NCERT Textbook - Visualising Solid Shapes Class 7 Notes | EduRev

Mathematics (Maths) Class 7

Created by: Praveen Kumar

Class 7 : NCERT Textbook - Visualising Solid Shapes Class 7 Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


VISUALISING SOLID SHAPES 277 277 277 277 277
15.1  INTRODUCTION: PLANE FIGURES AND SOLID SHAPES
In this chapter, you will classify figures you have seen in terms of what is known as dimension.
In our day to day life, we see several objects like books, balls, ice-cream cones etc.,
around us which have different shapes. One thing common about most of these objects is that
they all have some length, breadth and height or depth.
That is, they all occupy space and have three dimensions.
Hence, they are called three dimensional shapes.
Do you remember some of the three dimensional shapes (i.e., solid shapes) we have seen
in earlier classes?
Match the shape with the name:
Chapter  15
Visualising Solid
Shapes
TRY THESE
Fig 15.1
(i) (a) Cuboid (iv) (d) Sphere
(ii) (b) Cylinder (v) (e) Pyramid
(iii) (c) Cube (vi) (f) Cone
Page 2


VISUALISING SOLID SHAPES 277 277 277 277 277
15.1  INTRODUCTION: PLANE FIGURES AND SOLID SHAPES
In this chapter, you will classify figures you have seen in terms of what is known as dimension.
In our day to day life, we see several objects like books, balls, ice-cream cones etc.,
around us which have different shapes. One thing common about most of these objects is that
they all have some length, breadth and height or depth.
That is, they all occupy space and have three dimensions.
Hence, they are called three dimensional shapes.
Do you remember some of the three dimensional shapes (i.e., solid shapes) we have seen
in earlier classes?
Match the shape with the name:
Chapter  15
Visualising Solid
Shapes
TRY THESE
Fig 15.1
(i) (a) Cuboid (iv) (d) Sphere
(ii) (b) Cylinder (v) (e) Pyramid
(iii) (c) Cube (vi) (f) Cone
MATHEMATICS 278 278 278 278 278
Try to identify some objects shaped like each of these.
By a similar argument, we can say figures drawn on paper which have only length and
breadth are called two dimensional (i.e., plane) figures. We have also seen some two
dimensional figures in the earlier classes.
Match the 2 dimensional figures with the names (Fig 15.2):
(i) (a) Circle
(ii) (b) Rectangle
(iii) (c) Square
(iv) (d) Quadrilateral
(v) (e) Triangle
Fig 15.2
Note: We can write 2-D in short for 2-dimension and 3-D in short for
3-dimension.
15.2  FACES, EDGES AND VERTICES
Do you remember the Faces, Vertices and Edges of solid shapes, which you studied
earlier?  Here you see them for a cube:
(i) (ii) (iii)
Fig 15.3
The 8 corners of the cube are its vertices. The 12 line segments that form the
skeleton of the cube are its edges. The 6 flat square surfaces that are the skin of the
cube are its faces.
Page 3


VISUALISING SOLID SHAPES 277 277 277 277 277
15.1  INTRODUCTION: PLANE FIGURES AND SOLID SHAPES
In this chapter, you will classify figures you have seen in terms of what is known as dimension.
In our day to day life, we see several objects like books, balls, ice-cream cones etc.,
around us which have different shapes. One thing common about most of these objects is that
they all have some length, breadth and height or depth.
That is, they all occupy space and have three dimensions.
Hence, they are called three dimensional shapes.
Do you remember some of the three dimensional shapes (i.e., solid shapes) we have seen
in earlier classes?
Match the shape with the name:
Chapter  15
Visualising Solid
Shapes
TRY THESE
Fig 15.1
(i) (a) Cuboid (iv) (d) Sphere
(ii) (b) Cylinder (v) (e) Pyramid
(iii) (c) Cube (vi) (f) Cone
MATHEMATICS 278 278 278 278 278
Try to identify some objects shaped like each of these.
By a similar argument, we can say figures drawn on paper which have only length and
breadth are called two dimensional (i.e., plane) figures. We have also seen some two
dimensional figures in the earlier classes.
Match the 2 dimensional figures with the names (Fig 15.2):
(i) (a) Circle
(ii) (b) Rectangle
(iii) (c) Square
(iv) (d) Quadrilateral
(v) (e) Triangle
Fig 15.2
Note: We can write 2-D in short for 2-dimension and 3-D in short for
3-dimension.
15.2  FACES, EDGES AND VERTICES
Do you remember the Faces, Vertices and Edges of solid shapes, which you studied
earlier?  Here you see them for a cube:
(i) (ii) (iii)
Fig 15.3
The 8 corners of the cube are its vertices. The 12 line segments that form the
skeleton of the cube are its edges. The 6 flat square surfaces that are the skin of the
cube are its faces.
VISUALISING SOLID SHAPES 279 279 279 279 279
Complete the following table:
Table 15.1
Can you see that, the two dimensional figures can be identified as the faces of the
three dimensional shapes?  For example a cylinder  has two faces which are circles,
and a pyramid, shaped like this  has triangles as its faces.
We will now try to see how some of these 3-D shapes can be visualised on a 2-D
surface, that is, on paper.
In order to do this, we would like to get familiar with three dimensional objects closely .
Let us try forming these objects by making what are called nets.
15.3  NETS FOR BUILDING 3-D SHAPES
T ake a cardboard box.  Cut the edges to lay the box flat.  Y ou have now a net for that box.
A net is a sort of skeleton-outline in 2-D [Fig154 (i)], which, when folded [Fig154 (ii)],
results in a 3-D shape [Fig154 (iii)].
(i) (ii) (iii)
Fig 15.4
DO THIS
Vertex
Face
Edge
Face
Vertex
Edge
Faces (F) 64
Edges (E) 12
V ertices (V)84
Page 4


