English Full Test-5


40 Questions MCQ Test English for CLAT | English Full Test-5


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This mock test of English Full Test-5 for CLAT helps you for every CLAT entrance exam. This contains 40 Multiple Choice Questions for CLAT English Full Test-5 (mcq) to study with solutions a complete question bank. The solved questions answers in this English Full Test-5 quiz give you a good mix of easy questions and tough questions. CLAT students definitely take this English Full Test-5 exercise for a better result in the exam. You can find other English Full Test-5 extra questions, long questions & short questions for CLAT on EduRev as well by searching above.
QUESTION: 1

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. 

Have you ever come across a painting, by Picasso, Mondrain, Miro, or any other modern abstract painter of this century, and found yourself engulfed in a brightly coloured canvas, which your sense cannot interpret? Many people would tend to denounce abstractionism as senseless trash, these people are disoriented by Miro’s bright, fanciful creatures and two-dimensional canvases. They click their tongues and shake their heads at Mondrain’s grind works, declaring the poor guy played too many scrabble games. They silently shake their heads in sympathy for Picasso; whose gruesome, distorted figures must be a reflection of his mental health. Then, standing in front of a work by Charlie Russell, the famous Western artist, they’ll declare it a work of Go. People feel more comfortable with something they can related to and understand immediately without too much thought. This is the case with the work of Charlie Russell. Being able to recognize the elements in his paintings – trees, horses and cowboys – gives people a safety line to their world of ‘reality’. There are some who would disagree when I say abstract art requires more creativity and artistic talent to produce a good piece than does representational art, but there are many weakness in their arguments.

            People who look down on abstract art have several major arguments to support their beliefs. They feel that artist turn abstract because they are not capable of the technical drafting skills that appear in a Russell; therefore, such artists create an art from that anyone is capable of and that is less time consuming, and then parade it as artistic progress. Secondly, they feel that the purpose of art is to create something of beauty in an orderly, logical composition. Russell’s compositions are balanced and rational; everything sits calmly on the canvas, leaving the viewer satisfied that he has seen all there is to see. The modern abstraction sits, one the other hand, seem to compose their pieces irrationally. For example, upon seeing Picasso’s Guernica, a friend of mine asked me. “What’s the point?” Finally, many people feel that art should portray the ideal and real. The exactness of detail in Charlie Russell’s work is an example of this. He has been called a great historian because his pieces depict the life style, dress, and events of the times. The subject matter is derived from his own experiences on the trial, reproduced to the smallest detail. I agree in part with many of these arguments, and at one time, even endorsed them, but now, I believe differently. Firstly, I object to the argument that abstract artists are not capable of drafting. Many abstract artists, such as Picasso, are excellent draftsmen. As his work matured, Picasso became more abstract in order to increase the expressive quality of his work. Guernica was meant as a protest against the bombing of that city by the victims more vividly; he distorted the figures and presented them in a black and white journalists manner. If he had used representational images and colour, much of the emotional content would have been lost and the piece would not have caused the demand for justice that it did. Secondly, I do not think that a piece must be logical and aesthetically pleasing to be art. The message it conveys to its viewers is more important. It should reflect the ideals and issues of this time and be true to itself, not just a flowery, glossy surface. For example, through his work, Mondrain was trying to present a system of simplicity, logic and rational order. As a result, his pieces did end up looking like a scrabble board. Miro created powerful, surrealistic images from his dreams and subconscious. These artists were trying to evoke a response from society through an expressionistic manner. Finally, abstract artists and representational artists maintain different ideas about ‘reality’. To the abstract artist, reality is what he feels about what his eyes see. This is the reality he interprets on canvas. This can be illustrated by Mondrain’s Trees series. You can actually see the progression from the recognizable, though abstracted, Trees, to his final solution, the grid system.

            A cycle of abstract and representational art began with the first scratching of prehistoric man. From the abstractions of ancient Egypt to representational, classical Rome, returning to abstractionism in early Christian art and so up to the present day, the cycle has been going on. But this day and age may witness its death through the camera. With film, there is no need to produce finely detailed, historical records manually; the camera does this for us more efficiently. May be, representational art would cease to exist. With abstractionism as the victor of the first battle, may be a different kind of cycle will be touched off. Possibly, sometime in the distant future, thousands of years from now, art itself will be physically non-existent. Some artists today believe that once they have planned and constructed a piece in their hands; it has already been done and can never be duplicated.

