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Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - UPSC MCQ


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20 Questions MCQ Test Old & New NCERTs for IAS Preparation (Must Read) - Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City

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Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 1

A Sufi lodge often used as a rest house for travellers and a place where people come to discuss spiritual matters, get the blessings of saints and hear sufi music. What is this place called?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 1

The place described in the question is called a Khangah or a Sufi lodge. Here is a detailed explanation:
Khangah:
- A khangah is a type of Sufi lodge where people gather to discuss spiritual matters, seek blessings from saints, and listen to Sufi music.
- It serves as a rest house for travelers and a place for spiritual retreat.
- Khangahs are often associated with Sufism, a mystical branch of Islam that focuses on the inward search for God and the purification of the soul.
- These lodges are usually located in areas where Sufi saints have lived or are buried.
- People visit khangahs to seek guidance, engage in spiritual practices, and connect with the teachings of Sufi masters.
- The atmosphere in a khangah is typically serene and conducive to meditation and reflection.
Other Options:
- A cul-de-sac is a dead-end street or road with only one outlet.
- An idgah is an open-air prayer ground where Muslims gather for special prayers, particularly during festivals.
- A dargah is a shrine built over the grave of a Muslim saint or Sufi master, where people come to seek blessings and offer prayers.
Therefore, the correct answer is C: Khangah.
Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 2

What is an open prayer place of Muslims meant for Id prayers called?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 2
Answer:
An open prayer place for Muslims meant for Id prayers is called an "Idgah". Here is a detailed explanation of the term:
Definition:
- An Idgah is an open space or ground where Muslims gather to offer special prayers on the occasion of Id-ul-Fitr and Id-ul-Adha.
- It is a designated place for the community to come together and perform the prayers as a congregation.
Key Points:
- Idgah is derived from the Urdu and Persian words "Id" meaning festival and "gah" meaning place or ground.
- The term is commonly used in the Indian subcontinent.
- Idgahs are usually located outside the city or in open spaces to accommodate a large number of worshippers.
- These prayer grounds are specifically built for the purpose of offering prayers on Id occasions and are not used for regular daily prayers.
- Idgahs often have a simple layout with open-air arrangements and minimal architectural structures.
- The prayer gathering on Id is led by an Imam and includes a sermon and the performance of special prayers known as the Salat al-Eid.
Conclusion:
- An Idgah is an important place for Muslims to come together and offer prayers during Id celebrations.
- It serves as a central location for the community to unite in worship and celebrate the festival.
Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 3

From the following list of options, what is a Street with a dead end called?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 3
Answer:
A street with a dead end is called a cul-de-sac. Here is a detailed explanation of the term:
Definition:
A cul-de-sac is a street or road with a dead end, meaning it does not connect to another street or road.
Explanation:
- Cul-de-sac is a French term that translates to "bottom of a bag" or "bottom of a sack." This term is used to describe a street layout that forms a loop or a U-shape, with the entry and exit points being the same.
- Cul-de-sacs are typically found in residential areas and are designed to limit through traffic and improve safety.
- These streets often have a small turning circle or roundabout at the end, allowing vehicles to turn around and exit the same way they entered.
- Cul-de-sacs are often preferred by families with young children or those seeking a quieter and safer neighborhood, as they tend to have less traffic and provide a sense of community.
Characteristics of a cul-de-sac:
- Dead end: A cul-de-sac has only one entry and exit point, meaning it does not connect to any other streets.
- Turning circle or roundabout: At the end of the cul-de-sac, there is a circular space that allows vehicles to turn around and exit.
- Residential area: Cul-de-sacs are commonly found in residential neighborhoods, providing a more secluded and safe environment.
- Limited through traffic: Due to the dead-end nature, cul-de-sacs do not experience heavy traffic flow, making them quieter and safer for residents.
- Sense of community: The loop or U-shape of a cul-de-sac often fosters a sense of community among the residents, as they share a common space.
Advantages and disadvantages of cul-de-sacs:
Advantages:
- Reduced traffic: Cul-de-sacs offer a quieter environment due to limited through traffic.
- Safety: With only one entry and exit point, cul-de-sacs tend to have slower speeds and fewer accidents.
- Sense of community: The layout of cul-de-sacs encourages interaction and a close-knit community among residents.
Disadvantages:
- Limited connectivity: Cul-de-sacs do not provide direct access to other streets, which can increase travel distances.
- Increased driving time: Residents of cul-de-sacs may have to navigate a longer route to reach their destinations.
- Limited parking: The circular space at the end of a cul-de-sac may restrict parking options for residents.
In conclusion, a street with a dead end is called a cul-de-sac. These streets offer limited through traffic, increased safety, and a sense of community for the residents. However, they also have limitations in terms of connectivity and parking.
Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 4

