NCERT Textbook - Understanding Media Class 7 Notes | EduRev

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Class 7 : NCERT Textbook - Understanding Media Class 7 Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


68
UNIT
FOUR
©NCERT
not to be republished
Page 2


68
UNIT
FOUR
©NCERT
not to be republished
69
Media and Advertising
Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note
Today, the media and advertising are a
pervasive presence in the lives of young
people, who may or may not have taken
the opportunity to seriously reflect upon
this fact. This Unit offers some ways by
which we can begin to think about these.
The focus in ‘Understanding Media’ is on
explaining the strong links between media
and technology and media and big
business.  It explains how     the media ‘sets
the agenda’ through influencing our
perception of issues worth devoting time
and attention to, and issues that are
neglected or overridden. In ‘Understanding
Advertising’ we have focused both on
critically analysing how advertising
strategies influence customers, as well as
demonstrating what goes into the making
of an advertisement.  The significance of a
‘brand’ and the need to promote the
uniqueness of a product is a key part of
advertising. The chapter identifies the
mechanisms that advertisements use     to
appeal to the consumer, and explains how
these are powerfully linked to the
consumer’s self-image.
Chapters 6 and 7 foreground the
widespread effects of the media and
advertising, and attempt to connect the
issues under discussion to the learner’s
own lives.  At the end of the media chapter,
we expect the learner to recognise the role
of big business in the media coverage of
events — the way ‘news’ is selected for
coverage, and the explicit/implicit
dimensions of that coverage. We use two
fictitious news reports to demonstrate     that
there is seldom just one version of a story
or an event.  Building on this, we expect
the learner to develop the skills required
to critically analyse a newspaper report or
a TV story through scrutinising the
information provided, as well as
understanding the logic behind the
exclusion of certain perspectives.
In the advertising chapter, two fictitious
advertisements have been created to
systematically take the learner through  the
techniques of crafting advertisements that
appeal to the consumer. The examples
focus on the significance of the key terms
‘brand’ and ‘brand values’ that are integral
to advertising. These ideas can be
strengthened by selecting examples from
actual advertisements and structuring
similar questions around them.
Both chapters conclude by linking their
contents to the idea of democracy.  Both
emphasise, through using examples of
local media as well as social advertising,
how mainstream media and advertising
tend to favour those who have greater
financial as well as social resources. This
point can be reinforced in the classroom
by using local examples of media stories,
as well as posing questions about the ways
in which advertising is changing what is
locally available as well as locally valued.
69
©NCERT
not to be republished
Page 3


68
UNIT
FOUR
©NCERT
not to be republished
69
Media and Advertising
Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note
Today, the media and advertising are a
pervasive presence in the lives of young
people, who may or may not have taken
the opportunity to seriously reflect upon
this fact. This Unit offers some ways by
which we can begin to think about these.
The focus in ‘Understanding Media’ is on
explaining the strong links between media
and technology and media and big
business.  It explains how     the media ‘sets
the agenda’ through influencing our
perception of issues worth devoting time
and attention to, and issues that are
neglected or overridden. In ‘Understanding
Advertising’ we have focused both on
critically analysing how advertising
strategies influence customers, as well as
demonstrating what goes into the making
of an advertisement.  The significance of a
‘brand’ and the need to promote the
uniqueness of a product is a key part of
advertising. The chapter identifies the
mechanisms that advertisements use     to
appeal to the consumer, and explains how
these are powerfully linked to the
consumer’s self-image.
Chapters 6 and 7 foreground the
widespread effects of the media and
advertising, and attempt to connect the
issues under discussion to the learner’s
own lives.  At the end of the media chapter,
we expect the learner to recognise the role
of big business in the media coverage of
events — the way ‘news’ is selected for
coverage, and the explicit/implicit
dimensions of that coverage. We use two
fictitious news reports to demonstrate     that
there is seldom just one version of a story
or an event.  Building on this, we expect
the learner to develop the skills required
to critically analyse a newspaper report or
a TV story through scrutinising the
information provided, as well as
understanding the logic behind the
exclusion of certain perspectives.
