UPSC Exam  >  UPSC Notes  >  NCERT Textbooks (Class 6 to Class 12)  >  NCERT Textbook- Constructions

NCERT Textbook- Constructions | NCERT Textbooks (Class 6 to Class 12) - UPSC PDF Download

Download, print and study this document offline
Please wait while the PDF view is loading
 Page 1


188 MATHEMA TICS
CHAPTER 11
CONSTRUCTIONS
11.1 Introduction
In earlier chapters, the diagrams, which were necessary to prove a theorem or solving
exercises were not necessarily precise. They were drawn only to give you a feeling for
the situation and as an aid for proper reasoning. However, sometimes one needs an
accurate figure, for example - to draw a map of a building to be constructed, to design
tools, and various parts of a machine, to draw road maps etc. To draw such figures
some basic geometrical instruments are needed. You must be having a geometry box
which contains the following:
(i) A graduated scale, on one side of which centimetres and millimetres are
marked off and on the other side inches and their parts are marked off.
(ii) A pair of set - squares, one with angles 90°, 60° and 30° and other with angles
90°, 45° and 45°.
(iii) A pair of dividers (or a divider) with adjustments.
(iv) A pair of compasses (or a compass) with provision of fitting a pencil at one
end.
(v) A protractor.
Normally, all these instruments are needed in drawing a geometrical figure, such
as a triangle, a circle, a quadrilateral, a polygon, etc. with given measurements. But a
geometrical construction is the process of drawing a geometrical figure using only two
instruments – an ungraduated ruler, also called a straight edge and a compass. In
construction where measurements are also required, you may use a graduated scale
and protractor also. In this chapter, some basic constructions will be considered. These
will then be used to construct certain kinds of triangles.
2020-21
Page 2


188 MATHEMA TICS
CHAPTER 11
CONSTRUCTIONS
11.1 Introduction
In earlier chapters, the diagrams, which were necessary to prove a theorem or solving
exercises were not necessarily precise. They were drawn only to give you a feeling for
the situation and as an aid for proper reasoning. However, sometimes one needs an
accurate figure, for example - to draw a map of a building to be constructed, to design
tools, and various parts of a machine, to draw road maps etc. To draw such figures
some basic geometrical instruments are needed. You must be having a geometry box
which contains the following:
(i) A graduated scale, on one side of which centimetres and millimetres are
marked off and on the other side inches and their parts are marked off.
(ii) A pair of set - squares, one with angles 90°, 60° and 30° and other with angles
90°, 45° and 45°.
(iii) A pair of dividers (or a divider) with adjustments.
(iv) A pair of compasses (or a compass) with provision of fitting a pencil at one
end.
(v) A protractor.
Normally, all these instruments are needed in drawing a geometrical figure, such
as a triangle, a circle, a quadrilateral, a polygon, etc. with given measurements. But a
geometrical construction is the process of drawing a geometrical figure using only two
instruments – an ungraduated ruler, also called a straight edge and a compass. In
construction where measurements are also required, you may use a graduated scale
and protractor also. In this chapter, some basic constructions will be considered. These
will then be used to construct certain kinds of triangles.
2020-21
CONSTRUCTIONS 189
11.2 Basic Constructions
In Class VI, you have learnt how to construct a circle, the perpendicular bisector of a
line segment, angles of 30°, 45°, 60°, 90° and 120°, and the bisector of a given angle,
without giving any justification for these constructions. In this section, you will construct
some of these, with reasoning behind, why these constructions are valid.
Construction 11.1 : To construct the bisector of a given angle.
Given an angle ABC, we want to construct its bisector.
Steps of Construction :
1. Taking B as centre and any radius, draw an arc to intersect the rays BA and BC,
say at E and D respectively [see Fig.11.1(i)].
2. Next, taking D and E as centres and with the radius more than 
1
2
 DE, draw arcs to
intersect each other, say at F.
3. Draw the ray BF [see Fig.11.1(ii)]. This ray BF is the required bisector of the angle
ABC.
Fig. 11.1
Let us see how this method gives us the required angle bisector.
Join DF and EF.
In triangles BEF and BDF,
BE = BD (Radii of the same arc)
EF = DF (Arcs of equal radii)
BF = BF (Common)
Therefore, ?BEF ? ?BDF (SSS rule)
This gives ?EBF = ? DBF (CPCT)
2020-21
Page 3


