NCERT Textbook - On Equality Class 7 Notes | EduRev

Polity and Constitution (Prelims) by IAS Masters

Created by: Rohini Seth

Class 7 : NCERT Textbook - On Equality Class 7 Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


2
UNIT
ONE
©NCERT
not to be republished
Page 2


2
UNIT
ONE
©NCERT
not to be republished
3
Equality in Indian Democracy
Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note
This Unit introduces the learner to the
critical role of equality in democracy, with
specific reference to India. The Constitution
of India guarantees equality to all citizens.
Despite this, the daily lives of people in
India are far from equal.     Earlier
discussions on equality in Civics textbooks
most often reiterated certain provisions of
the Constitution without adequately
considering the reality of these in people’s
lives. This Unit adopts a different approach.
It discusses the need for equality through
highlighting the inequalities that continue
to be practised and experienced by various
communities.
The first chapter introduces the learner
to Kanta, Omprakash Valmiki and the
Ansaris, all of whom experience inequality
in different ways. It is through their
experiences that we introduce the concept
of dignity. The government’s role in passing
laws and instituting policies is discussed
to show that commitment to the alleviation
of existing inequalities is a major part of
the work that governments undertake. The
chapter also briefly introduces an issue of
inequality in the United States of America
to highlight that this is a global phenomenon
and a feature of many democratic countries.
The second chapter of this Unit is
Chapter 10 of this book. It     ties together
the main ideas on equality raised
throughout the text. A significant portion
of the last chapter is devoted to discussing
people’s contribution to the fight for
equality. This is achieved through focusing
on one social movement as well as
highlighting creative (writings, songs,
poems) ways through which people express
their demands for equality.
Both chapters aim to help the learner
understand that equality and democracy
are dynamic and not static concepts. This
dynamism is reflected in the government’s
passing of new laws and programmes, and
in people’s movements around various
social and economic issues.
Kanta, Omprakash, the Ansaris, and the
Tawa Matsya Sangh all have diverse local
equivalents. Local situations should be
used as a practical reference to make the
discussion on underlying concepts more
relevant and appropriate. A discussion on
equality in the classroom requires empathy
as well as a firm commitment on the
teacher’s     part to ensuring that the dignity
of all learners be respected.
3
©NCERT
not to be republished
Page 3


2
UNIT
ONE
©NCERT
not to be republished
3
Equality in Indian Democracy
Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note
This Unit introduces the learner to the
critical role of equality in democracy, with
specific reference to India. The Constitution
of India guarantees equality to all citizens.
Despite this, the daily lives of people in
India are far from equal.     Earlier
discussions on equality in Civics textbooks
most often reiterated certain provisions of
the Constitution without adequately
considering the reality of these in people’s
lives. This Unit adopts a different approach.
It discusses the need for equality through
highlighting the inequalities that continue
to be practised and experienced by various
communities.
The first chapter introduces the learner
to Kanta, Omprakash Valmiki and the
Ansaris, all of whom experience inequality
in different ways. It is through their
experiences that we introduce the concept
of dignity. The government’s role in passing
laws and instituting policies is discussed
to show that commitment to the alleviation
of existing inequalities is a major part of
the work that governments undertake. The
chapter also briefly introduces an issue of
inequality in the United States of America
to highlight that this is a global phenomenon
and a feature of many democratic countries.
The second chapter of this Unit is
Chapter 10 of this book. It     ties together
the main ideas on equality raised
throughout the text. A significant portion
of the last chapter is devoted to discussing
people’s contribution to the fight for
equality. This is achieved through focusing
on one social movement as well as
highlighting creative (writings, songs,
poems) ways through which people express
their demands for equality.
Both chapters aim to help the learner
understand that equality and democracy
are dynamic and not static concepts. This
dynamism is reflected in the government’s
passing of new laws and programmes, and
in people’s movements around various
social and economic issues.
Kanta, Omprakash, the Ansaris, and the
Tawa Matsya Sangh all have diverse local
equivalents. Local situations should be
used as a practical reference to make the
discussion on underlying concepts more
relevant and appropriate. A discussion on
equality in the classroom requires empathy
as well as a firm commitment on the
teacher’s     part to ensuring that the dignity
of all learners be respected.
3
©NCERT
not to be republished
On Equality
India is a democracy. In the
Class VI book, we looked at
the key elements of a
democratic government.
These include people’s
participation, the
resolution of conflict, and
equality and justice.
Equality is a key feature of
democracy and influences
all aspects of its
functioning. In this chapter
you will read more about
equality – what it is, why it
is important in a
democracy, and whether or
not everyone is equal in
India. Let’s begin by
looking at Kanta’s story.
Isn’t it good Suja that we can all vote as
equal citizens of our country? Even Jain
Saheb is standing in the line with us!
Yes!
Go on, Kanta – It’s
your turn now.
I will vote for the
candidate who has
promised to bring
pipe water to
our area.
Manjit Kaur
T eacher
T eja  Singh
 T rader
Girish Rao
Student
Kanta Devi
Domestic worker
Sujata Kumari
Domestic worker
On election day, Kanta and her friend
Sujata are waiting to cast their votes...
1
CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER
©NCERT
not to be republished
Page 4