Which was the most splendid capital built by Shah Jahan?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 4
The most splendid capital built by Shah Jahan was Shajahanabad.
Explanation:

  • Shah Jahan, the fifth Mughal emperor of India, built several magnificent cities during his reign.

  • Among them, the most splendid capital was Shajahanabad.

  • Shajahanabad, now known as Old Delhi, was founded in 1639 and served as the Mughal capital until 1857.

  • It was built on the banks of the Yamuna River and was designed to be a symbol of Mughal grandeur and power.

  • Shajahanabad was known for its impressive architecture, including the iconic Red Fort, which served as the residence of the Mughal emperors.

  • The city also boasted numerous beautiful mosques, gardens, and palaces.

  • One of the most famous structures in Shajahanabad is the Jama Masjid, one of the largest mosques in India.

  • Shah Jahan's vision for the city was to create a harmonious blend of Persian, Indian, and Islamic architectural styles.

  • Shajahanabad became a center of culture, art, and commerce, attracting people from all over the Mughal Empire.

  • Today, the remnants of this splendid capital can still be seen in the historic streets, monuments, and structures of Old Delhi.

Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 5

Which building was made of red stone near Delhi, which was built as a palace fort in Shajahanabad, also a residence of Mughal emperors of India?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 5
Building made of red stone near Delhi
The building made of red stone near Delhi, which was built as a palace fort in Shajahanabad and also served as the residence of Mughal emperors of India, is the Red Fort.
Red Fort
The Red Fort, also known as Lal Qila, is an iconic historical monument located in Old Delhi. It was built by the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan in the 17th century as a fortified palace complex. Here are some key details about the Red Fort:
1. Location: The Red Fort is situated in the heart of Old Delhi, near the banks of the Yamuna River.
2. Architecture: The fort is made of red sandstone, which gives it its distinctive appearance. It features intricate carvings, decorative elements, and a blend of Persian, Indian, and European architectural styles.
3. Layout: The Red Fort covers a vast area of about 254 acres and is enclosed by high walls. It is designed in a rectangular shape, with several buildings and structures within its premises.
4. Important Structures: Within the Red Fort complex, there are several notable structures, including:
- Diwan-i-Aam: The Hall of Public Audience, where the emperor would address the general public and listen to their grievances.
- Diwan-i-Khas: The Hall of Private Audience, used for meetings with important dignitaries and foreign ambassadors.
- Rang Mahal: The Palace of Colors, which was the residence of the emperor's wives and concubines.
- Mumtaz Mahal: The palace dedicated to Empress Mumtaz Mahal, Shah Jahan's beloved wife.
- Moti Masjid: The Pearl Mosque, a small but elegant mosque within the fort complex.
5. UNESCO World Heritage Site: The Red Fort was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2007 for its cultural and historical significance.
6. Independence Day Celebrations: Every year on 15th August, India's Independence Day, the Prime Minister hoists the national flag at the Red Fort and delivers a speech to the nation.
The Red Fort is not only a symbol of India's rich history and architectural grandeur but also holds immense cultural and national importance. It attracts numerous visitors who come to admire its beauty and learn about the Mughal era in India.
Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 6

What is the importance of Jama Masjid, situated in Delhi?

Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 7

The streets of Delhi aren't mere streets, they are the album of a painter. Name the poet who wrote these words.