Q.

The author argues that many people look down upon abstract art because they feel that:

Solution:
QUESTION: 2

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. 

Have you ever come across a painting, by Picasso, Mondrain, Miro, or any other modern abstract painter of this century, and found yourself engulfed in a brightly coloured canvas, which your sense cannot interpret? Many people would tend to denounce abstractionism as senseless trash, these people are disoriented by Miro’s bright, fanciful creatures and two-dimensional canvases. They click their tongues and shake their heads at Mondrain’s grind works, declaring the poor guy played too many scrabble games. They silently shake their heads in sympathy for Picasso; whose gruesome, distorted figures must be a reflection of his mental health. Then, standing in front of a work by Charlie Russell, the famous Western artist, they’ll declare it a work of Go. People feel more comfortable with something they can related to and understand immediately without too much thought. This is the case with the work of Charlie Russell. Being able to recognize the elements in his paintings – trees, horses and cowboys – gives people a safety line to their world of ‘reality’. There are some who would disagree when I say abstract art requires more creativity and artistic talent to produce a good piece than does representational art, but there are many weakness in their arguments.

            People who look down on abstract art have several major arguments to support their beliefs. They feel that artist turn abstract because they are not capable of the technical drafting skills that appear in a Russell; therefore, such artists create an art from that anyone is capable of and that is less time consuming, and then parade it as artistic progress. Secondly, they feel that the purpose of art is to create something of beauty in an orderly, logical composition. Russell’s compositions are balanced and rational; everything sits calmly on the canvas, leaving the viewer satisfied that he has seen all there is to see. The modern abstraction sits, one the other hand, seem to compose their pieces irrationally. For example, upon seeing Picasso’s Guernica, a friend of mine asked me. “What’s the point?” Finally, many people feel that art should portray the ideal and real. The exactness of detail in Charlie Russell’s work is an example of this. He has been called a great historian because his pieces depict the life style, dress, and events of the times. The subject matter is derived from his own experiences on the trial, reproduced to the smallest detail. I agree in part with many of these arguments, and at one time, even endorsed them, but now, I believe differently. Firstly, I object to the argument that abstract artists are not capable of drafting. Many abstract artists, such as Picasso, are excellent draftsmen. As his work matured, Picasso became more abstract in order to increase the expressive quality of his work. Guernica was meant as a protest against the bombing of that city by the victims more vividly; he distorted the figures and presented them in a black and white journalists manner. If he had used representational images and colour, much of the emotional content would have been lost and the piece would not have caused the demand for justice that it did. Secondly, I do not think that a piece must be logical and aesthetically pleasing to be art. The message it conveys to its viewers is more important. It should reflect the ideals and issues of this time and be true to itself, not just a flowery, glossy surface. For example, through his work, Mondrain was trying to present a system of simplicity, logic and rational order. As a result, his pieces did end up looking like a scrabble board. Miro created powerful, surrealistic images from his dreams and subconscious. These artists were trying to evoke a response from society through an expressionistic manner. Finally, abstract artists and representational artists maintain different ideas about ‘reality’. To the abstract artist, reality is what he feels about what his eyes see. This is the reality he interprets on canvas. This can be illustrated by Mondrain’s Trees series. You can actually see the progression from the recognizable, though abstracted, Trees, to his final solution, the grid system.

            A cycle of abstract and representational art began with the first scratching of prehistoric man. From the abstractions of ancient Egypt to representational, classical Rome, returning to abstractionism in early Christian art and so up to the present day, the cycle has been going on. But this day and age may witness its death through the camera. With film, there is no need to produce finely detailed, historical records manually; the camera does this for us more efficiently. May be, representational art would cease to exist. With abstractionism as the victor of the first battle, may be a different kind of cycle will be touched off. Possibly, sometime in the distant future, thousands of years from now, art itself will be physically non-existent. Some artists today believe that once they have planned and constructed a piece in their hands; it has already been done and can never be duplicated.

Q.

The author believes that people feel comfortable with representational art because

Solution:
QUESTION: 3

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. 

