UPSC Exam  >  UPSC Tests  >  Indian Economy for UPSC CSE  >  Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - UPSC MCQ

Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - UPSC MCQ


Test Description

20 Questions MCQ Test Indian Economy for UPSC CSE - Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2

Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 for UPSC 2024 is part of Indian Economy for UPSC CSE preparation. The Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 questions and answers have been prepared according to the UPSC exam syllabus.The Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 MCQs are made for UPSC 2024 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 below.
Solutions of Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 questions in English are available as part of our Indian Economy for UPSC CSE for UPSC & Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 solutions in Hindi for Indian Economy for UPSC CSE course. Download more important topics, notes, lectures and mock test series for UPSC Exam by signing up for free. Attempt Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 | 20 questions in 20 minutes | Mock test for UPSC preparation | Free important questions MCQ to study Indian Economy for UPSC CSE for UPSC Exam | Download free PDF with solutions
1 Crore+ students have signed up on EduRev. Have you? Download the App
Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 1

GDP of a country is based on

Detailed Solution for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 1
GDP of a country is based on the final value of goods and services.
Explanation:
- GDP stands for Gross Domestic Product, which is a measure of the total value of goods and services produced within a country's borders during a specific period.
- The final value of goods and services refers to the value of the products after all stages of production have been completed.
- This means that the intermediate goods and services used in the production process are not included in the GDP calculation.
- Only the value of the final goods and services that are consumed by households, businesses, government, and exported to other countries is considered in the GDP calculation.
- The final value is determined by adding up the prices of all the final goods and services produced in the economy.
- This includes both tangible goods (such as cars, clothes, and food) and intangible services (such as healthcare, education, and transportation).
- The GDP calculation takes into account the market value of these goods and services, which is determined by the prices at which they are bought and sold in the market.
- By focusing on the final value of goods and services, GDP provides a comprehensive measure of a country's economic output and is widely used to compare the economic performance of different countries.
Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 2

Assertion : Economic activities grouped into three categories are highly dependent.
Reason : Primary and secondary activities cannot produce a good unless they are aided by the tertiary sector.

Detailed Solution for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 2
Assertion : Economic activities grouped into three categories are highly dependent.
Reason : Primary and secondary activities cannot produce a good unless they are aided by the tertiary sector.
The given assertion and reason statement can be evaluated as follows:
A: Both A and R are true and R is the correct explanation of A
- This option states that both the assertion and reason are true, and the reason is the correct explanation for the assertion.
- To determine if this option is correct, we need to evaluate if both the assertion and reason are true and if the reason indeed explains the assertion.
B: Both A and R are true but R is not the correct explanation of A
- This option states that both the assertion and reason are true, but the reason is not the correct explanation for the assertion.
- To determine if this option is correct, we need to evaluate if both the assertion and reason are true and if the reason does not explain the assertion correctly.
C: A is correct but R is wrong
- This option states that the assertion is correct, but the reason is wrong.
- To determine if this option is correct, we need to evaluate if the assertion is true and if the reason is false.
D: A is wrong but R is correct
- This option states that the assertion is wrong, but the reason is correct.
- To determine if this option is correct, we need to evaluate if the assertion is false and if the reason is true.
The correct answer is A: Both A and R are true and R is the correct explanation of A.
Explanation:
- Economic activities are grouped into three categories: primary, secondary, and tertiary.
- Primary activities involve the extraction of raw materials from nature, such as agriculture, mining, fishing, etc.
- Secondary activities involve the processing and manufacturing of these raw materials into finished goods, such as factories and industries.
- Tertiary activities involve the provision of services, such as transportation, banking, education, healthcare, etc.
- The reason provided states that primary and secondary activities cannot produce a good unless they are aided by the tertiary sector.
- This is true because the tertiary sector provides essential services that support and facilitate the production and distribution of goods.
- For example, without transportation services provided by the tertiary sector, it would be challenging to transport raw materials to factories and distribute finished goods to consumers.
- Similarly, without banking services, it would be difficult for businesses to manage their finances and invest in production.
- Therefore, the tertiary sector plays a crucial role in supporting and aiding primary and secondary activities in the production of goods.
- Hence, both the assertion and reason are true, and the reason correctly explains the assertion.
Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 3

Choose the correct meaning of organised sector:

Detailed Solution for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 3
Meaning of Organised Sector:
The correct meaning of the organised sector is:
A. It covers those enterprises where the terms of employment are regular.
Explanation:
The organised sector refers to a segment of the economy where enterprises operate in a structured and regulated manner. Here are the key points to understand the meaning of the organised sector:
1. Regular Terms of Employment: In the organised sector, the terms of employment for workers are regular. This means that employees have fixed working hours, employment contracts, and are entitled to benefits such as paid leave, social security, and other statutory protections.
2. Government Regulation: The organised sector is subject to government regulations and oversight. The government sets rules and standards related to labor laws, wages, safety regulations, and other aspects to ensure fair and equitable working conditions for employees.
3. Formal Economy: The organised sector is part of the formal economy, where activities are recorded, regulated, and contribute to the overall GDP of the country. It includes industries such as manufacturing, finance, IT services, healthcare, and organized retail.
4. Job Stability: The organised sector provides relatively more job stability compared to the unorganised sector. Employees have a clear career progression, opportunities for skill development, and access to various employee benefits.
In conclusion, the correct meaning of the organised sector is that it covers enterprises where the terms of employment are regular. It is characterized by government regulation, job stability, and adherence to labor laws and standards.
Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 4

MGNREGA guarantees job to poor for

Detailed Solution for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 4
The Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA)
MGNREGA guarantees job opportunities for the poor and aims to provide them with employment for a certain number of days. The correct answer is option A: 100 days. Here is a detailed explanation:
1. MGNREGA:
- MGNREGA stands for Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act.
- It is a social security measure that guarantees the right to work for rural households in India.
- The act was enacted in 2005 and ensures employment opportunities for the rural poor.
2. Job Guarantee:
- MGNREGA guarantees a certain number of days of employment to eligible households.
- The number of guaranteed days is 100 days in a financial year.
- This means that every eligible rural household can get employment for up to 100 days in a year.
3. Purpose:
- The primary objective of MGNREGA is to enhance the livelihood security of rural households by providing them with employment opportunities.
- It aims to create durable assets and develop rural infrastructure through the labor-intensive work carried out by the beneficiaries.
4. Eligibility and Implementation:
- To avail the benefits of MGNREGA, individuals must be registered job cardholders.
- The job cards are issued to adult members of rural households.
- The program is implemented by the local gram panchayats (village councils) and monitored by various government bodies.
5. Benefits:
- MGNREGA provides financial security to the rural poor by ensuring a fixed number of days of employment.
- It helps in poverty alleviation and reduces distress migration from rural to urban areas.
- The program also focuses on empowering women and promotes their participation in the workforce.
In conclusion, MGNREGA guarantees job opportunities for the poor for 100 days in a financial year. This initiative has played a significant role in providing employment and improving the livelihoods of rural households in India.
Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 5

Which of the following is True for GDP?

Detailed Solution for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 5
True Statements about GDP:

  • GDP includes the value of final goods and services produced within a country: GDP measures the total value of all final goods and services produced within a country's borders during a specific time period. It includes both tangible goods (such as cars and computers) and intangible services (such as healthcare and education).

  • GDP is measured for one year: GDP is typically measured on an annual basis. It provides a snapshot of a country's economic performance over a specific timeframe, usually a calendar year.


Explanation:

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is a key indicator used to measure the economic activity and performance of a country. It provides valuable information about the size and growth of an economy. In this case, option C is the correct answer as it states that both statements A and B are true.


Statement A is true because GDP includes the value of all final goods and services produced within a country. It does not include intermediate goods (goods used in the production process) to avoid double-counting.


Statement B is also true because GDP is typically measured for a specific time period, often one year. However, it is important to note that GDP can be measured quarterly or annually, depending on the requirements and availability of data.


Therefore, the correct answer is option C: Both statements A and B are true.

Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 6

Which of the following is included in tertiary sector?

Detailed Solution for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 6
Answer:
The tertiary sector, also known as the service sector, is the part of the economy that provides services to consumers and businesses. It includes a wide range of industries that are involved in providing services rather than producing goods. The following are included in the tertiary sector:
1. ATM booths: These are self-service machines that allow individuals to withdraw cash, check account balances, and perform other banking transactions.
2. Call centres: Call centers are facilities where a large number of customer service representatives handle incoming calls from customers. They provide assistance, answer questions, and resolve issues for various businesses.
3. Internet cafe: Internet cafes are establishments that provide customers with access to computers and the internet for a fee. They are often used by individuals who do not have access to a computer or internet connection at home.
Therefore, the correct answer is D: All of them.
The tertiary sector plays a crucial role in the economy as it contributes to job creation, income generation, and economic growth. It encompasses a wide range of services that cater to various needs and demands of individuals and businesses. From financial services to hospitality, healthcare to transportation, the tertiary sector covers a diverse range of industries that are essential for the functioning of modern society.
Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 7

In the last 100 years, the sector gaining prominance is

Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 8

On which of the following basis, the sectors are classified into public and private sector?

