M.C.Q.1


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10 Questions MCQ Test Additional Documents & Tests for CLAT | M.C.Q.1

M.C.Q.1 for CLAT 2022 is part of Additional Documents & Tests for CLAT preparation. The M.C.Q.1 questions and answers have been prepared according to the CLAT exam syllabus.The M.C.Q.1 MCQs are made for CLAT 2022 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises, MCQs and online tests for M.C.Q.1 below.
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M.C.Q.1 - Question 1

Many business offices are located in buildings having 2-8 floors. If a building has more than 3 floors, it has a lift. If the above statements are true, which of the following must be true?
 

Detailed Solution for M.C.Q.1 - Question 1

 The question states that if the building has more than three floors than it has lift. Then the buildings, which have say five floors they have a second floor also, thus first option is wrong. The 2nd is the right answer. The third option is wrong, using same logic as in case of the first option. The 4th cannot be definitely true, because had it been the case, then even the building with two floors would have had lifts.

M.C.Q.1 - Question 2

A highly cohesive work group is a prerequisite for high team performance. Sociologists point out that the association between success and group cohesion owes to the support individual team members give to one another and their acceptance of the group's activities and goals.
Each of the following, if true, either supports or cannot weaken the sociologists' assumption about the relationship between success and cohesion EXCEPT

Detailed Solution for M.C.Q.1 - Question 2

The first option states that a group of Japanese researchers found that successful work teams were led by dominant leaders. Thus it weakens the main question, which points out that that work cohesiveness is a prerequisite for high team performance.

M.C.Q.1 - Question 3

There are numerous reasons why individuals want to run their own businesses. Some foresee more personal satisfaction if they succeed in launching their own business, while others are mainly interested in the prospect of larger financial rewards. Since 1980s and early 1990s, tax regulation and liberal policies have encouraged increasing number of venture capitalists and entrepreneurs to start new enterprises. Since 1990, one and a half million new ventures have been started. Not all have succeeded.
The above statement makes which of the following assumptions?

Detailed Solution for M.C.Q.1 - Question 3

None of the given option seems to be a valid assumption; hence the 4th option that is none of these is the answer. Option A is a general statement

M.C.Q.1 - Question 4

A factory was trying out a new process for producing one of its products, with the goal of reducing production costs. A trial production run using the new process showed a fifteen percent reduction in costs compared with past performance using the standard process. The production managers therefore concluded that the new process did produce a cost savings.
 Which of the following, if true, casts most doubt on the production managers' conclusion?
 

Detailed Solution for M.C.Q.1 - Question 4

The managers concluded that the new process produced a cost savings on the basis of a trial run of the process in which costs were 15 percent lower than they had been previously. You are asked to identify something that casts doubt on their conclusion.

Choice C is the best answer. If production costs at the factory fell for a similar product that was produced without using the new process, it is more doubtful that the observed production cost reductions achieved during the trial run were actually produced by the new process.
Choice A is incorrect; the fact that the managers had hoped for cost reduction of fifty percent does not cast any doubt on their conclusion that the new process had produced at least some savings. Choice B is incorrect since finding the source of the cost savings in the trial shows that the savings were no mere accident and so reinforces the managers' conclusion. Choices D and E are incorrect since by emphasizing that certain aspects of the product — its design and raw materials — were the same in the standard process and the new process, these two answer choices support, rather than cast doubt on, the conclusion that the process itself produced the savings.
 

M.C.Q.1 - Question 5

 In South Asia the ruling classes ignore the quotidian at their own peril. Just ask them about onions. This autumn the humble bulb has challenged titans. 
The trouble began when unseasonably heavy rains followed drought across the onion-growing belt of north and central India. That not only all but destroyed the crop; the wet caused more than a third of onions in storage to rot. The result is a severe shortage of onions across India, as a result of which prices more than tripled. 
This hardly threatens famine – something the green revolution abolished decades ago by boosting wheat and rice yields. Yet remove the onion and you struggle to imagine Indian cuisine. It forms the base for curries and biryanis. When a poor Indian has nothing else to eat, at least she has an onion with a chapati or two. 
In late September the Indian government slapped a ban on exports of onions. That briefly brought down prices, helping consumers. But it has angered farmers and exporters in Gujarat, Maharashtra and Karnataka, for whom onions are an essential cash crop. 
In South Asia, a region riven by geopolitical fault lines, there are international implications. Upon hearing of India’s export ban, Bangladesh’s strongwoman, Sheikh Hasina Wajed, admonished the Indian government for giving no warning. Her country counts on Indian onions, whose price at one point had risen fivefold in the markets of Dhaka, Bangladesh’s capital.