Have you ever come across a painting, by Picasso, Mondrain, Miro, or any other modern abstract painter of this century, and found yourself engulfed in a brightly coloured canvas, which your sense cannot interpret? Many people would tend to denounce abstractionism as senseless trash, these people are disoriented by Miro’s bright, fanciful creatures and two-dimensional canvases. They click their tongues and shake their heads at Mondrain’s grind works, declaring the poor guy played too many scrabble games. They silently shake their heads in sympathy for Picasso; whose gruesome, distorted figures must be a reflection of his mental health. Then, standing in front of a work by Charlie Russell, the famous Western artist, they’ll declare it a work of Go. People feel more comfortable with something they can related to and understand immediately without too much thought. This is the case with the work of Charlie Russell. Being able to recognize the elements in his paintings – trees, horses and cowboys – gives people a safety line to their world of ‘reality’. There are some who would disagree when I say abstract art requires more creativity and artistic talent to produce a good piece than does representational art, but there are many weakness in their arguments.

            People who look down on abstract art have several major arguments to support their beliefs. They feel that artist turn abstract because they are not capable of the technical drafting skills that appear in a Russell; therefore, such artists create an art from that anyone is capable of and that is less time consuming, and then parade it as artistic progress. Secondly, they feel that the purpose of art is to create something of beauty in an orderly, logical composition. Russell’s compositions are balanced and rational; everything sits calmly on the canvas, leaving the viewer satisfied that he has seen all there is to see. The modern abstraction sits, one the other hand, seem to compose their pieces irrationally. For example, upon seeing Picasso’s Guernica, a friend of mine asked me. “What’s the point?” Finally, many people feel that art should portray the ideal and real. The exactness of detail in Charlie Russell’s work is an example of this. He has been called a great historian because his pieces depict the life style, dress, and events of the times. The subject matter is derived from his own experiences on the trial, reproduced to the smallest detail. I agree in part with many of these arguments, and at one time, even endorsed them, but now, I believe differently. Firstly, I object to the argument that abstract artists are not capable of drafting. Many abstract artists, such as Picasso, are excellent draftsmen. As his work matured, Picasso became more abstract in order to increase the expressive quality of his work. Guernica was meant as a protest against the bombing of that city by the victims more vividly; he distorted the figures and presented them in a black and white journalists manner. If he had used representational images and colour, much of the emotional content would have been lost and the piece would not have caused the demand for justice that it did. Secondly, I do not think that a piece must be logical and aesthetically pleasing to be art. The message it conveys to its viewers is more important. It should reflect the ideals and issues of this time and be true to itself, not just a flowery, glossy surface. For example, through his work, Mondrain was trying to present a system of simplicity, logic and rational order. As a result, his pieces did end up looking like a scrabble board. Miro created powerful, surrealistic images from his dreams and subconscious. These artists were trying to evoke a response from society through an expressionistic manner. Finally, abstract artists and representational artists maintain different ideas about ‘reality’. To the abstract artist, reality is what he feels about what his eyes see. This is the reality he interprets on canvas. This can be illustrated by Mondrain’s Trees series. You can actually see the progression from the recognizable, though abstracted, Trees, to his final solution, the grid system.

            A cycle of abstract and representational art began with the first scratching of prehistoric man. From the abstractions of ancient Egypt to representational, classical Rome, returning to abstractionism in early Christian art and so up to the present day, the cycle has been going on. But this day and age may witness its death through the camera. With film, there is no need to produce finely detailed, historical records manually; the camera does this for us more efficiently. May be, representational art would cease to exist. With abstractionism as the victor of the first battle, may be a different kind of cycle will be touched off. Possibly, sometime in the distant future, thousands of years from now, art itself will be physically non-existent. Some artists today believe that once they have planned and constructed a piece in their hands; it has already been done and can never be duplicated.

Q.

In the author’s opinion, Picasso’s Guernica created a strong demand for justice since

Solution:
QUESTION: 4

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it.