188 MATHEMA TICS
CHAPTER 11
CONSTRUCTIONS
11.1 Introduction
In earlier chapters, the diagrams, which were necessary to prove a theorem or solving
exercises were not necessarily precise. They were drawn only to give you a feeling for
the situation and as an aid for proper reasoning. However, sometimes one needs an
accurate figure, for example - to draw a map of a building to be constructed, to design
tools, and various parts of a machine, to draw road maps etc. To draw such figures
some basic geometrical instruments are needed. You must be having a geometry box
which contains the following:
(i) A graduated scale, on one side of which centimetres and millimetres are
marked off and on the other side inches and their parts are marked off.
(ii) A pair of set - squares, one with angles 90°, 60° and 30° and other with angles
90°, 45° and 45°.
(iii) A pair of dividers (or a divider) with adjustments.
(iv) A pair of compasses (or a compass) with provision of fitting a pencil at one
end.
(v) A protractor.
Normally, all these instruments are needed in drawing a geometrical figure, such
as a triangle, a circle, a quadrilateral, a polygon, etc. with given measurements. But a
geometrical construction is the process of drawing a geometrical figure using only two
instruments – an ungraduated ruler, also called a straight edge and a compass. In
construction where measurements are also required, you may use a graduated scale
and protractor also. In this chapter, some basic constructions will be considered. These
will then be used to construct certain kinds of triangles.
2020-21
CONSTRUCTIONS 189
11.2 Basic Constructions
In Class VI, you have learnt how to construct a circle, the perpendicular bisector of a
line segment, angles of 30°, 45°, 60°, 90° and 120°, and the bisector of a given angle,
without giving any justification for these constructions. In this section, you will construct
some of these, with reasoning behind, why these constructions are valid.
Construction 11.1 : To construct the bisector of a given angle.
Given an angle ABC, we want to construct its bisector.
Steps of Construction :
1. Taking B as centre and any radius, draw an arc to intersect the rays BA and BC,
say at E and D respectively [see Fig.11.1(i)].
2. Next, taking D and E as centres and with the radius more than 
1
2
 DE, draw arcs to
intersect each other, say at F.
3. Draw the ray BF [see Fig.11.1(ii)]. This ray BF is the required bisector of the angle
ABC.
Fig. 11.1
Let us see how this method gives us the required angle bisector.
Join DF and EF.
In triangles BEF and BDF,
BE = BD (Radii of the same arc)
EF = DF (Arcs of equal radii)
BF = BF (Common)
Therefore, ?BEF ? ?BDF (SSS rule)
This gives ?EBF = ? DBF (CPCT)
2020-21
190 MATHEMA TICS
Construction 11.2 : To construct the perpendicular bisector of a given line
segment.
Given a line segment AB, we want to construct its perpendicular bisector.
Steps of Construction :
1. Taking A and B as centres and radius more than
1
2
 AB, draw arcs on both sides of the line segment
AB (to intersect each other).
2. Let these arcs intersect each other at P and Q.
Join PQ (see Fig.11.2).
3. Let PQ intersect AB at the point M. Then line
PMQ is the required perpendicular bisector of AB.
Let us see how this method gives us the
perpendicular bisector of AB.
Join A and B to both P and Q to form AP , AQ, BP
and BQ.
In triangles PAQ and PBQ,
AP = BP (Arcs of equal radii)
AQ = BQ (Arcs of equal radii)
PQ = PQ (Common)
Therefore, ? PAQ ? ? PBQ (SSS rule)
So, ? APM = ? BPM (CPCT)
Now in triangles PMA and PMB,
AP = BP (As before)
PM = PM (Common)
? APM = ? BPM (Proved above)
Therefore, ? PMA ? ? PMB (SAS rule)
So, AM = BM and ? PMA = ? PMB (CPCT)
As ? PMA + ? PMB = 180° (Linear pair axiom),
we get
? PMA = ? PMB = 90°.
Therefore, PM, that is, PMQ is the perpendicular bisector of AB.
Fig. 11.2
2020-21
Page 4