Detailed Solution for Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 7
Answer: C. Mir Taqi Mir
Explanation:
- The poet who wrote the lines "The streets of Delhi aren't mere streets, they are the album of a painter" is Mir Taqi Mir.
- Mir Taqi Mir was a renowned Urdu poet who lived during the 18th century.
- He is considered one of the greatest poets in the history of Urdu literature.
- Mir's poetry often focused on themes of love, loss, and the beauty of the world around him.
- In the mentioned lines, Mir compares the streets of Delhi to an album of a painter, implying that they are filled with beauty and artistry.
- Mir's poetry is known for its depth of emotion and vivid imagery, and his words continue to resonate with readers and poetry lovers to this day.
Additional Information:
- Mirza Ghalib, another famous Urdu poet, is often confused with Mir Taqi Mir. However, the lines in question are not written by him.
- Kabir Das and Sur Das were renowned poets of the Bhakti movement in India, but they are not associated with the mentioned lines.
Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 8

Which is this building in Delhi, supposed to be one of the finest pieces of architecture with minarets and full domes 

Detailed Solution for Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 8

Built in 1656, it is an eloquent reminder of the Mughal religious fervour. Its spacious courtyard holds thousands of the faithful who offer their prayers here. It's also known as 'Masjid-i-Jahanuma' or 'Mosque commanding view of the world'. It was designed as Emperor Shahjahan's principal mosque.

Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 9

Complete the following. After defeating the ____________, British gained controlof Delhui in 1803.

Detailed Solution for Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 9
Defeating the Marathas
The British gained control of Delhi in 1803 after defeating the Marathas. Here is a detailed explanation:
1. Background:
- The Marathas were a Hindu warrior group who established a powerful empire in India during the 17th and 18th centuries.
- By the late 18th century, the Marathas had become the dominant power in India and controlled a large part of the subcontinent.
2. British Expansion in India:
- The British East India Company had been expanding its influence in India since the early 17th century.
- The company gradually gained control over various regions through alliances, diplomacy, and warfare.
3. Conflict with the Marathas:
- The British and the Marathas had several conflicts, especially over territorial control and trade.
- The Marathas, under the leadership of Mahadji Scindia and the Peshwas, posed a significant challenge to British expansion in India.
4. Battle of Delhi:
- In 1803, the British forces, led by General Gerard Lake, launched an attack on Delhi, which was then under the control of the Marathas.
- The Maratha forces, commanded by Daulat Rao Scindia, were defeated by the superior British military tactics and firepower.
- After the battle, the British gained control of Delhi and the surrounding territories.
5. Consequences:
- The defeat of the Marathas at Delhi was a significant blow to their power and influence in northern India.
- It paved the way for further British expansion and consolidation of their rule in the region.
- The British established a residency in Delhi, which became a symbol of their authority over the Mughal Empire.
In conclusion, the British gained control of Delhi in 1803 after defeating the Marathas in the Battle of Delhi. This victory furthered the British expansion in India and marked a decline in the Maratha power.
Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 10

Before Delhi was made the cpaital of India, which was the other city that was the capital of British India ?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 10
Before Delhi was made the capital of India, the other city that was the capital of British India was Calcutta.
Explanation:
- British India refers to the period when India was under the direct rule of the British Empire from 1858 to 1947.
- During this time, the capital of British India changed several times.
- Calcutta, now known as Kolkata, was the first city to serve as the capital of British India.
- Calcutta became the capital in 1772 and remained so until 1911.
- The British East India Company established its headquarters in Calcutta, and it became a major center for trade and administration.
- Calcutta was strategically located on the eastern coast of India, making it a convenient base for British operations in the region.
- However, in 1911, the capital was shifted from Calcutta to Delhi for various reasons, including political and administrative considerations.
- Delhi was seen as a more central location and had historical significance as the seat of power for many previous Indian empires.
- The decision to make Delhi the capital was announced during the Delhi Durbar in 1911, and the transition was completed in 1912.
- Since then, Delhi has remained the capital of India, both during the British colonial period and after India gained independence in 1947.
Key Points:
- Calcutta served as the capital of British India from 1772 to 1911.
- Delhi became the capital of India in 1911, replacing Calcutta.
- Calcutta was strategically located and a major center for trade and administration.
- The decision to shift the capital to Delhi was made for political and administrative reasons.
- Delhi has remained the capital of India since 1911.
Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 11

