Mathematics Exam  >  Mathematics Notes  >  Additional Topics for IIT JAM Mathematics  >  Introduction to Statistics

Introduction to Statistics | Additional Topics for IIT JAM Mathematics PDF Download

Introduction:-
Statistics is a branch of mathematics that deals with the collection, analysis and interpretation of data.
Data can be defined as groups of information that represent the qualitative or quantitative attributes of a variable or set of variables. In layman's terms, data in statistics can be any set of information that describes a given entity. An example of data can be the ages of the students in a given class. When you collect those ages, that becomes your data.
A set in statistics is referred to as a population. Though this term is commonly used to refer to the number of people in a given place, in statistics, a population refers to any entire set from which you collect data.

Data Collection Methods:-
As we have seen in the definition of statistics, data collection is a fundamental aspect and as a consequence, there are different methods of collecting data which when used on one particular set will result in different kinds of data. Let's move on to look at these individual methods of collection in order to better understand the types of data that will result.

Census Data Collection:-
Census data collection is a method of collecting data whereby all the data from each and every member of the population is collected.
For example, when you collect the ages of all the students in a given class, you are using the census data collection method since you are including all the members of the population (which is the class in this case).
This method of data collection is very expensive (tedious, time consuming and costly) if the number of elements (population size) is very large. To understand the scope of how expensive it is, think of trying to count all the ten year old boys in the country. That would take a lot of time and resources, which you may not have.

Sample Data Collection:-
Sample data collection, which is commonly just referred to as sampling, is a method which collects data from only a chosen portion of the population.
Sampling assumes that the portion that is chosen to be sampled is a good estimate of the entire population. Thus one can save resources and time by only collecting data from a small part of the population. But this raises the question of whether sampling is accurate or not. The answer is that for the most part, sampling is approximately accurate. This is only true if you choose your sample carefully to be able to closely approximate what the true population consists of.
Sampling is used commonly in everyday life, for example, all the different research polls that are conducted before elections. Pollsters don't ask all the people in a given state who they'll vote for, but they choose a small sample and assume that these people represent how the entire population of the state is likely to vote. History has shown that these polls are almost always close to accuracy, and as such sampling is a very powerful tool in statistics.

Experimental Data Collection:-
Experimental data collection involves one performing an experiment and then collecting the data to be further analyzed. Experiments involve tests and the results of these tests are your data.
An example of experimental data collection is rolling a die one hundred times while recording the outcomes. Your data would be the results you get in each roll. The experiment could involve rolling the die in different ways and recording the results for each of those different ways.
Experimental data collection is useful in testing theories and different products and is a very fundamental aspect of mathematics and all science as a whole.

Observational Data Collection:-
Observational data collection method involves not carrying out an experiment but observing without influencing the population at all. Observational data collection is popular in studying trends and behaviors of society where, for example, the lives of a bunch of people are observed and data is collected for the different aspects of their lives.

The document Introduction to Statistics | Additional Topics for IIT JAM Mathematics is a part of the Mathematics Course Additional Topics for IIT JAM Mathematics.
All you need of Mathematics at this link: Mathematics
40 docs

Up next

FAQs on Introduction to Statistics - Additional Topics for IIT JAM Mathematics

1. What is statistics and why is it important?
Statistics is a branch of mathematics that involves collecting, analyzing, interpreting, presenting, and organizing data. It allows us to make sense of large amounts of information and make informed decisions based on evidence. Statistics is important because it helps us understand trends, patterns, and relationships in data, which can be used to make predictions, solve problems, and guide decision-making in various fields such as business, healthcare, economics, and social sciences.
2. What are the main types of statistics?
There are two main types of statistics: descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. Descriptive statistics involves summarizing and presenting data in a meaningful way, such as through measures of central tendency (mean, median, mode) and measures of dispersion (range, variance, standard deviation). Inferential statistics, on the other hand, uses sample data to make generalizations or predictions about a larger population.
3. How do I calculate the standard deviation?
To calculate the standard deviation, follow these steps: 1. Calculate the mean of the data set. 2. Subtract the mean from each data value, and square the result. 3. Find the sum of all the squared values. 4. Divide the sum by the total number of data points. 5. Take the square root of the result obtained in step 4. The standard deviation measures the dispersion or spread of data around the mean, giving an indication of how much the individual data points deviate from the average.
4. What is the difference between correlation and causation?
Correlation and causation are two concepts often encountered in statistics and research. Correlation refers to a statistical relationship between two variables, where changes in one variable are associated with changes in another variable. However, correlation does not imply causation. Just because two variables are correlated does not mean that one variable causes the other. There may be other underlying factors or variables that are responsible for the observed relationship. Causation, on the other hand, implies a cause-and-effect relationship between variables. Establishing causation requires additional evidence, such as experimental studies or controlled experiments, to determine that changes in one variable directly cause changes in another variable.
5. How can I interpret p-values in hypothesis testing?
In hypothesis testing, the p-value is a measure of the strength of evidence against the null hypothesis. It represents the probability of obtaining the observed data (or more extreme) if the null hypothesis is true. A p-value less than a predetermined significance level (usually 0.05) suggests that the observed data is unlikely to have occurred by chance alone, and we reject the null hypothesis in favor of the alternative hypothesis. On the other hand, a p-value greater than the significance level indicates that the observed data is likely to have occurred by chance, and we fail to reject the null hypothesis. It is important to note that a p-value does not provide information about the size, importance, or practical significance of the observed effect. The interpretation of p-values should be done in conjunction with other factors, such as effect size and context.
40 docs
Download as PDF

Up next

Explore Courses for Mathematics exam
Signup for Free!
Signup to see your scores go up within 7 days! Learn & Practice with 1000+ FREE Notes, Videos & Tests.
10M+ students study on EduRev
Related Searches

mock tests for examination

,

study material

,

Exam

,

Sample Paper

,

video lectures

,

ppt

,

Important questions

,

Viva Questions

,

Introduction to Statistics | Additional Topics for IIT JAM Mathematics

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

Introduction to Statistics | Additional Topics for IIT JAM Mathematics

,

Introduction to Statistics | Additional Topics for IIT JAM Mathematics

,

MCQs

,

Summary

,

Objective type Questions

,

practice quizzes

,

Semester Notes

,

Extra Questions

,

Free

,

pdf

,

shortcuts and tricks

,

past year papers

;