188 MATHEMA TICS
CHAPTER 11
CONSTRUCTIONS
11.1 Introduction
In earlier chapters, the diagrams, which were necessary to prove a theorem or solving
exercises were not necessarily precise. They were drawn only to give you a feeling for
the situation and as an aid for proper reasoning. However, sometimes one needs an
accurate figure, for example - to draw a map of a building to be constructed, to design
tools, and various parts of a machine, to draw road maps etc. To draw such figures
some basic geometrical instruments are needed. You must be having a geometry box
which contains the following:
(i) A graduated scale, on one side of which centimetres and millimetres are
marked off and on the other side inches and their parts are marked off.
(ii) A pair of set - squares, one with angles 90°, 60° and 30° and other with angles
90°, 45° and 45°.
(iii) A pair of dividers (or a divider) with adjustments.
(iv) A pair of compasses (or a compass) with provision of fitting a pencil at one
end.
(v) A protractor.
Normally, all these instruments are needed in drawing a geometrical figure, such
as a triangle, a circle, a quadrilateral, a polygon, etc. with given measurements. But a
geometrical construction is the process of drawing a geometrical figure using only two
instruments – an ungraduated ruler, also called a straight edge and a compass. In
construction where measurements are also required, you may use a graduated scale
and protractor also. In this chapter, some basic constructions will be considered. These
will then be used to construct certain kinds of triangles.
2020-21
CONSTRUCTIONS 189
11.2 Basic Constructions
In Class VI, you have learnt how to construct a circle, the perpendicular bisector of a
line segment, angles of 30°, 45°, 60°, 90° and 120°, and the bisector of a given angle,
without giving any justification for these constructions. In this section, you will construct
some of these, with reasoning behind, why these constructions are valid.
Construction 11.1 : To construct the bisector of a given angle.
Given an angle ABC, we want to construct its bisector.
Steps of Construction :
1. Taking B as centre and any radius, draw an arc to intersect the rays BA and BC,
say at E and D respectively [see Fig.11.1(i)].
2. Next, taking D and E as centres and with the radius more than 
1
2
 DE, draw arcs to
intersect each other, say at F.
3. Draw the ray BF [see Fig.11.1(ii)]. This ray BF is the required bisector of the angle
ABC.
Fig. 11.1
Let us see how this method gives us the required angle bisector.
Join DF and EF.
In triangles BEF and BDF,
BE = BD (Radii of the same arc)
EF = DF (Arcs of equal radii)
BF = BF (Common)
Therefore, ?BEF ? ?BDF (SSS rule)
This gives ?EBF = ? DBF (CPCT)
2020-21
190 MATHEMA TICS
Construction 11.2 : To construct the perpendicular bisector of a given line
segment.
Given a line segment AB, we want to construct its perpendicular bisector.
Steps of Construction :
1. Taking A and B as centres and radius more than
1
2
 AB, draw arcs on both sides of the line segment
AB (to intersect each other).
2. Let these arcs intersect each other at P and Q.
Join PQ (see Fig.11.2).
3. Let PQ intersect AB at the point M. Then line
PMQ is the required perpendicular bisector of AB.
Let us see how this method gives us the
perpendicular bisector of AB.
Join A and B to both P and Q to form AP , AQ, BP
and BQ.
In triangles PAQ and PBQ,
AP = BP (Arcs of equal radii)
AQ = BQ (Arcs of equal radii)
PQ = PQ (Common)
Therefore, ? PAQ ? ? PBQ (SSS rule)
So, ? APM = ? BPM (CPCT)
Now in triangles PMA and PMB,
AP = BP (As before)
PM = PM (Common)
? APM = ? BPM (Proved above)
Therefore, ? PMA ? ? PMB (SAS rule)
So, AM = BM and ? PMA = ? PMB (CPCT)
As ? PMA + ? PMB = 180° (Linear pair axiom),
we get
? PMA = ? PMB = 90°.
Therefore, PM, that is, PMQ is the perpendicular bisector of AB.
Fig. 11.2
2020-21
CONSTRUCTIONS 191
Fig. 11.3
Construction 11.3 : To construct an angle of 60
0
 at the initial point of a given
ray.
Let us take a ray AB with initial point A [see Fig. 11.3(i)]. We want to construct a ray
AC such that ? CAB = 60°. One way of doing so is given below.
Steps of Construction :
1. Taking A as centre and some radius, draw an arc
of a circle, which intersects AB, say at a point D.
2. Taking D as centre and with the same radius as
before, draw an arc intersecting the previously
drawn arc, say at a point E.
3. Draw the ray AC passing through E [see Fig 11.3 (ii)].
Then ? CAB is the required angle of 60°. Now,
let us see how this method gives us the required
angle of 60°.
Join DE.
Then, AE = AD = DE (By construction)
Therefore, ? EAD is an equilateral  triangle  and the  ? EAD,  which is the same as
? CAB is equal to 60°.
EXERCISE 11.1
1. Construct an angle of 90
0
 at the initial point of a given ray and justify the construction.
2. Construct   an angle of 45
0
 at the initial point of a given ray and justify the construction.
3. Construct the angles of the following measurements:
(i) 30° (ii) 22 
1
2
°
(iii) 15°
4. Construct the following angles and verify by measuring them by a protractor:
(i) 75° (ii) 105° (iii) 135°
5. Construct an equilateral triangle, given its side and justify the construction.
11.3 Some Constructions of Triangles
So far, some basic constructions have been considered. Next, some constructions of
triangles will be done by using the constructions given in earlier classes and given
above. Recall from the Chapter 7 that SAS, SSS, ASA and RHS rules give the
congruency of two triangles. Therefore, a triangle is unique if : (i) two sides and the
2020-21
Page 5