Have you ever come across a painting, by Picasso, Mondrain, Miro, or any other modern abstract painter of this century, and found yourself engulfed in a brightly coloured canvas, which your sense cannot interpret? Many people would tend to denounce abstractionism as senseless trash, these people are disoriented by Miro’s bright, fanciful creatures and two-dimensional canvases. They click their tongues and shake their heads at Mondrain’s grind works, declaring the poor guy played too many scrabble games. They silently shake their heads in sympathy for Picasso; whose gruesome, distorted figures must be a reflection of his mental health. Then, standing in front of a work by Charlie Russell, the famous Western artist, they’ll declare it a work of Go. People feel more comfortable with something they can related to and understand immediately without too much thought. This is the case with the work of Charlie Russell. Being able to recognize the elements in his paintings – trees, horses and cowboys – gives people a safety line to their world of ‘reality’. There are some who would disagree when I say abstract art requires more creativity and artistic talent to produce a good piece than does representational art, but there are many weakness in their arguments.

            People who look down on abstract art have several major arguments to support their beliefs. They feel that artist turn abstract because they are not capable of the technical drafting skills that appear in a Russell; therefore, such artists create an art from that anyone is capable of and that is less time consuming, and then parade it as artistic progress. Secondly, they feel that the purpose of art is to create something of beauty in an orderly, logical composition. Russell’s compositions are balanced and rational; everything sits calmly on the canvas, leaving the viewer satisfied that he has seen all there is to see. The modern abstraction sits, one the other hand, seem to compose their pieces irrationally. For example, upon seeing Picasso’s Guernica, a friend of mine asked me. “What’s the point?” Finally, many people feel that art should portray the ideal and real. The exactness of detail in Charlie Russell’s work is an example of this. He has been called a great historian because his pieces depict the life style, dress, and events of the times. The subject matter is derived from his own experiences on the trial, reproduced to the smallest detail. I agree in part with many of these arguments, and at one time, even endorsed them, but now, I believe differently. Firstly, I object to the argument that abstract artists are not capable of drafting. Many abstract artists, such as Picasso, are excellent draftsmen. As his work matured, Picasso became more abstract in order to increase the expressive quality of his work. Guernica was meant as a protest against the bombing of that city by the victims more vividly; he distorted the figures and presented them in a black and white journalists manner. If he had used representational images and colour, much of the emotional content would have been lost and the piece would not have caused the demand for justice that it did. Secondly, I do not think that a piece must be logical and aesthetically pleasing to be art. The message it conveys to its viewers is more important. It should reflect the ideals and issues of this time and be true to itself, not just a flowery, glossy surface. For example, through his work, Mondrain was trying to present a system of simplicity, logic and rational order. As a result, his pieces did end up looking like a scrabble board. Miro created powerful, surrealistic images from his dreams and subconscious. These artists were trying to evoke a response from society through an expressionistic manner. Finally, abstract artists and representational artists maintain different ideas about ‘reality’. To the abstract artist, reality is what he feels about what his eyes see. This is the reality he interprets on canvas. This can be illustrated by Mondrain’s Trees series. You can actually see the progression from the recognizable, though abstracted, Trees, to his final solution, the grid system.

            A cycle of abstract and representational art began with the first scratching of prehistoric man. From the abstractions of ancient Egypt to representational, classical Rome, returning to abstractionism in early Christian art and so up to the present day, the cycle has been going on. But this day and age may witness its death through the camera. With film, there is no need to produce finely detailed, historical records manually; the camera does this for us more efficiently. May be, representational art would cease to exist. With abstractionism as the victor of the first battle, may be a different kind of cycle will be touched off. Possibly, sometime in the distant future, thousands of years from now, art itself will be physically non-existent. Some artists today believe that once they have planned and constructed a piece in their hands; it has already been done and can never be duplicated.

Q.

The author acknowledges that Mondrain’s pieces may have ended up looking like a scrabble board because

Solution:
QUESTION: 5

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. 

Have you ever come across a painting, by Picasso, Mondrain, Miro, or any other modern abstract painter of this century, and found yourself engulfed in a brightly coloured canvas, which your sense cannot interpret? Many people would tend to denounce abstractionism as senseless trash, these people are disoriented by Miro’s bright, fanciful creatures and two-dimensional canvases. They click their tongues and shake their heads at Mondrain’s grind works, declaring the poor guy played too many scrabble games. They silently shake their heads in sympathy for Picasso; whose gruesome, distorted figures must be a reflection of his mental health. Then, standing in front of a work by Charlie Russell, the famous Western artist, they’ll declare it a work of Go. People feel more comfortable with something they can related to and understand immediately without too much thought. This is the case with the work of Charlie Russell. Being able to recognize the elements in his paintings – trees, horses and cowboys – gives people a safety line to their world of ‘reality’. There are some who would disagree when I say abstract art requires more creativity and artistic talent to produce a good piece than does representational art, but there are many weakness in their arguments.