Detailed Solution for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 8
Classification of Sectors into Public and Private Sector
The sectors are classified into public and private sector based on the ownership of enterprises. Here is a detailed explanation:
Ownership of Enterprises:
- Public Sector: In the public sector, the ownership of enterprises is with the government or its agencies. These enterprises are established and operated by the government to provide essential goods and services to the public. The government has control over the management and decision-making process of these enterprises. Examples of public sector enterprises include government departments, public schools, public hospitals, and state-owned companies.
- Private Sector: In the private sector, the ownership of enterprises is with individuals or groups of individuals who run the business for profit. These enterprises are owned and operated by private individuals or private companies. The government has limited or no control over the management and decision-making process of these enterprises. Examples of private sector enterprises include sole proprietorships, partnerships, and privately owned corporations.
Other Factors:
- Employment Conditions: While employment conditions can vary between public and private sectors, it is not the primary basis for classification. Both sectors can offer different employment conditions based on factors such as labor laws, regulations, and the specific industry.
- Nature of Economic Activity: Although the nature of economic activity can vary between public and private sectors, it is not the primary basis for classification. Both sectors can engage in various economic activities such as manufacturing, services, agriculture, and trade.
- Number of Workers Employed: The number of workers employed in an enterprise is not the basis for classifying sectors into public and private. It is possible to find both public and private sector enterprises with a high or low number of workers.
Therefore, the primary basis for classifying sectors into public and private is the ownership of enterprises. Public sector enterprises are owned by the government, while private sector enterprises are owned by individuals or private companies.
Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 9

Government owns most of the assets and provides all the services:

Detailed Solution for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 9
Government owns most of the assets and provides all the services:
Explanation:
In this scenario, the government is responsible for owning the majority of assets and providing all the services. Let's break it down further to understand each option:
A: Private Sector
- The private sector refers to businesses or organizations that are owned and controlled by private individuals or groups.
- In the private sector, assets and services are owned and provided by individuals or private companies, not the government.
B: Public Sector
- The public sector consists of organizations that are owned and operated by the government.
- In the public sector, assets and services are owned and provided by the government itself. This sector includes government departments, agencies, and public enterprises.
C: Organised Sector
- The organized sector refers to the formal sector of the economy that is regulated by the government and follows labor laws.
- It includes industries and establishments that are registered and comply with government regulations.
D: Tertiary Sector
- The tertiary sector, also known as the service sector, includes activities that involve providing services to individuals or businesses.
- While the government can provide services in this sector, it does not necessarily mean that it owns most of the assets.
Answer: B - Public Sector
- The public sector best fits the description given in the question, as it involves the government owning most of the assets and providing all the services.
Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 10

Information and Technology is a part of

Detailed Solution for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 10
Information and Technology is a part of the tertiary sector.
The tertiary sector, also known as the service sector, is the sector of the economy that provides services to consumers and other businesses. It includes activities such as retail, transportation, healthcare, education, and hospitality. Information and Technology is a crucial part of this sector as it involves the provision of various IT services and products. Here's a detailed explanation:

Definition of the tertiary sector:
The tertiary sector is the sector of the economy that focuses on providing services rather than producing goods. It includes a wide range of activities that are vital for the smooth functioning of society and the economy.

Explanation of Information and Technology in the tertiary sector:
Information and Technology refers to the use, development, and management of computer-based systems to process, transmit, and store information. It plays a significant role in various industries and sectors, including the tertiary sector. Here's why Information and Technology is a part of the tertiary sector:
- IT services: Information and Technology companies offer a range of IT services to businesses and individuals in the tertiary sector. These services include software development, web design, network installation and maintenance, cybersecurity, cloud computing, IT consulting, and technical support.
- E-commerce: The rise of online shopping and e-commerce platforms has greatly contributed to the growth of the tertiary sector. Information and Technology enables businesses to sell products and services online, reaching a wider customer base and providing convenience to consumers.
- Digital marketing: In the modern era, digital marketing has become an essential part of promoting businesses and services. Information and Technology tools and platforms, such as social media, search engine optimization, email marketing, and analytics, are used to reach target audiences and increase brand visibility.
- Communication and collaboration: Information and Technology facilitates communication and collaboration within and between businesses in the tertiary sector. Tools like email, video conferencing, instant messaging, and project management software enable efficient communication and teamwork.
- Data analysis and management: With the increasing amount of data generated by businesses, Information and Technology plays a crucial role in data analysis and management. It helps businesses collect, store, analyze, and interpret data to make informed decisions and improve operations.
Conclusion:
Information and Technology is an integral part of the tertiary sector as it provides essential services, enables digital transformation, and enhances productivity and efficiency in various industries. Its role in the service sector is vital for economic growth and development.
Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 11