188 MATHEMA TICS
CHAPTER 11
CONSTRUCTIONS
11.1 Introduction
In earlier chapters, the diagrams, which were necessary to prove a theorem or solving
exercises were not necessarily precise. They were drawn only to give you a feeling for
the situation and as an aid for proper reasoning. However, sometimes one needs an
accurate figure, for example - to draw a map of a building to be constructed, to design
tools, and various parts of a machine, to draw road maps etc. To draw such figures
some basic geometrical instruments are needed. You must be having a geometry box
which contains the following:
(i) A graduated scale, on one side of which centimetres and millimetres are
marked off and on the other side inches and their parts are marked off.
(ii) A pair of set - squares, one with angles 90°, 60° and 30° and other with angles
90°, 45° and 45°.
(iii) A pair of dividers (or a divider) with adjustments.
(iv) A pair of compasses (or a compass) with provision of fitting a pencil at one
end.
(v) A protractor.
Normally, all these instruments are needed in drawing a geometrical figure, such
as a triangle, a circle, a quadrilateral, a polygon, etc. with given measurements. But a
geometrical construction is the process of drawing a geometrical figure using only two
instruments – an ungraduated ruler, also called a straight edge and a compass. In
construction where measurements are also required, you may use a graduated scale
and protractor also. In this chapter, some basic constructions will be considered. These
will then be used to construct certain kinds of triangles.
2020-21
CONSTRUCTIONS 189
11.2 Basic Constructions
In Class VI, you have learnt how to construct a circle, the perpendicular bisector of a
line segment, angles of 30°, 45°, 60°, 90° and 120°, and the bisector of a given angle,
without giving any justification for these constructions. In this section, you will construct
some of these, with reasoning behind, why these constructions are valid.
Construction 11.1 : To construct the bisector of a given angle.
Given an angle ABC, we want to construct its bisector.
Steps of Construction :
1. Taking B as centre and any radius, draw an arc to intersect the rays BA and BC,
say at E and D respectively [see Fig.11.1(i)].
2. Next, taking D and E as centres and with the radius more than 
1
2
 DE, draw arcs to
intersect each other, say at F.
3. Draw the ray BF [see Fig.11.1(ii)]. This ray BF is the required bisector of the angle
ABC.
Fig. 11.1
Let us see how this method gives us the required angle bisector.
Join DF and EF.
In triangles BEF and BDF,
BE = BD (Radii of the same arc)
EF = DF (Arcs of equal radii)
BF = BF (Common)
Therefore, ?BEF ? ?BDF (SSS rule)
This gives ?EBF = ? DBF (CPCT)
2020-21
190 MATHEMA TICS
Construction 11.2 : To construct the perpendicular bisector of a given line
segment.
Given a line segment AB, we want to construct its perpendicular bisector.
Steps of Construction :
1. Taking A and B as centres and radius more than
1
2
 AB, draw arcs on both sides of the line segment
AB (to intersect each other).
2. Let these arcs intersect each other at P and Q.
Join PQ (see Fig.11.2).
3. Let PQ intersect AB at the point M. Then line
PMQ is the required perpendicular bisector of AB.
Let us see how this method gives us the
perpendicular bisector of AB.
Join A and B to both P and Q to form AP , AQ, BP
and BQ.
In triangles PAQ and PBQ,
AP = BP (Arcs of equal radii)
AQ = BQ (Arcs of equal radii)
PQ = PQ (Common)
Therefore, ? PAQ ? ? PBQ (SSS rule)
So, ? APM = ? BPM (CPCT)
Now in triangles PMA and PMB,
AP = BP (As before)
PM = PM (Common)
? APM = ? BPM (Proved above)
Therefore, ? PMA ? ? PMB (SAS rule)