In which year did Delhi became the capital of British India ?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 11
Delhi becoming the capital of British India

In the year 1911, Delhi became the capital of British India. This decision was made by the British government during the reign of King George V. The capital was shifted from Calcutta (now Kolkata) to Delhi for various reasons:


Reasons for the shift:
- Strategic Location: Delhi was located at the center of British India, making it a more suitable administrative capital.
- Symbolic Importance: Delhi had historical and cultural significance as the capital of various empires throughout history, including the Mughals. The British saw this as an opportunity to establish their authority and showcase their power.
- Modern Infrastructure: The British government wanted to develop Delhi as a modern city with improved infrastructure, such as wide roads, railway connections, and government buildings.
- Political Considerations: Shifting the capital to Delhi also aimed to balance the influence of Calcutta, which was a center for Indian nationalism and anti-British sentiment.
- Coronation Durbar: The shift in capital was announced during the Coronation Durbar of King George V in 1911, which was held in Delhi. This grand event marked the formal declaration of Delhi as the capital of British India.

Overall, the decision to make Delhi the capital of British India in 1911 had both practical and political motivations. It played a significant role in shaping the city's development and its subsequent importance as the capital of independent India after 1947.

Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 12

What is the festival of flowers called ?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 12

The Festival of Flowers


The festival of flowers is called Gulfaroshan. It is a popular celebration that revolves around the beauty and fragrance of flowers. Here are some key details about this festival:


Meaning and Significance

  • Gulfaroshan is a Persian term that translates to "flower seller" in English.

  • The festival is a celebration of the vibrant colors and delicate fragrances of flowers.

  • It is a way to appreciate the beauty of nature and the joy it brings to our lives.


Traditions and Customs

  • Gulfaroshan is typically celebrated during the spring season when flowers are in full bloom.

  • People decorate their homes, temples, and public spaces with various flowers.

  • Flower markets are set up where people can buy and sell different types of flowers.

  • Floral arrangements and garlands are made to adorn idols, shrines, and altars.

  • Flower shows and competitions are organized to showcase the best flower displays.

  • People also exchange flower bouquets and gifts as a symbol of love and affection.


Cultural Significance

  • Gulfaroshan is not only a celebration of flowers but also a reflection of the culture and traditions of the community.

  • It promotes a sense of unity and joy as people come together to appreciate the beauty of nature.

  • The festival also holds religious significance for some communities, where flowers are offered as a form of worship.


Conclusion

Gulfaroshan, also known as the festival of flowers, is a vibrant celebration that showcases the beauty and fragrance of nature. It is a time for people to come together, decorate their surroundings, and appreciate the joy that flowers bring to their lives. The festival holds cultural and religious significance, making it an important part of the community's traditions.

Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 13

What term from the list given below can be given to the rebirth of art and living. It is often described as a period of high creativity.

Detailed Solution for Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 13
Answer:
The term from the given list that can be given to the rebirth of art and living, often described as a period of high creativity, is the Renaissance.
Explanation:
During the Renaissance, which occurred between the 14th and 17th centuries, there was a significant cultural and intellectual movement in Europe. This period marked a transition from the medieval to the modern world and saw a renewed interest in classical learning, humanism, and artistic expression.
The Renaissance was characterized by several key factors:
1. Artistic Revival: The Renaissance witnessed a revival of interest in the arts, including painting, sculpture, and architecture. Artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Raphael emerged during this period, producing timeless masterpieces.
2. Humanism: Humanism became a central philosophy during the Renaissance, emphasizing the importance of human potential and achievement. It celebrated human intellect, education, and individualism.
3. Scientific Advancements: The Renaissance was marked by advancements in science, with scholars like Galileo Galilei and Nicolaus Copernicus challenging traditional beliefs and revolutionizing our understanding of the natural world.
4. Literary and Intellectual Progress: The Renaissance also saw a flourishing of literature, with prominent writers like William Shakespeare and Dante Alighieri contributing significantly to the literary canon.
5. Social and Political Changes: The Renaissance was not solely an artistic and intellectual movement but also brought about social and political transformations. It led to the rise of powerful city-states, the growth of the merchant class, and the spread of ideas through the printing press.
The Renaissance marked a period of immense creativity and innovation, with its impact still being felt today. It is often regarded as one of the most significant periods in human history, influencing art, culture, and society in profound ways.
Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 14