Which of the following is also known as disguised unemployment.? 

Detailed Solution for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 11

When more than required numbers of people are engaged in productive activities, it is called underemployment. In this case, work done by a person is hidden and even if the person is removed from employment, the production will remain the same. Therefore, underemployment is also known as disguised unemployment.

Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 12

The value of all final goods and services produced within a country during a particular year is called as:

Detailed Solution for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 12
Gross Domestic Product (GDP)
Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is the total value of all final goods and services produced within a country during a specific period, usually a year. It is an important measure of a country's economic performance and is widely used to compare the economic growth of different countries. Here is a detailed explanation of GDP:
1. Definition:
- GDP is the market value of all final goods and services produced within the geographic boundaries of a country during a specific time period.
- It includes goods and services produced by both domestic and foreign entities within the country.
2. Final Goods and Services:
- GDP considers only the value of final goods and services, which are products that are ready for consumption or investment.
- Intermediate goods, which are used in the production process, are not included in GDP to avoid double-counting.
3. Production and Income Approaches:
- There are two approaches to calculate GDP: the production approach and the income approach.
- The production approach measures GDP by adding up the value of all goods and services produced in different sectors of the economy.
- The income approach measures GDP by adding up all the incomes generated from the production of goods and services.
4. Components of GDP:
- GDP is divided into several components, including consumption, investment, government spending, and net exports.
- Consumption represents the spending by individuals and households on goods and services.
- Investment includes spending on capital goods, such as machinery and equipment, as well as residential and non-residential construction.
- Government spending refers to the expenditure by the government on goods and services.
- Net exports represent the difference between a country's exports and imports.
5. Importance of GDP:
- GDP is a crucial indicator of a country's economic health and standard of living.
- It helps policymakers and economists assess the overall economic performance and make informed decisions.
- GDP growth is often used as a measure of economic development and prosperity.
In conclusion, Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is the value of all final goods and services produced within a country during a specific period. It is an essential measure of a country's economic performance and provides valuable insights into its economic health and standard of living.
Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 13

In the secondary sector some process of manufacturing is not done out of the following place.

Detailed Solution for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 13

We can manufacture goods in factories (automobile industries),Workshop(simple machines like small crane)and Homes(papad,soap,etc) but school only teaches you but it is not a place to produce goods.

Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 14

Public health is the responsibility of

Detailed Solution for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 14
Public health is the responsibility of the government.

Key points:
- Public health refers to the overall health and well-being of the population.
- It includes various aspects such as disease prevention, health promotion, and ensuring access to healthcare services.
- The responsibility for public health lies primarily with the government due to the following reasons:
1. Establishing and implementing health policies:
- The government is responsible for formulating and implementing health policies that address the health needs of the population.
- These policies can include measures to prevent diseases, promote healthy lifestyles, and improve access to healthcare services.
2. Allocating resources:
- The government is responsible for allocating resources to support public health initiatives.
- This includes funding healthcare systems, research and development, and public health programs.
3. Regulating and monitoring:
- The government plays a crucial role in regulating and monitoring public health activities.
- This involves setting standards, conducting inspections, and enforcing regulations to ensure the safety and quality of healthcare services.
4. Emergency preparedness and response:
- The government is responsible for planning and responding to public health emergencies, such as outbreaks of infectious diseases or natural disasters.
- This includes coordinating emergency response efforts, mobilizing resources, and providing support to affected communities.
5. Collaboration and coordination:
- The government works in collaboration with various stakeholders, including healthcare providers, community organizations, and international agencies, to address public health challenges.
- This coordination ensures a comprehensive and effective approach to improving public health.
In conclusion, public health is the responsibility of the government as they have the authority, resources, and mandate to address the health needs of the population and protect the overall well-being of the society.
Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 15