Which of the following forms the premise for the author’s argument that a shortage of onions would not cause a famine in India today?  

Detailed Solution for M.C.Q.1 - Question 5

The correct answer is (d) – there is enough wheat and rice for people to eat in India today because of the green revolution. The author states this towards the beginning of the third paragraph. While each of the other options may be true, the author does not base the conclusion that a shortage of onions would not cause a famine in India today, on any of the statements set out in the other options. Therefore, none of (a), (b), or (c) can be the correct answer. 

M.C.Q.1 - Question 6

In South Asia the ruling classes ignore the quotidian at their own peril. Just ask them about onions. This autumn the humble bulb has challenged titans. 
The trouble began when unseasonably heavy rains followed drought across the onion-growing belt of north and central India. That not only all but destroyed the crop; the wet caused more than a third of onions in storage to rot. The result is a severe shortage of onions across India, as a result of which prices more than tripled. 
This hardly threatens famine – something the green revolution abolished decades ago by boosting wheat and rice yields. Yet remove the onion and you struggle to imagine Indian cuisine. It forms the base for curries and biryanis. When a poor Indian has nothing else to eat, at least she has an onion with a chapati or two. 
In late September the Indian government slapped a ban on exports of onions. That briefly brought down prices, helping consumers. But it has angered farmers and exporters in Gujarat, Maharashtra and Karnataka, for whom onions are an essential cash crop. 
In South Asia, a region riven by geopolitical fault lines, there are international implications. Upon hearing of India’s export ban, Bangladesh’s strongwoman, Sheikh Hasina Wajed, admonished the Indian government for giving no warning. Her country counts on Indian onions, whose price at one point had risen fivefold in the markets of Dhaka, Bangladesh’s capital. 
  Which of the following is most likely to be true had heavy rains not followed drought across the onion-growing regions of India? 

Detailed Solution for M.C.Q.1 - Question 6

The correct answer is (c) – the onion harvest in storage would not have rotted. We can infer this from the author’s statement that “the wet caused more than a third of onions in storage to rot”. There is nothing in the passage to indicate that Bangladesh would not have needed to import onions from India had the rains not followed the drought, and so, (a) cannot be the correct answer. It was a combination of the heavy rains and the preceding drought that caused a shortage of onions (and not either of these reasons alone), and so, (b) cannot be the correct answer. The onion crop was destroyed by the drought, not the rains, and so, (d) cannot be the correct answer either. 

M.C.Q.1 - Question 7

In South Asia the ruling classes ignore the quotidian at their own peril. Just ask them about onions. This autumn the humble bulb has challenged titans. 
The trouble began when unseasonably heavy rains followed drought across the onion-growing belt of north and central India. That not only all but destroyed the crop; the wet caused more than a third of onions in storage to rot. The result is a severe shortage of onions across India, as a result of which prices more than tripled. 
This hardly threatens famine – something the green revolution abolished decades ago by boosting wheat and rice yields. Yet remove the onion and you struggle to imagine Indian cuisine. It forms the base for curries and biryanis. When a poor Indian has nothing else to eat, at least she has an onion with a chapati or two. 
In late September the Indian government slapped a ban on exports of onions. That briefly brought down prices, helping consumers. But it has angered farmers and exporters in Gujarat, Maharashtra and Karnataka, for whom onions are an essential cash crop. 
In South Asia, a region riven by geopolitical fault lines, there are international implications. Upon hearing of India’s export ban, Bangladesh’s strongwoman, Sheikh Hasina Wajed, admonished the Indian government for giving no warning. Her country counts on Indian onions, whose price at one point had risen fivefold in the markets of Dhaka, Bangladesh’s capital. 