VISUALISING SOLID SHAPES 277 277 277 277 277
15.1  INTRODUCTION: PLANE FIGURES AND SOLID SHAPES
In this chapter, you will classify figures you have seen in terms of what is known as dimension.
In our day to day life, we see several objects like books, balls, ice-cream cones etc.,
around us which have different shapes. One thing common about most of these objects is that
they all have some length, breadth and height or depth.
That is, they all occupy space and have three dimensions.
Hence, they are called three dimensional shapes.
Do you remember some of the three dimensional shapes (i.e., solid shapes) we have seen
in earlier classes?
Match the shape with the name:
Chapter  15
Visualising Solid
Shapes
TRY THESE
Fig 15.1
(i) (a) Cuboid (iv) (d) Sphere
(ii) (b) Cylinder (v) (e) Pyramid
(iii) (c) Cube (vi) (f) Cone
MATHEMATICS 278 278 278 278 278
Try to identify some objects shaped like each of these.
By a similar argument, we can say figures drawn on paper which have only length and
breadth are called two dimensional (i.e., plane) figures. We have also seen some two
dimensional figures in the earlier classes.
Match the 2 dimensional figures with the names (Fig 15.2):
(i) (a) Circle
(ii) (b) Rectangle
(iii) (c) Square
(iv) (d) Quadrilateral
(v) (e) Triangle
Fig 15.2
Note: We can write 2-D in short for 2-dimension and 3-D in short for
3-dimension.
15.2  FACES, EDGES AND VERTICES
Do you remember the Faces, Vertices and Edges of solid shapes, which you studied
earlier?  Here you see them for a cube:
(i) (ii) (iii)
Fig 15.3
The 8 corners of the cube are its vertices. The 12 line segments that form the
skeleton of the cube are its edges. The 6 flat square surfaces that are the skin of the
cube are its faces.
VISUALISING SOLID SHAPES 279 279 279 279 279
Complete the following table:
Table 15.1
Can you see that, the two dimensional figures can be identified as the faces of the
three dimensional shapes?  For example a cylinder  has two faces which are circles,
and a pyramid, shaped like this  has triangles as its faces.
We will now try to see how some of these 3-D shapes can be visualised on a 2-D
surface, that is, on paper.
In order to do this, we would like to get familiar with three dimensional objects closely .
Let us try forming these objects by making what are called nets.
15.3  NETS FOR BUILDING 3-D SHAPES
T ake a cardboard box.  Cut the edges to lay the box flat.  Y ou have now a net for that box.
A net is a sort of skeleton-outline in 2-D [Fig154 (i)], which, when folded [Fig154 (ii)],
results in a 3-D shape [Fig154 (iii)].
(i) (ii) (iii)
Fig 15.4
DO THIS
Vertex
Face
Edge
Face
Vertex
Edge
Faces (F) 64
Edges (E) 12
V ertices (V)84
MATHEMATICS 280 280 280 280 280
Here you got a net by suitably separating the edges. Is the
reverse process possible?
Here is a net pattern for a box (Fig 15.5). Copy an enlarged
version of the net and try to make the box by suitably folding
and gluing together. (Y ou may use suitable units). The box is a
solid. It is a 3-D object with the shape of a cuboid.
Similarly, you can get a net for a cone by cutting a slit along
its slant surface (Fig 15.6).
You have different nets for different
shapes.  Copy enlarged versions of the nets
given (Fig 15.7) and try to make the 3-D shapes
indicated. (You may also like to prepare
skeleton models using strips of cardboard
fastened with paper clips).
Fig 15.7
W e could also try to make a net for making a pyramid like the Great Pyramid in Giza
(Egypt) (Fig 15.8). That pyramid has a square base and triangles on the four sides.
See if you can make it with the given net (Fig 15.9).
Fig 15.5
Fig 15.6
Cube
(i)
Cone
(iii)
Cylinder
(ii)
Fig 15.9 Fig 15.8
Page 5