In the advertising chapter, two fictitious
advertisements have been created to
systematically take the learner through  the
techniques of crafting advertisements that
appeal to the consumer. The examples
focus on the significance of the key terms
‘brand’ and ‘brand values’ that are integral
to advertising. These ideas can be
strengthened by selecting examples from
actual advertisements and structuring
similar questions around them.
Both chapters conclude by linking their
contents to the idea of democracy.  Both
emphasise, through using examples of
local media as well as social advertising,
how mainstream media and advertising
tend to favour those who have greater
financial as well as social resources. This
point can be reinforced in the classroom
by using local examples of media stories,
as well as posing questions about the ways
in which advertising is changing what is
locally available as well as locally valued.
69
©NCERT
not to be republished
Understanding Media
What is your favourite TV programme? What do you like listening to on
the radio?  Which newspaper or magazine do you usually read? Do you
surf the internet and what have you found most useful about it? Did you
know that there is one word that is often used to collectively refer to
the radio, TV, newspapers, Internet and several other forms of
communication. This word is ‘media’. In this chapter, you will read
more about the media. You will find out what is required to make it
work, as well as the ways in which the media affects our daily lives. Can
you think of one thing that you have learnt from the media this week?
6
CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER
©NCERT
not to be republished
Page 4


68
UNIT
FOUR
©NCERT
not to be republished
69
Media and Advertising
Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note
Today, the media and advertising are a
pervasive presence in the lives of young
people, who may or may not have taken
the opportunity to seriously reflect upon
this fact. This Unit offers some ways by
which we can begin to think about these.
The focus in ‘Understanding Media’ is on
explaining the strong links between media
and technology and media and big
business.  It explains how     the media ‘sets
the agenda’ through influencing our
perception of issues worth devoting time
and attention to, and issues that are
neglected or overridden. In ‘Understanding
Advertising’ we have focused both on
critically analysing how advertising
strategies influence customers, as well as
demonstrating what goes into the making
of an advertisement.  The significance of a
‘brand’ and the need to promote the
uniqueness of a product is a key part of
advertising. The chapter identifies the
mechanisms that advertisements use     to
appeal to the consumer, and explains how
these are powerfully linked to the
consumer’s self-image.
Chapters 6 and 7 foreground the
widespread effects of the media and
advertising, and attempt to connect the
issues under discussion to the learner’s
own lives.  At the end of the media chapter,
we expect the learner to recognise the role
of big business in the media coverage of
events — the way ‘news’ is selected for
coverage, and the explicit/implicit
dimensions of that coverage. We use two
fictitious news reports to demonstrate     that
there is seldom just one version of a story
or an event.  Building on this, we expect
the learner to develop the skills required
to critically analyse a newspaper report or
a TV story through scrutinising the
information provided, as well as
understanding the logic behind the
exclusion of certain perspectives.
In the advertising chapter, two fictitious
advertisements have been created to
systematically take the learner through  the
techniques of crafting advertisements that
appeal to the consumer. The examples
focus on the significance of the key terms
‘brand’ and ‘brand values’ that are integral
to advertising. These ideas can be
strengthened by selecting examples from
actual advertisements and structuring
similar questions around them.
Both chapters conclude by linking their
contents to the idea of democracy.  Both
emphasise, through using examples of
local media as well as social advertising,
how mainstream media and advertising
tend to favour those who have greater
financial as well as social resources. This
point can be reinforced in the classroom
by using local examples of media stories,
as well as posing questions about the ways
in which advertising is changing what is
locally available as well as locally valued.
69
©NCERT
not to be republished
Understanding Media
What is your favourite TV programme? What do you like listening to on
the radio?  Which newspaper or magazine do you usually read? Do you
surf the internet and what have you found most useful about it? Did you
know that there is one word that is often used to collectively refer to
the radio, TV, newspapers, Internet and several other forms of
communication. This word is ‘media’. In this chapter, you will read
more about the media. You will find out what is required to make it
work, as well as the ways in which the media affects our daily lives. Can
you think of one thing that you have learnt from the media this week?
6
CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER
©NCERT
not to be republished
Look at the collage on the left and
list six various kinds of media that
you see.
An artist’s impression of Gutenberg
printing the first sheet of the Bible.