            People who look down on abstract art have several major arguments to support their beliefs. They feel that artist turn abstract because they are not capable of the technical drafting skills that appear in a Russell; therefore, such artists create an art from that anyone is capable of and that is less time consuming, and then parade it as artistic progress. Secondly, they feel that the purpose of art is to create something of beauty in an orderly, logical composition. Russell’s compositions are balanced and rational; everything sits calmly on the canvas, leaving the viewer satisfied that he has seen all there is to see. The modern abstraction sits, one the other hand, seem to compose their pieces irrationally. For example, upon seeing Picasso’s Guernica, a friend of mine asked me. “What’s the point?” Finally, many people feel that art should portray the ideal and real. The exactness of detail in Charlie Russell’s work is an example of this. He has been called a great historian because his pieces depict the life style, dress, and events of the times. The subject matter is derived from his own experiences on the trial, reproduced to the smallest detail. I agree in part with many of these arguments, and at one time, even endorsed them, but now, I believe differently. Firstly, I object to the argument that abstract artists are not capable of drafting. Many abstract artists, such as Picasso, are excellent draftsmen. As his work matured, Picasso became more abstract in order to increase the expressive quality of his work. Guernica was meant as a protest against the bombing of that city by the victims more vividly; he distorted the figures and presented them in a black and white journalists manner. If he had used representational images and colour, much of the emotional content would have been lost and the piece would not have caused the demand for justice that it did. Secondly, I do not think that a piece must be logical and aesthetically pleasing to be art. The message it conveys to its viewers is more important. It should reflect the ideals and issues of this time and be true to itself, not just a flowery, glossy surface. For example, through his work, Mondrain was trying to present a system of simplicity, logic and rational order. As a result, his pieces did end up looking like a scrabble board. Miro created powerful, surrealistic images from his dreams and subconscious. These artists were trying to evoke a response from society through an expressionistic manner. Finally, abstract artists and representational artists maintain different ideas about ‘reality’. To the abstract artist, reality is what he feels about what his eyes see. This is the reality he interprets on canvas. This can be illustrated by Mondrain’s Trees series. You can actually see the progression from the recognizable, though abstracted, Trees, to his final solution, the grid system.

            A cycle of abstract and representational art began with the first scratching of prehistoric man. From the abstractions of ancient Egypt to representational, classical Rome, returning to abstractionism in early Christian art and so up to the present day, the cycle has been going on. But this day and age may witness its death through the camera. With film, there is no need to produce finely detailed, historical records manually; the camera does this for us more efficiently. May be, representational art would cease to exist. With abstractionism as the victor of the first battle, may be a different kind of cycle will be touched off. Possibly, sometime in the distant future, thousands of years from now, art itself will be physically non-existent. Some artists today believe that once they have planned and constructed a piece in their hands; it has already been done and can never be duplicated.

Q.

The main difference between the abstract and the representational artist in matters of the ‘idea’ and the ‘real’ according to the author is:

Solution:
QUESTION: 6

Directions (6 - 15): In the following passage there are blanks each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below four or five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately.

It is not good for man that this life should be all joy and (6)             the lands which only know sunshine and never rain become (7)                the most beautiful countries are those which are (8)               visited by both sunshine and rain. It is in these lands that (9)              and fruit grow beautiful than a (10)               of life is to be rounded and many-coloured (11)                the rainbow, both joy and sorrow must come to it. Those who have never known (12)                  but prosperity and pleasure become hard and (13)                but those whose prosperity has been mixed with (14)                  become kind and (15)               .

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 6

Solution:
QUESTION: 7

It is not good for man that this life should be all joy and (6)             the lands which only know sunshine and never rain become (7)                the most beautiful countries are those which are (8)               visited by both sunshine and rain. It is in these lands that (9)              and fruit grow beautiful than a (10)               of life is to be rounded and many-coloured (11)                the rainbow, both joy and sorrow must come to it. Those who have never known (12)                  but prosperity and pleasure become hard and (13)                but those whose prosperity has been mixed with (14)                  become kind and (15)               .