So, AM = BM and ? PMA = ? PMB (CPCT)
As ? PMA + ? PMB = 180° (Linear pair axiom),
we get
? PMA = ? PMB = 90°.
Therefore, PM, that is, PMQ is the perpendicular bisector of AB.
Fig. 11.2
2020-21
CONSTRUCTIONS 191
Fig. 11.3
Construction 11.3 : To construct an angle of 60
0
 at the initial point of a given
ray.
Let us take a ray AB with initial point A [see Fig. 11.3(i)]. We want to construct a ray
AC such that ? CAB = 60°. One way of doing so is given below.
Steps of Construction :
1. Taking A as centre and some radius, draw an arc
of a circle, which intersects AB, say at a point D.
2. Taking D as centre and with the same radius as
before, draw an arc intersecting the previously
drawn arc, say at a point E.
3. Draw the ray AC passing through E [see Fig 11.3 (ii)].
Then ? CAB is the required angle of 60°. Now,
let us see how this method gives us the required
angle of 60°.
Join DE.
Then, AE = AD = DE (By construction)
Therefore, ? EAD is an equilateral  triangle  and the  ? EAD,  which is the same as
? CAB is equal to 60°.
EXERCISE 11.1
1. Construct an angle of 90
0
 at the initial point of a given ray and justify the construction.
2. Construct   an angle of 45
0
 at the initial point of a given ray and justify the construction.
3. Construct the angles of the following measurements:
(i) 30° (ii) 22 
1
2
°
(iii) 15°
4. Construct the following angles and verify by measuring them by a protractor:
(i) 75° (ii) 105° (iii) 135°
5. Construct an equilateral triangle, given its side and justify the construction.
11.3 Some Constructions of Triangles
So far, some basic constructions have been considered. Next, some constructions of
triangles will be done by using the constructions given in earlier classes and given
above. Recall from the Chapter 7 that SAS, SSS, ASA and RHS rules give the
congruency of two triangles. Therefore, a triangle is unique if : (i) two sides and the
2020-21
192 MATHEMA TICS
included angle is given, (ii) three sides are given, (iii) two angles and the included side
is given and, (iv) in a right triangle, hypotenuse and one side is given. Y ou have already
learnt how to construct such triangles in Class VII. Now, let us consider some more
constructions of triangles. You may have noted that at least three parts of a triangle
have to be given for constructing it but not all combinations of three parts are sufficient
for the purpose. For example, if two sides and an angle (not the included angle) are
given, then it is not always possible to construct such a triangle uniquely.
Construction 11.4 : To construct a triangle, given its base, a base angle and sum
of other two sides.
Given the base BC, a base angle, say ?B and the sum AB + AC of the other two sides
of a triangle ABC, you are required to construct it.
Steps of Construction :
1. Draw the base BC and at the point B make an
angle, say XBC equal to the given angle.
2. Cut a line segment BD equal to AB + AC from
the ray BX.
3. Join DC and make an angle DCY equal to ?BDC.
4. Let CY intersect BX at A (see Fig. 11.4).
Then, ABC is the required triangle.
Let us see how you get the required triangle.
Base BC and ?B are drawn as given. Next in triangle
ACD,
?ACD = ? ADC (By construction)
Therefore, AC = AD and then
AB = BD – AD = BD – AC
AB + AC = BD
Alternative method :
Follow the first two steps as above. Then draw
perpendicular bisector PQ of CD to intersect BD at
a point A (see Fig 11.5). Join AC. Then ABC is the
required triangle. Note that A lies on the perpendicular
bisector of CD, therefore AD = AC.
Remark : The construction of the triangle is not
possible if the sum AB +  AC = BC.
Fig. 11.4
Fig. 11.5
2020-21
Read More
677 docs|673 tests

