)              with it and also noble.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 11

English Full Test-2 - Question 12

Perhaps, we Americans do not yet fully understand the great (6)          .That India has to teach in thus (7)          . Her freedom. (8)          her mighty triumph of a (9)        revolution our War of Independence (10)                in size and concept. India has taught humanity a lesson, and it is (11)          our peril if we do not learn it. The lesson? That war and killing (12)          nothing (13)          loss, and that a noble end is assured only if the (14) to attain it are of a (15)              with it and also noble.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 12

English Full Test-2 - Question 13

Perhaps, we Americans do not yet fully understand the great (6)          .That India has to teach in thus (7)          . Her freedom. (8)          her mighty triumph of a (9)        revolution our War of Independence (10)                in size and concept. India has taught humanity a lesson, and it is (11)          our peril if we do not learn it. The lesson? That war and killing (12)          nothing (13)          loss, and that a noble end is assured only if the (14) to attain it are of a (15)              with it and also noble.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 13

English Full Test-2 - Question 14

Perhaps, we Americans do not yet fully understand the great (6)          .That India has to teach in thus (7)          . Her freedom. (8)          her mighty triumph of a (9)        revolution our War of Independence (10)                in size and concept. India has taught humanity a lesson, and it is (11)          our peril if we do not learn it. The lesson? That war and killing (12)          nothing (13)          loss, and that a noble end is assured only if the (14) to attain it are of a (15)              with it and also noble.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 14

English Full Test-2 - Question 15

Perhaps, we Americans do not yet fully understand the great (6)          .That India has to teach in thus (7)          . Her freedom. (8)          her mighty triumph of a (9)        revolution our War of Independence (10)                in size and concept. India has taught humanity a lesson, and it is (11)          our peril if we do not learn it. The lesson? That war and killing (12)          nothing (13)          loss, and that a noble end is assured only if the (14) to attain it are of a (15)              with it and also noble.

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 15

English Full Test-2 - Question 16

Directions (Q. 16 - 20): Fill in the Blanks with Appropriate Words

When it come to back stabbing, a quill …… be than a dagger.

English Full Test-2 - Question 17

He was too ……. to …… that he had been wrong.

English Full Test-2 - Question 18

The Education Minister emphasized the need to discover and …… each student’s ……….. talents.

English Full Test-2 - Question 19

In a free and democratic country each and every person has rights as well as duties and it is of …….. importance that everything is ……… in the right perspective.

Detailed Solution for English Full Test-2 - Question 19

The correct option  is A.

 The importance of something is its quality of being significant, valued, or necessary in a particular situation. So  significant cannot be used here. Great is the best suitable for the blank.

English Full Test-2 - Question 20

He is usually ………, but today he appears rather ………

English Full Test-2 - Question 21

Directions (Q. 21 - 25): In the following sentences given, below, a word or phrase is written in underline letter. For each underline part four words/phrases are listed below each sentence. Choose the word nearest in meaning to the underline part.

Q. There was a major split in the Congress party in 1969.

English Full Test-2 - Question 22

Her views are not in consonance with her husband’s.

Detailed Solution for English Full Test-2 - Question 22

C is the correct option.Consonance here means  agreement or compatibility between opinions or actions.

English Full Test-2 - Question 23

The claims of students look hollow when they attributed their poor performance to difficulty of examination.

Detailed Solution for English Full Test-2 - Question 23

C is the correct option. Attribute' means 'regard something as the result of a particular thing'.
'Impute' means 'to say that something or someone is responsible for/the cause of something that has happened'.
This word means the same as the given italicized word. Hence option C is correct.

English Full Test-2 - Question 24

It is compulsory for all the students to join this tour.

English Full Test-2 - Question 25

The old man shows no sign of infirmity even though he is eighty years old.

English Full Test-2 - Question 26

Directions (Q. 26 - 30): Fill in the Blanks

Classical music fills the ears rather than …….. them.

English Full Test-2 - Question 27

We ……….the family members after expressing our grief at a tragedy.

Detailed Solution for English Full Test-2 - Question 27

The correct answer is D as the consoled is the correct word for the given sentence.

English Full Test-2 - Question 28

Rights …….. automatically to him who duly performs his duties.

English Full Test-2 - Question 29

He …. his shoes till they shone.

English Full Test-2 - Question 30

Improvement in efficiency and productivity has to be the key …….. of policy in respect of both the public and the private sectors in the Five Years Plans.

Detailed Solution for English Full Test-2 - Question 30

A is the correct option.As improvement and efficiency is a part of the policy, there the answer is ingredient.

English Full Test-2 - Question 31

Directions (Q. 31 - 35): In each of the following sentences, four options are given. You are required to identity the best way of writing the sentence in the context of the correct usage of standard written English. While doing so, you have to ensure that the message being conveyed remains the same in all the cases.

Q. The Indian cricket team’s winning it’s first game of the 2007 World Cup excited the fans of the team.

Detailed Solution for English Full Test-2 - Question 31

D is the correct option. The whole sentence is correct other than “it’s” because it's" is the contraction for the words "it is" or "it has." So the correct word to be used here is “its”. Its" refers to the possessive form of the pronoun "it."

English Full Test-2 - Question 32

Poor product quality angers Mr. Garbole, who wonders if it is part of a strategy by marketers.

Detailed Solution for English Full Test-2 - Question 32

Poor product quality is singular, so the singular noun ‘it’ must also be correct.

English Full Test-2 - Question 33

Ambikesh noticed the cat’s soft hair, sharp paws, and keen sense of hearing.

Detailed Solution for English Full Test-2 - Question 33

A is the correct option. The sentence is in the present tense not past. So notice should be used in place of noticed.Ambikesh notice the cat’s soft hair, sharp paws, and keen sense of hearing.

English Full Test-2 - Question 34

Having bowed our heads, the priest in the temple led us in prayer.

English Full Test-2 - Question 35

My grandmother seldom every wants to try and face the facts.

English Full Test-2 - Question 36

Directions (36-40): In these questions, out of the four alternatives choose the one which can be substituted for the given words/sentence.

Q.

A person who looks at the dark side of everything

Detailed Solution for English Full Test-2 - Question 36

C is the correct option.Pessimism is a negative or depressed mental attitude in which an undesirable outcome is anticipated from a given situation. Pessimists tend to focus on the negatives of life in general.

English Full Test-2 - Question 37

A man of lax moral character

English Full Test-2 - Question 38

Animas who eat flesh of another animal

English Full Test-2 - Question 39

A government by the nobles

English Full Test-2 - Question 40

Animals that can live on land and water

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