Ask older members of your family
about what they used to listen to
on the radio when there was no
TV around. Find out from them
when the first TV came to your
area. When was cable TV
introduced?
How many people in your
neighbourhood use the Internet?
List three things that you know
about some other part of the
world from watching television?
Everything ranging from the stall at the local fair to
the programme that you see on TV can be called
media. Media is the plural form of the word ‘medium’
and it describes the various ways through which we
communicate in society. Because media refers to all
means of communication, everything ranging from
a phone call to the evening news on TV can be called
media. TV, radio and newspapers are a form of media
that reaches millions of people, or the masses, across
the country and the world and, thus, they are called
mass media.
Media and technology Media and technology Media and technology Media and technology Media and technology
It would probably be difficult for you to imagine your
life without the media. But cable television and the
widespread use of the Internet is a recent
phenomenon. These have been around for less than
twenty years. The technology that mass media uses
keeps changing.
Newspapers, television and radio can reach
millions of people because they use certain
technologies. We also tend to discuss newspapers
and magazines as the print media; and TV and radio
as the electronic media. Why do you think
newspapers are called print media? As you read
further, you will find that this naming is related to
the different technologies that these media use. The
following photographs will give you a sense of the
ways in which technology that mass media uses has
changed over the years and continues to change.
Changing technology, or machines, and making
technology more modern, helps media to reach more
people. It also improves the quality of sound and the
images that you see. But technology does more than
this. It also changes the ways in which we think about
our lives. For example, today it is quite difficult for
us to think of our lives without television. Television
has enabled us to think of ourselves as members of
a larger global world. Television images travel huge
71 Chapter 6: Understanding Media Understanding Media Understanding Media Understanding Media Understanding Media
©NCERT
not to be republished
Page 5


68
UNIT
FOUR
©NCERT
not to be republished
69
Media and Advertising
Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note
Today, the media and advertising are a
pervasive presence in the lives of young
people, who may or may not have taken
the opportunity to seriously reflect upon
this fact. This Unit offers some ways by
which we can begin to think about these.
The focus in ‘Understanding Media’ is on
explaining the strong links between media
and technology and media and big
business.  It explains how     the media ‘sets
the agenda’ through influencing our
perception of issues worth devoting time
and attention to, and issues that are
neglected or overridden. In ‘Understanding
Advertising’ we have focused both on
critically analysing how advertising
strategies influence customers, as well as
demonstrating what goes into the making
of an advertisement.  The significance of a
‘brand’ and the need to promote the
uniqueness of a product is a key part of
advertising. The chapter identifies the
mechanisms that advertisements use     to
appeal to the consumer, and explains how
these are powerfully linked to the
consumer’s self-image.
Chapters 6 and 7 foreground the
widespread effects of the media and
advertising, and attempt to connect the
issues under discussion to the learner’s
own lives.  At the end of the media chapter,
we expect the learner to recognise the role
of big business in the media coverage of
events — the way ‘news’ is selected for
coverage, and the explicit/implicit
dimensions of that coverage. We use two
fictitious news reports to demonstrate     that
there is seldom just one version of a story
or an event.  Building on this, we expect
the learner to develop the skills required
to critically analyse a newspaper report or
a TV story through scrutinising the
information provided, as well as
understanding the logic behind the
exclusion of certain perspectives.
In the advertising chapter, two fictitious
advertisements have been created to
systematically take the learner through  the
techniques of crafting advertisements that
appeal to the consumer. The examples
focus on the significance of the key terms
‘brand’ and ‘brand values’ that are integral
to advertising. These ideas can be
strengthened by selecting examples from
actual advertisements and structuring
similar questions around them.
Both chapters conclude by linking their
contents to the idea of democracy.  Both
emphasise, through using examples of
local media as well as social advertising,
how mainstream media and advertising
tend to favour those who have greater
financial as well as social resources. This
point can be reinforced in the classroom
by using local examples of media stories,
as well as posing questions about the ways
in which advertising is changing what is
locally available as well as locally valued.