2
UNIT
ONE
©NCERT
not to be republished
3
Equality in Indian Democracy
Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note
This Unit introduces the learner to the
critical role of equality in democracy, with
specific reference to India. The Constitution
of India guarantees equality to all citizens.
Despite this, the daily lives of people in
India are far from equal.     Earlier
discussions on equality in Civics textbooks
most often reiterated certain provisions of
the Constitution without adequately
considering the reality of these in people’s
lives. This Unit adopts a different approach.
It discusses the need for equality through
highlighting the inequalities that continue
to be practised and experienced by various
communities.
The first chapter introduces the learner
to Kanta, Omprakash Valmiki and the
Ansaris, all of whom experience inequality
in different ways. It is through their
experiences that we introduce the concept
of dignity. The government’s role in passing
laws and instituting policies is discussed
to show that commitment to the alleviation
of existing inequalities is a major part of
the work that governments undertake. The
chapter also briefly introduces an issue of
inequality in the United States of America
to highlight that this is a global phenomenon
and a feature of many democratic countries.
The second chapter of this Unit is
Chapter 10 of this book. It     ties together
the main ideas on equality raised
throughout the text. A significant portion
of the last chapter is devoted to discussing
people’s contribution to the fight for
equality. This is achieved through focusing
on one social movement as well as
highlighting creative (writings, songs,
poems) ways through which people express
their demands for equality.
Both chapters aim to help the learner
understand that equality and democracy
are dynamic and not static concepts. This
dynamism is reflected in the government’s
passing of new laws and programmes, and
in people’s movements around various
social and economic issues.
Kanta, Omprakash, the Ansaris, and the
Tawa Matsya Sangh all have diverse local
equivalents. Local situations should be
used as a practical reference to make the
discussion on underlying concepts more
relevant and appropriate. A discussion on
equality in the classroom requires empathy
as well as a firm commitment on the
teacher’s     part to ensuring that the dignity
of all learners be respected.
3
©NCERT
not to be republished
On Equality
India is a democracy. In the
Class VI book, we looked at
the key elements of a
democratic government.
These include people’s
participation, the
resolution of conflict, and
equality and justice.
Equality is a key feature of
democracy and influences
all aspects of its
functioning. In this chapter
you will read more about
equality – what it is, why it
is important in a
democracy, and whether or
not everyone is equal in
India. Let’s begin by
looking at Kanta’s story.
Isn’t it good Suja that we can all vote as
equal citizens of our country? Even Jain
Saheb is standing in the line with us!
Yes!
Go on, Kanta – It’s
your turn now.
I will vote for the
candidate who has
promised to bring
pipe water to
our area.
Manjit Kaur
T eacher
T eja  Singh
 T rader
Girish Rao
Student
Kanta Devi
Domestic worker
Sujata Kumari
Domestic worker
On election day, Kanta and her friend
Sujata are waiting to cast their votes...
1
CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER
©NCERT
not to be republished
Afterwards...
We’ll see you
later, Kanta.
Y es...
Namaste
Saheb!
Gudia has been running fever
and I have to take her to the
hospital...but I will have to finish
the work at Saheb’s house
first...and ask for some
advance...
At home...
Here have some of this –
you’ll feel better. And
when I get back in the
evening, we’ll go to the
hospital, okay?
It’s no wonder that Gudia
falls ill often...the basti is
never cleaned!
Abdul Rehman
Artisan
Shabnam Bano
Housewife
Gracy Laleng
Consultant
Isaac Laleng
 Government officer
Ruksana Mirza
Media person
Y og Raj
Unemployed
Ashok Jain
Industrialist
©NCERT
not to be republished
Page 5