FAQs on NCERT Textbook- Constructions - NCERT Textbooks (Class 6 to Class 12) - UPSC

1. What are constructions in the context of NCERT Textbook?
Ans. In the context of the NCERT Textbook, constructions refer to the process of creating geometric figures using only a compass and a straightedge.
2. Why are constructions important in mathematics?
Ans. Constructions are important in mathematics as they help in visualizing and understanding geometric concepts. They also aid in developing logical reasoning and problem-solving skills.
3. What are some commonly used constructions in the NCERT Textbook?
Ans. Some commonly used constructions in the NCERT Textbook include constructing perpendicular bisectors, angle bisectors, and parallel lines.
4. How do constructions help in solving mathematical problems?
Ans. Constructions help in solving mathematical problems by providing a visual representation of the given data. This visual aid can assist students in identifying patterns, making connections, and finding solutions more effectively.
5. Can constructions be used to solve real-life problems?
Ans. Yes, constructions can be used to solve real-life problems. For example, constructions can be used to determine the shortest distance between two points, create accurate maps, or design architectural structures.
677 docs|673 tests
Download as PDF
Explore Courses for UPSC exam

How to Prepare for UPSC

Read our guide to prepare for UPSC which is created by Toppers & the best Teachers
Signup for Free!
Signup to see your scores go up within 7 days! Learn & Practice with 1000+ FREE Notes, Videos & Tests.
10M+ students study on EduRev
Download the FREE EduRev App
Track your progress, build streaks, highlight & save important lessons and more!
Related Searches

NCERT Textbook- Constructions | NCERT Textbooks (Class 6 to Class 12) - UPSC

,

video lectures

,

Extra Questions

,

study material

,

NCERT Textbook- Constructions | NCERT Textbooks (Class 6 to Class 12) - UPSC

,

Viva Questions

,

mock tests for examination

,

ppt

,

pdf

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

NCERT Textbook- Constructions | NCERT Textbooks (Class 6 to Class 12) - UPSC

,

shortcuts and tricks

,

practice quizzes

,

Exam

,

Summary

,

MCQs

,

Important questions

,

Semester Notes

,

Sample Paper

,

past year papers

,

Objective type Questions

,

Free

;