VISUALISING SOLID SHAPES 277 277 277 277 277
15.1  INTRODUCTION: PLANE FIGURES AND SOLID SHAPES
In this chapter, you will classify figures you have seen in terms of what is known as dimension.
In our day to day life, we see several objects like books, balls, ice-cream cones etc.,
around us which have different shapes. One thing common about most of these objects is that
they all have some length, breadth and height or depth.
That is, they all occupy space and have three dimensions.
Hence, they are called three dimensional shapes.
Do you remember some of the three dimensional shapes (i.e., solid shapes) we have seen
in earlier classes?
Match the shape with the name:
Chapter  15
Visualising Solid
Shapes
TRY THESE
Fig 15.1
(i) (a) Cuboid (iv) (d) Sphere
(ii) (b) Cylinder (v) (e) Pyramid
(iii) (c) Cube (vi) (f) Cone
MATHEMATICS 278 278 278 278 278
Try to identify some objects shaped like each of these.
By a similar argument, we can say figures drawn on paper which have only length and
breadth are called two dimensional (i.e., plane) figures. We have also seen some two
dimensional figures in the earlier classes.
Match the 2 dimensional figures with the names (Fig 15.2):
(i) (a) Circle
(ii) (b) Rectangle
(iii) (c) Square
(iv) (d) Quadrilateral
(v) (e) Triangle
Fig 15.2
Note: We can write 2-D in short for 2-dimension and 3-D in short for
3-dimension.
15.2  FACES, EDGES AND VERTICES
Do you remember the Faces, Vertices and Edges of solid shapes, which you studied
earlier?  Here you see them for a cube:
(i) (ii) (iii)
Fig 15.3
The 8 corners of the cube are its vertices. The 12 line segments that form the
skeleton of the cube are its edges. The 6 flat square surfaces that are the skin of the
cube are its faces.
VISUALISING SOLID SHAPES 279 279 279 279 279
Complete the following table:
Table 15.1
Can you see that, the two dimensional figures can be identified as the faces of the
three dimensional shapes?  For example a cylinder  has two faces which are circles,
and a pyramid, shaped like this  has triangles as its faces.
We will now try to see how some of these 3-D shapes can be visualised on a 2-D
surface, that is, on paper.
In order to do this, we would like to get familiar with three dimensional objects closely .
Let us try forming these objects by making what are called nets.
15.3  NETS FOR BUILDING 3-D SHAPES
T ake a cardboard box.  Cut the edges to lay the box flat.  Y ou have now a net for that box.
A net is a sort of skeleton-outline in 2-D [Fig154 (i)], which, when folded [Fig154 (ii)],
results in a 3-D shape [Fig154 (iii)].
(i) (ii) (iii)
Fig 15.4
DO THIS
Vertex
Face
Edge
Face
Vertex
Edge
Faces (F) 64
Edges (E) 12
V ertices (V)84
MATHEMATICS 280 280 280 280 280
Here you got a net by suitably separating the edges. Is the
reverse process possible?
Here is a net pattern for a box (Fig 15.5). Copy an enlarged
version of the net and try to make the box by suitably folding
and gluing together. (Y ou may use suitable units). The box is a
solid. It is a 3-D object with the shape of a cuboid.
Similarly, you can get a net for a cone by cutting a slit along
its slant surface (Fig 15.6).
You have different nets for different
shapes.  Copy enlarged versions of the nets
given (Fig 15.7) and try to make the 3-D shapes
indicated. (You may also like to prepare
skeleton models using strips of cardboard
fastened with paper clips).
Fig 15.7
W e could also try to make a net for making a pyramid like the Great Pyramid in Giza
(Egypt) (Fig 15.8). That pyramid has a square base and triangles on the four sides.
See if you can make it with the given net (Fig 15.9).
Fig 15.5
Fig 15.6
Cube
(i)
Cone
(iii)
Cylinder
(ii)
Fig 15.9 Fig 15.8
VISUALISING SOLID SHAPES 281 281 281 281 281
Here you find four nets (Fig 15.10). There are two correct nets among them to make
a tetrahedron.  See if you can work out which nets will make a tetrahedron.
Fig 15.10
EXERCISE 15.1
1. Identify the nets which can be used to make cubes (cut out copies of the nets and try it):
(i) (ii) (iii)
(iv) (v) (vi)
2. Dice are cubes with dots on each face.  Opposite faces of a die always have a total
of seven dots on them.
Here are two nets to make dice (cubes); the numbers inserted in each square indicate
the number of dots in that box.
Insert suitable numbers in the blanks, remembering that the number on the
opposite faces should total to 7.
3. Can this be a net for a die?
Explain your answer .
TRY THESE
1    2
3     4
5    6
Read More
Offer running on EduRev: Apply code STAYHOME200 to get INR 200 off on our premium plan EduRev Infinity!

Complete Syllabus of Class 7

Dynamic Test

Content Category

Related Searches

NCERT Textbook - Visualising Solid Shapes Class 7 Notes | EduRev

,

Semester Notes

,

MCQs

,

ppt

,

Exam

,

Sample Paper

,

past year papers

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

pdf

,

Important questions

,

Objective type Questions

,

NCERT Textbook - Visualising Solid Shapes Class 7 Notes | EduRev

,

Viva Questions

,

study material

,

video lectures

,

practice quizzes

,

Free

,

mock tests for examination

,

NCERT Textbook - Visualising Solid Shapes Class 7 Notes | EduRev

,

Summary

,

shortcuts and tricks

,

Extra Questions

;