69
©NCERT
not to be republished
Understanding Media
What is your favourite TV programme? What do you like listening to on
the radio?  Which newspaper or magazine do you usually read? Do you
surf the internet and what have you found most useful about it? Did you
know that there is one word that is often used to collectively refer to
the radio, TV, newspapers, Internet and several other forms of
communication. This word is ‘media’. In this chapter, you will read
more about the media. You will find out what is required to make it
work, as well as the ways in which the media affects our daily lives. Can
you think of one thing that you have learnt from the media this week?
6
CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER
©NCERT
not to be republished
Look at the collage on the left and
list six various kinds of media that
you see.
An artist’s impression of Gutenberg
printing the first sheet of the Bible.
Ask older members of your family
about what they used to listen to
on the radio when there was no
TV around. Find out from them
when the first TV came to your
area. When was cable TV
introduced?
How many people in your
neighbourhood use the Internet?
List three things that you know
about some other part of the
world from watching television?
Everything ranging from the stall at the local fair to
the programme that you see on TV can be called
media. Media is the plural form of the word ‘medium’
and it describes the various ways through which we
communicate in society. Because media refers to all
means of communication, everything ranging from
a phone call to the evening news on TV can be called
media. TV, radio and newspapers are a form of media
that reaches millions of people, or the masses, across
the country and the world and, thus, they are called
mass media.
Media and technology Media and technology Media and technology Media and technology Media and technology
It would probably be difficult for you to imagine your
life without the media. But cable television and the
widespread use of the Internet is a recent
phenomenon. These have been around for less than
twenty years. The technology that mass media uses
keeps changing.
Newspapers, television and radio can reach
millions of people because they use certain
technologies. We also tend to discuss newspapers
and magazines as the print media; and TV and radio
as the electronic media. Why do you think
newspapers are called print media? As you read
further, you will find that this naming is related to
the different technologies that these media use. The
following photographs will give you a sense of the
ways in which technology that mass media uses has
changed over the years and continues to change.
Changing technology, or machines, and making
technology more modern, helps media to reach more
people. It also improves the quality of sound and the
images that you see. But technology does more than
this. It also changes the ways in which we think about
our lives. For example, today it is quite difficult for
us to think of our lives without television. Television
has enabled us to think of ourselves as members of
a larger global world. Television images travel huge
71 Chapter 6: Understanding Media Understanding Media Understanding Media Understanding Media Understanding Media
©NCERT
not to be republished
72 Social and Political Life Social and Political Life Social and Political Life Social and Political Life Social and Political Life
Can you list three different
products that are advertised
during your favourite TV
programme?
Take a newspaper and count the
number of advertisements in it.
Some people say that newspapers
have too many advertisements. Do
you think this is true and why?
John L. Baird sits in front of the
apparatus with which he demonstrated to
the Royal Institute, his invention, the
‘televisor’, an early television.
With electronic typerwriters, journalism
underwent a sea-change in the 1940s.
distances through satellites and cables. This allows
us to view news and entertainment channels from
other parts of the world. Most of the cartoons that
you see on television are mostly from Japan or the
United States. We can now be sitting in Chennai or
Jammu and can see images of a storm that has hit
the coast of Florida in the United States. Television
has brought the world closer to us.
Media and money Media and money Media and money Media and money Media and money
The different technologies that mass media use are
expensive. Just think about the TV studio in which
the newsreader sits – it has lights, cameras, sound
recorders, transmission satellites, etc., all of which
cost a lot of money.
In a news studio, it is not only the newsreader
who needs to be paid but also a number of other
people who help put the broadcast together. This
includes those who look after the cameras and lights.
Also, as you read earlier the technologies that mass
media use keep changing and so a lot of money is
spent on getting the latest technology. Due to these
costs, the mass media needs a great deal of money
to do its work. As a result, most television channels
and newspapers are part of big business houses.
Mass media is constantly thinking of ways to make
money. One way in which the mass media earns
money is by advertising different things like cars,
chocolates, clothes, mobile phones, etc. You must
have noticed the number of advertisements that you
have to see while watching your favourite television
show. While watching a cricket match on TV, the
same advertisements are shown repeatedly between
each over and so you are often watching the same
image over and over again. As you will read in the
following chapter, advertisements are repeated in the
hope that you will go out and buy what is advertised.
©NCERT
not to be republished
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