Sahara Airlines and B.S.E.S. are examples of:

Detailed Solution for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 15

Introduction:
Sahara Airlines and B.S.E.S. are two examples of companies that fall under different sectors of the economy. In this response, we will analyze these companies and determine which sector they belong to.
Explanation:
Both Sahara Airlines and B.S.E.S. are well-known entities, and their categorization can be determined based on the following points:
1. Sahara Airlines:
Sahara Airlines was an Indian airline company that operated from 1993 to 2005. It was later rebranded as Air Sahara. This company can be categorized as follows:
- Sahara Airlines was initially a private sector company as it was established by a private entity.
- However, in 2000, Sahara Airlines was acquired by the government-owned Air India, making it a part of the public sector.
- Therefore, Sahara Airlines can be considered as an example of both private and public sectors.
2. B.S.E.S.:
B.S.E.S. stands for Bombay Suburban Electric Supply, which is an electricity distribution company in Mumbai, India. Its categorization is as follows:
- B.S.E.S. is a privately-owned company that operates in the electricity distribution sector.
- It is not owned or controlled by the government, making it a part of the private sector.
Conclusion:
Based on the above analysis, we can conclude that Sahara Airlines is an example of both the private and public sectors, while B.S.E.S. falls under the private sector. Therefore, the correct answer to the question is option B: Private Sector.
Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 16

Name the sector, which does not produce goods but supports the production process ?

Detailed Solution for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 16

The sector which does not produce goods but supports the production process is the Tertiary sector. This sector is also known as the service sector and it plays a crucial role in facilitating the production and distribution of goods.
Here is a detailed explanation of the Tertiary sector:
Definition:
The tertiary sector refers to the sector of the economy that provides services rather than producing goods. It includes a wide range of activities such as transportation, communication, banking, insurance, healthcare, education, tourism, hospitality, and many more.
Role in the production process:
The tertiary sector supports the production process in the following ways:
1. Transportation and logistics: It ensures the smooth movement of goods from the place of production to the place of consumption through various modes of transportation like road, rail, air, and water.
2. Communication: It facilitates effective communication between different stakeholders involved in the production process, such as suppliers, manufacturers, distributors, and customers.
3. Banking and finance: It provides financial services like loans, credit, and investment opportunities to businesses for their production activities.
4. Insurance: It protects businesses from potential risks and uncertainties by providing insurance coverage for their assets, goods, and employees.
5. Healthcare and education: It ensures the well-being and skill development of the workforce, which is essential for the production of goods.
6. Tourism and hospitality: It supports the production process by providing services to tourists and travelers, contributing to the growth of the economy.
7. Consultancy and professional services: It offers expert advice and specialized services to businesses to enhance their production efficiency and effectiveness.
Conclusion:
The tertiary sector plays a critical role in supporting the production process by providing various services that are essential for the smooth functioning of the economy. While the primary sector produces raw materials and the secondary sector transforms them into finished goods, the tertiary sector ensures the efficient distribution and utilization of these goods.
Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 17