 Which of the following most accurately expresses the main point of the passage?

Detailed Solution for M.C.Q.1 - Question 7


The correct answer is (c) - adverse weather has affected the availability of onions in India, leading to cascading effects, including in neighbouring countries. The author discusses the reason for the shortage of onions in India, how the government’s ban on exports affected farmers and exporters in India, as well as the impact upon prices of onions in Bangladesh, and the reaction of the government of Bangladesh to the ban. Since option (c) is the only option that addresses all these points, it is the correct answer. Option (a) contradicts the author’s description of how important onions are to an Indian’s diet, and so, cannot be the correct answer. There is nothing to indicate that the Bangladeshi government habitually opposes India’s export policies – the only instance we have is of their opposition to the ban on export of onions, and so, (b) cannot be the correct answer. While (d) may be true, it only touches upon one of the points the author discusses in the passage, rather than expressing the author’s main point, and so, (d) cannot be the correct answer.

M.C.Q.1 - Question 8

. In South Asia the ruling classes ignore the quotidian at their own peril. Just ask them about onions. This autumn the humble bulb has challenged titans. 
The trouble began when unseasonably heavy rains followed drought across the onion-growing belt of north and central India. That not only all but destroyed the crop; the wet caused more than a third of onions in storage to rot. The result is a severe shortage of onions across India, as a result of which prices more than tripled. 
This hardly threatens famine – something the green revolution abolished decades ago by boosting wheat and rice yields. Yet remove the onion and you struggle to imagine Indian cuisine. It forms the base for curries and biryanis. When a poor Indian has nothing else to eat, at least she has an onion with a chapati or two. 
In late September the Indian government slapped a ban on exports of onions. That briefly brought down prices, helping consumers. But it has angered farmers and exporters in Gujarat, Maharashtra and Karnataka, for whom onions are an essential cash crop. 
In South Asia, a region riven by geopolitical fault lines, there are international implications. Upon hearing of India’s export ban, Bangladesh’s strongwoman, Sheikh Hasina Wajed, admonished the Indian government for giving no warning. Her country counts on Indian onions, whose price at one point had risen fivefold in the markets of Dhaka, Bangladesh’s capital. 
  Which of the following solutions, if employed by the Bangladesh government, would counter the effect of the ban on onion exports by India on the prices of onions in Dhaka’s markets?

Detailed Solution for M.C.Q.1 - Question 8

The correct answer is (b) – increase imports of onions from other countries. The price of onions would reduce with an increase in their supply. Option (a) would have the opposite effect, that is, it would result in a reduction of supply, and so, (a) cannot be the correct answer. Option (c) would not affect the supply of, or demand for, onions either, and so, this cannot be the correct answer. Since (b) is likely to counter the effect of the ban, for the reasons discussed, (d) cannot be the correct answer. 
 

M.C.Q.1 - Question 9

 Property taxes are typically set at a flat rate per $1,000 of officially assessed value. Reassessments should be frequent in order to remove distortions that arise when property values change at differential rates. In practice, however, reassessments typically occur when they benefit the government—that is, when their effect is to increase total tax revenue. 
 If the statements above are true, which of the following describes a situation in which a reassessment should occur but is unlikely to do so?
 

Detailed Solution for M.C.Q.1 - Question 9

If most property values have dropped significantly, but some have risen slightly, a reassessment should occur (since values have changed at different rates) but is unlikely (since it will not benefit the government). Thus choice D describes the required situation and is the best answer.

M.C.Q.1 - Question 10

 To persuade consumers to buy its personal computers for home use, Super Comp has enlisted computer dealers in shopping centers to carry its product and launched a major advertising campaign that has already increased public awareness of the Super Comp brand. Despite the fact that these dealers achieved dramatically increased sales of computers last month, however, analysts doubt that Super Comp’s products accounted for much of that increase.
 Which of the following, if true, best supports the claim that the analysts’ doubt is well founded?
 

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