What is the period from 1830 to 1857 genreally referrd to as with respect to Delhi ?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 14
The period from 1830 to 1857 in Delhi is generally referred to as the Delhi Renaissance.
The Delhi Renaissance refers to a period of cultural, intellectual, and artistic revival that took place in Delhi during the mid-19th century. This period saw significant developments and changes in various aspects of Delhi's society and culture. Here are the key points to understand this period:
1. Socio-cultural revival:
During this time, Delhi witnessed a revival of its socio-cultural life, with the establishment of literary and cultural societies, intellectual discussions, and the promotion of traditional arts and crafts.
2. Literary and intellectual activities:
Prominent poets, writers, and intellectuals emerged during this period, contributing to the development of Urdu and Persian literature. Delhi became a center for literary activities and intellectual discussions.
3. Educational reforms:
Efforts were made to modernize education in Delhi, with the establishment of schools and colleges. Western education and scientific ideas started to gain prominence.
4. Architectural developments:
Several architectural projects were undertaken during this period, combining traditional and modern architectural styles. The construction of public buildings, mosques, and palaces showcased the architectural renaissance in Delhi.
5. Economic growth:
Delhi witnessed economic growth during this period, with the expansion of trade and commerce. The introduction of modern infrastructure and transportation systems contributed to the economic development of the city.
6. Influence of European ideas:
European ideas and thoughts started to influence the intellectual and cultural landscape of Delhi. The exchange of ideas with European scholars and travelers brought new perspectives to Delhi's society.
Overall, the Delhi Renaissance from 1830 to 1857 marked a period of cultural, intellectual, and artistic revival in Delhi, showcasing the city's rich heritage and its ability to adapt and embrace new ideas.
Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 15

When the angry lions entered the town, they killed helpless. ''And burned houses. Hordes on men and women, commoners and noblemem, poured out of Delhi from the three gates and took shelter in small communities and tombs outside the city ''. Who is the poet Ghalib referring to as angry lions here ?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 15
Poet Ghalib is referring to the British as angry lions.
Explanation:
The poet Ghalib is using a metaphorical language to describe a situation where a group of powerful and aggressive beings enter a town and cause destruction. In this context, the angry lions symbolize the British imperialists who invaded India during the colonial period.
Key points:
- The angry lions represent a group of powerful and aggressive beings.
- They enter the town and cause destruction.
- The poet Ghalib is using metaphorical language to describe this situation.
- The metaphor suggests that the British imperialists, who invaded India, are being referred to as angry lions.
- The British imperialists were known for their oppressive rule and the devastation they caused in India.
- Therefore, option A, which states that the angry lions refer to the British, is the correct answer.
Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 16

Where did the British exile Bahdadur Shah Zafar to ?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 16
British exile of Bahadur Shah Zafar

Bahadur Shah Zafar, the last Mughal emperor of India, was exiled by the British after the Indian Rebellion of 1857. He was sent to Burma (now Myanmar) where he spent the remainder of his life.


Reasons for exile

  • Bahadur Shah Zafar was seen as a figurehead and symbol of the rebellion against British rule in India.

  • The British held him responsible for the uprising and wanted to remove any potential threat to their control.

  • Exiling him to Burma was a way to isolate him from his supporters and prevent any further rebellion.


Life in exile

  • Zafar was taken as a prisoner by the British and transported to Rangoon (now Yangon) in Burma.

  • He lived in captivity in a small house with limited freedom.