Hidden unemployment is also called

Detailed Solution for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 17
Hidden Unemployment (Disguised Unemployment)
Hidden unemployment, also known as disguised unemployment, refers to a situation where individuals appear to be employed but are actually unemployed or underemployed. It is characterized by the underutilization of labor resources within an economy. Here is a detailed explanation of hidden unemployment:
Definition:
Hidden unemployment refers to a situation where individuals are employed in jobs that do not fully utilize their skills and capabilities, resulting in lower productivity levels. These individuals may be working part-time or in jobs that are below their qualifications, leading to a waste of human resources.
Characteristics of Hidden Unemployment:
Hidden unemployment is characterized by several key features, including:
1. Underutilization of Labor: In hidden unemployment, the labor force is not fully utilized, leading to a situation where there is excess labor supply relative to the demand for labor.
2. Low Productivity: Individuals in hidden unemployment are often engaged in jobs that do not require their full skillset or educational qualifications, resulting in lower productivity levels.
3. Lack of Job Satisfaction: Hidden unemployment can lead to job dissatisfaction as individuals may not be able to utilize their skills and abilities to their full potential.
4. Reduced Economic Output: The underutilization of labor resources in hidden unemployment leads to a decrease in overall economic output and efficiency.
Examples of Hidden Unemployment:
Hidden unemployment can be observed in various sectors and occupations, including:
1. Agriculture: In rural areas, there may be a large number of farmers working on small plots of land, leading to disguised unemployment as the land cannot be fully utilized.
2. Informal Sector: Many individuals in the informal sector may be employed in low-paying jobs or working part-time, resulting in underutilization of labor resources.
3. Underemployment: Individuals who are working part-time or in jobs that do not match their qualifications can also be considered as hidden unemployed.
Impact and Solutions:
Hidden unemployment can have several negative impacts on the economy, including reduced productivity, wasted human resources, and lower economic growth. To address this issue, some potential solutions include:
1. Skills Development: Providing training and skill development programs to individuals can help them acquire the necessary skills to access better job opportunities and reduce hidden unemployment.
2. Economic Diversification: Promoting the diversification of the economy can create new job opportunities and reduce hidden unemployment in specific sectors.
3. Investment in Infrastructure: Developing infrastructure projects can stimulate economic growth and create more job opportunities, reducing hidden unemployment.
4. Education and Awareness: Increasing awareness about the importance of matching skills with job opportunities can help individuals make more informed career choices and reduce hidden unemployment.
In conclusion, hidden unemployment, also known as disguised unemployment, is a situation where individuals appear to be employed but are actually unemployed or underemployed. It is characterized by the underutilization of labor resources and can have negative impacts on the economy. Implementing measures such as skills development, economic diversification, investment in infrastructure, and education and awareness can help reduce hidden unemployment and promote more productive and efficient labor markets.
Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 18

Railway is an example of :

Detailed Solution for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 18
Railway is an example of:
Railways can be categorized under the public sector. Here's why:
Public Sector:
- Railways are owned and operated by the government.
- They are established to provide transportation services to the general public.
- The government invests in the development, maintenance, and expansion of railway infrastructure.
- The fares and charges for railway services are set by the government and are generally subsidized to make them affordable for the public.
- Railways play a crucial role in the economic development of a country by facilitating the movement of goods and passengers.
- The government has control over the policies, regulations, and overall functioning of the railways.
- Railways are considered a public utility and are essential for the overall welfare and connectivity of the nation.
Therefore, the correct answer is B: Public Sector.
Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 19

Which of the following services is not based on information technology ?

Detailed Solution for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 19
Explanation:
The service that is not based on information technology is "White washing."
Reasons:
- ATM booths: ATM booths provide automated banking services that rely on information technology to process transactions and provide account information.
- Call centre: Call centres use information technology to handle incoming and outgoing customer calls, manage customer data, and provide customer support or sales services.
- Internet cafe: Internet cafes are establishments where customers can access the internet and use computer services. These cafes heavily rely on information technology to provide internet connectivity and computer access.
White washing: White washing is a service that involves cleaning and painting walls or surfaces. It does not rely on information technology as it is a manual process that does not involve the use of computers or digital systems.
In conclusion, out of the given options, "White washing" is the service that is not based on information technology.
Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 20

What will happen if the government fails to provide 100 days employment under NREGA ?

Detailed Solution for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 - Question 20
What will happen if the government fails to provide 100 days employment under NREGA?
If the government fails to provide 100 days employment under NREGA, the following consequences may occur:
1. No extra benefit will be given: The government will not provide any additional benefits to the individuals who were supposed to receive employment under NREGA.
2. The officer-in-charge will be punished: The officer responsible for the implementation of NREGA may face disciplinary action or punishment for the failure to provide the guaranteed employment.
3. Unemployment allowance will be given: In case the government fails to provide employment as per the guarantees of NREGA, the affected individuals may be eligible to receive an unemployment allowance. This allowance is provided to compensate for the loss of employment opportunities.
4. Foodgrains may be provided: In some cases, if the government fails to provide employment, it may compensate by providing foodgrains or other essential commodities to the affected individuals. This is done to ensure that their basic needs are met during the period of unemployment.
It is important to note that the specific consequences may vary depending on the policies and regulations of each state or region within the country.
165 videos|297 docs|142 tests
Information about Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 Page
In this test you can find the Exam questions for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2 solved & explained in the simplest way possible. Besides giving Questions and answers for Test: Sectors of the Indian Economy - 2, EduRev gives you an ample number of Online tests for practice
165 videos|297 docs|142 tests
Download as PDF

How to Prepare for UPSC

Read our guide to prepare for UPSC which is created by Toppers & the best Teachers
Download the FREE EduRev App
Track your progress, build streaks, highlight & save important lessons and more!