2
UNIT
ONE
©NCERT
not to be republished
3
Equality in Indian Democracy
Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note Teacher’s note
This Unit introduces the learner to the
critical role of equality in democracy, with
specific reference to India. The Constitution
of India guarantees equality to all citizens.
Despite this, the daily lives of people in
India are far from equal.     Earlier
discussions on equality in Civics textbooks
most often reiterated certain provisions of
the Constitution without adequately
considering the reality of these in people’s
lives. This Unit adopts a different approach.
It discusses the need for equality through
highlighting the inequalities that continue
to be practised and experienced by various
communities.
The first chapter introduces the learner
to Kanta, Omprakash Valmiki and the
Ansaris, all of whom experience inequality
in different ways. It is through their
experiences that we introduce the concept
of dignity. The government’s role in passing
laws and instituting policies is discussed
to show that commitment to the alleviation
of existing inequalities is a major part of
the work that governments undertake. The
chapter also briefly introduces an issue of
inequality in the United States of America
to highlight that this is a global phenomenon
and a feature of many democratic countries.
The second chapter of this Unit is
Chapter 10 of this book. It     ties together
the main ideas on equality raised
throughout the text. A significant portion
of the last chapter is devoted to discussing
people’s contribution to the fight for
equality. This is achieved through focusing
on one social movement as well as
highlighting creative (writings, songs,
poems) ways through which people express
their demands for equality.
Both chapters aim to help the learner
understand that equality and democracy
are dynamic and not static concepts. This
dynamism is reflected in the government’s
passing of new laws and programmes, and
in people’s movements around various
social and economic issues.
Kanta, Omprakash, the Ansaris, and the
Tawa Matsya Sangh all have diverse local
equivalents. Local situations should be
used as a practical reference to make the
discussion on underlying concepts more
relevant and appropriate. A discussion on
equality in the classroom requires empathy
as well as a firm commitment on the
teacher’s     part to ensuring that the dignity
of all learners be respected.
3
©NCERT
not to be republished
On Equality
India is a democracy. In the
Class VI book, we looked at
the key elements of a
democratic government.
These include people’s
participation, the
resolution of conflict, and
equality and justice.
Equality is a key feature of
democracy and influences
all aspects of its
functioning. In this chapter
you will read more about
equality – what it is, why it
is important in a
democracy, and whether or
not everyone is equal in
India. Let’s begin by
looking at Kanta’s story.
Isn’t it good Suja that we can all vote as
equal citizens of our country? Even Jain
Saheb is standing in the line with us!
Yes!
Go on, Kanta – It’s
your turn now.
I will vote for the
candidate who has
promised to bring
pipe water to
our area.
Manjit Kaur
T eacher
T eja  Singh
 T rader
Girish Rao
Student
Kanta Devi
Domestic worker
Sujata Kumari
Domestic worker
On election day, Kanta and her friend
Sujata are waiting to cast their votes...
1
CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER
©NCERT
not to be republished
Afterwards...
We’ll see you
later, Kanta.
Y es...
Namaste
Saheb!
Gudia has been running fever
and I have to take her to the
hospital...but I will have to finish
the work at Saheb’s house
first...and ask for some
advance...
At home...
Here have some of this –
you’ll feel better. And
when I get back in the
evening, we’ll go to the
hospital, okay?
It’s no wonder that Gudia
falls ill often...the basti is
never cleaned!
Abdul Rehman
Artisan
Shabnam Bano
Housewife
Gracy Laleng
Consultant
Isaac Laleng
 Government officer
Ruksana Mirza
Media person
Y og Raj
Unemployed
Ashok Jain
Industrialist
©NCERT
not to be republished
Equal right to vote Equal right to vote Equal right to vote Equal right to vote Equal right to vote
The story above begins with Kanta standing in line
to cast her vote. Look again at the various people
who are standing in line with her. Kanta recognises
her employer, Ashok Jain and Chotte Lal, her
neighbour. In a democratic country, like India, all
adults irrespective of what religion they belong to,
how much education they have had, what caste they
are, or whether they are rich or poor are allowed to
vote. This, as you have already read in the Class VI
book, is called universal adult franchise universal adult franchise universal adult franchise universal adult franchise universal adult franchise and is an
essential aspect of all democracies. The idea of
universal adult franchise is based on the idea of
equality because it states that every adult in a
country, irrespective of their wealth and the
communities she/he belongs to, has one vote. Kanta
is excited to vote and happy that she is equal to all
of the others because each of them has one vote.
But as her day goes on, Kanta becomes less certain
about what this equality really means.
What is it that makes Kanta unsure? Let’s take a
look at a day in her life. She lives in a slum and has
a drain behind her house. Her daughter is sick but
she cannot take the day off from work because she
needs to borrow money from her employers to take
her child to the doctor. Her job as a domestic help
tires her out, and finally she ends her day by again
standing in a long line. This line, in front of the
government hospital, is unlike the one in the morning
because most of the people standing in it are poor.
Do you think Kanta has
enough reason to doubt
whether she really is equal?
List three reasons from the
story above that might
make her feel like this.
Make sure to do the
corners properly.
Here’s your advance,
Kanta – but don’t make a
habit of it!
No Madam...
That evening...
Just few
more
minutes,
Beti.
Jain Madam
and Jain Saheb
may stand in line to
vote, but they
never have to do it
when their children
are sick...
©NCERT
not to be republished
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