  • Despite his exile, Zafar continued to be revered by many Indians, who saw him as a symbol of resistance against British oppression.

  • Zafar passed away in 1862 in Rangoon, and his tomb is now a place of pilgrimage for those who still remember his struggle.


Therefore, the correct answer is C: Burma (now Myanmar).

Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 17

Name the mosque converted into a bakery by the British ?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 17
The mosque converted into a bakery by the British was Zinat-al-Masjid.
Explanation:
Here is a detailed explanation of the answer:
Conversion of Mosques by the British:
During the British colonial rule in India, several mosques were converted to other purposes. One such mosque was Zinat-al-Masjid, which was transformed into a bakery.
Zinat-al-Masjid:
1. Zinat-al-Masjid is a historic mosque located in Delhi, India.
2. It was constructed during the reign of Emperor Aurangzeb in the late 17th century.
3. The mosque is known for its beautiful architectural features, including intricate carvings and delicate marble work.
4. However, during the British rule, Zinat-al-Masjid was converted into a bakery.
British Influence on Mosques:
1. The British colonial administration in India often utilized religious structures for their own purposes, disregarding their religious significance.
2. Mosques, temples, and other religious buildings were repurposed for various activities, including bakeries, offices, and even military barracks.
Zinat-al-Masjid as a Bakery:
1. The conversion of Zinat-al-Masjid into a bakery was part of the British policy to assert dominance and control over the Indian population.
2. By converting a mosque into a bakery, the British undermined the religious sentiments of the local Muslim community.
3. This act of the British sparked outrage and protests among the Muslim population, who considered it a disrespectful act towards their faith.
In conclusion, the mosque that was converted into a bakery by the British was Zinat-al-Masjid. This conversion was a symbol of British oppression and disregard for religious sentiments during their colonial rule in India.
Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 18

After 1857 for how many years no worship was not allowed ?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 18
After 1857, for how many years was worship not allowed?
The correct answer is option A: 5 years.
Here is a detailed explanation:
Background:
The year 1857 is significant in Indian history as it marked the beginning of the Indian Rebellion against British rule, also known as the Sepoy Mutiny or the First War of Independence. The rebellion was a widespread uprising against British colonial rule in India.
Impact on Worship:
During and after the rebellion, there were several changes and restrictions imposed by the British authorities. One of the significant impacts was the restrictions on religious practices and worship. The British administration implemented measures to suppress any potential uprisings or rebellions in the future.
Duration of Worship Restrictions:
The worship restrictions after 1857 were in place for a certain period of time. The correct answer states that worship was not allowed for 5 years. This means that religious ceremonies, rituals, and public worship were prohibited during this period.
Other Options:
The other options provided in the question are 8, 10, and 20 years. However, the correct answer is 5 years.
In conclusion, after the events of 1857, worship was not allowed for a period of 5 years. This restriction was part of the British administration's efforts to maintain control and prevent any future uprisings.
Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 19

How was the western walls of Shahjahanabad broken ?

Detailed Solution for Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 19
Explanation:
The western walls of Shahjahanabad were broken for several reasons.
Reasons for breaking the western walls:
- Railway construction: The western wall was broken to establish a railway line, which required the expansion of the city beyond the walls. This was done to improve transportation and connectivity in the region.
- City expansion: Breaking the western walls allowed the city to expand beyond its confined boundaries, accommodating the growing population and urban development.
- Construction of the Parliament House: It is not mentioned in the given options but one of the reasons for breaking the western walls was to construct the Parliament House. This decision was made to establish a central government institution and facilitate administrative activities.
- British residential suite: Another reason for breaking the western walls was to construct a residential suite for the British Governor General. This was done to provide suitable housing for the British administrative authorities.
Conclusion:
The western walls of Shahjahanabad were broken primarily to establish a railway line and allow the city to expand. However, other reasons like the construction of the Parliament House and the British Governor General's residential suite also contributed to the decision.
Important Questions Test: Colonialism & the City - Question 20

Over 100,000 Indian princes and British officers gathered at this place. In the image given. What was the occasion for this Durbar?

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