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 7

Solution:
QUESTION: 8

It is not good for man that this life should be all joy and (6)             the lands which only know sunshine and never rain become (7)                the most beautiful countries are those which are (8)               visited by both sunshine and rain. It is in these lands that (9)              and fruit grow beautiful than a (10)               of life is to be rounded and many-coloured (11)                the rainbow, both joy and sorrow must come to it. Those who have never known (12)                  but prosperity and pleasure become hard and (13)                but those whose prosperity has been mixed with (14)                  become kind and (15)               .

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 8

Solution:
QUESTION: 9

It is not good for man that this life should be all joy and (6)             the lands which only know sunshine and never rain become (7)                the most beautiful countries are those which are (8)               visited by both sunshine and rain. It is in these lands that (9)              and fruit grow beautiful than a (10)               of life is to be rounded and many-coloured (11)                the rainbow, both joy and sorrow must come to it. Those who have never known (12)                  but prosperity and pleasure become hard and (13)                but those whose prosperity has been mixed with (14)                  become kind and (15)               .

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 9

Solution:
QUESTION: 10

It is not good for man that this life should be all joy and (6)             the lands which only know sunshine and never rain become (7)                the most beautiful countries are those which are (8)               visited by both sunshine and rain. It is in these lands that (9)              and fruit grow beautiful than a (10)               of life is to be rounded and many-coloured (11)                the rainbow, both joy and sorrow must come to it. Those who have never known (12)                  but prosperity and pleasure become hard and (13)                but those whose prosperity has been mixed with (14)                  become kind and (15)               .

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 10

Solution:
QUESTION: 11

It is not good for man that this life should be all joy and (6)             the lands which only know sunshine and never rain become (7)                the most beautiful countries are those which are (8)               visited by both sunshine and rain. It is in these lands that (9)              and fruit grow beautiful than a (10)               of life is to be rounded and many-coloured (11)                the rainbow, both joy and sorrow must come to it. Those who have never known (12)                  but prosperity and pleasure become hard and (13)                but those whose prosperity has been mixed with (14)                  become kind and (15)               .

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 11

Solution:
QUESTION: 12

It is not good for man that this life should be all joy and (6)             the lands which only know sunshine and never rain become (7)                the most beautiful countries are those which are (8)               visited by both sunshine and rain. It is in these lands that (9)              and fruit grow beautiful than a (10)               of life is to be rounded and many-coloured (11)                the rainbow, both joy and sorrow must come to it. Those who have never known (12)                  but prosperity and pleasure become hard and (13)                but those whose prosperity has been mixed with (14)                  become kind and (15)               .

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 12

Solution:
QUESTION: 13

It is not good for man that this life should be all joy and (6)             the lands which only know sunshine and never rain become (7)                the most beautiful countries are those which are (8)               visited by both sunshine and rain. It is in these lands that (9)              and fruit grow beautiful than a (10)               of life is to be rounded and many-coloured (11)                the rainbow, both joy and sorrow must come to it. Those who have never known (12)                  but prosperity and pleasure become hard and (13)                but those whose prosperity has been mixed with (14)                  become kind and (15)               .

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 13

Solution:
QUESTION: 14

It is not good for man that this life should be all joy and (6)             the lands which only know sunshine and never rain become (7)                the most beautiful countries are those which are (8)               visited by both sunshine and rain. It is in these lands that (9)              and fruit grow beautiful than a (10)               of life is to be rounded and many-coloured (11)                the rainbow, both joy and sorrow must come to it. Those who have never known (12)                  but prosperity and pleasure become hard and (13)                but those whose prosperity has been mixed with (14)                  become kind and (15)               .

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 14

Solution:
QUESTION: 15

It is not good for man that this life should be all joy and (6)             the lands which only know sunshine and never rain become (7)                the most beautiful countries are those which are (8)               visited by both sunshine and rain. It is in these lands that (9)              and fruit grow beautiful than a (10)               of life is to be rounded and many-coloured (11)                the rainbow, both joy and sorrow must come to it. Those who have never known (12)                  but prosperity and pleasure become hard and (13)                but those whose prosperity has been mixed with (14)                  become kind and (15)               .

Q. Find out the appropriate words for the No. 15

Solution:
QUESTION: 16

Directions (Q. 16 - 20): Each question below has two blanks, each blank indicating than something has been omitted. Choose the set of words for each blank that best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole.

Q.

Civilisation, in the real sense of the term, consists not in the ....... but in deliberate and voluntary ........ of wants.

Solution:
QUESTION: 17

Public sector units running at a loss should be given the option to be ...... to the highest bidder with a golden handshake for employees or to converted into workers’ cooperatives with workers holding ............. ownership.

Solution:
QUESTION: 18

Ravi .......... a bit ......... he was not invited by his friend to attend the party.

Solution:
QUESTION: 19

In architecture, much more than in any of the other arts, there is a marked time lag between the ............ of ideas and their........... in the shape of completed buildings.

Solution:
QUESTION: 20

The great scientist ........ himself with ability and moderation all ........... the conference.

Solution:
QUESTION: 21

Directions (Q. 21 - 25): In the sentences given below, a word or phrase is written in underline letter. For each underline part four words/phrases are listed below each sentence. Choose the word nearest in meaning to the underline part.

Q. The prisoner made an abortive attempt to escape from the jail.

Solution:
QUESTION: 22

A million cinemas a year bring the same stale balderdash.

Solution:
QUESTION: 23

His speech was nothing but a string of platitudes.

Solution:
QUESTION: 24

The opposition made a strident demand for putting the bill to vote.

Solution:

The correct option is C.
Voiceforeous means expressing or characterized by vehement opinions; loud and forceful.
And strident means loud and harsh.
 

QUESTION: 25

He soon got fed up with his sedentary job.

Solution:
QUESTION: 26

Directions (Q. 26 - 30): Fill in the Blanks

Q. The prisoner was released on ............. for good behaviour.

Solution:
QUESTION: 27

She requested the student to ........... a little water in a vessel.

Solution:
QUESTION: 28

The speaker ......... the scope of his paper on ‘Work-ethic’ at the outset.

Solution:
QUESTION: 29

One major .............. between the Election Commission and the Union Government is related to the powers of the former in respect of the deployment of central police forces at places where an election is held.

Solution:
QUESTION: 30

The purpose of education must be to ....... attitudes as well as to impart knowledge and skills.

Solution:
QUESTION: 31

Directions (Q. 31 - 35): In each of the following sentences, four options are given. You are, required to identity the best way of writing the sentence in the contest of the correct usage of standard written English, while doing so, you have to ensure that the message being conveyed remains the same in all the cases.

Q. When one travels by Air Lahara, you often find that the prices are high and that he journey experience is extremely poor.

Solution:

The correct option is D.
This was an unnecessary shift of pronoun. Do not shift from you to one. Choice D changes the meaning unnecessarily.
 

QUESTION: 32

Ever since the sting operation, there has been much opposition from they who maintain that it was an unauthorized act.

Solution:

The correct option is C.
The demonstrative pronoun those is needed here – from those (persons). In other options the pronoun ‘they’ is incorrect. In option D, ‘maintaining’ is used incorrectly. Hence, we are left with option C as the correct answer.
 

QUESTION: 33

Having stole the money, the class teacher searched the student’s pocket.

Solution:
QUESTION: 34

The child is neither encouraged to be critical or to examine all the aspects of his opinion.

Solution:

The correct option is D.
None of the other sentences are correct.
 

QUESTION: 35

Although I calculate that my girlfriend will be here any minute, I cannot wait much longer for her to arrive.

Solution:

D is the correct option. Because except option d, in others he has calculated that his girlfriend will be there any minute but in option d he "THINKS" that his girlfriend will be there any minute. So option D is odd one out of the four options so the correct answer is option D because rest others have the same meaning.

QUESTION: 36

Directions (36-40): In these questions, out of the four alternatives choose the one which can be substituted for the given words/sentence.

Q.

Killing of human being

Solution:
QUESTION: 37

Voluntarily giving up throne by king in favour of his son

Solution:
QUESTION: 38

Killing of one’s own brother

Solution:
QUESTION: 39

Child bereaved of one or both the parents

Solution:
QUESTION: 40

Rainfall at irregular intervals or occasionally

Solution:

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