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Introduction

An assumption is something that we take for granted, or we assume. In various government exams, candidates will be given some statements followed by some assumptions. By reading the given statements, candidates need to take the right decision. Here taking the right decision means selecting the correct assumption.
Several types of problems based on Statement and Assumption reasoning sections are asked in various government competitive exams. Let us see them now one by one. 

Types of Statement and Assumption

As now we know what consists of the questions related to the Statement and Assumption reasoning section.
Let us see the various types of questions that may come one by one below:

  • Existence/Non – existence of the subject: In this type of statement and assumption reasoning, the assumptions are normally simple in nature. Here the assumptions are usually existing or non existing types.
  • Cause Effect: In this type of statement and assumption reasoning, some statements will be given, which will mention a cause and effect relationship. In this type of reasoning, words like “therefore”, “thus”, “hence”, etc. are used frequently. And it would be an assumption to say that “this cause leads to this effect.”
  • Course of action: In this type of statement and assumption reasoning, a fact, report, observation, or study will be given followed by a suggested course of action. 
  • Advertisement/Notice/Appeals: In this type of statement and assumption reasoning, the statements given are usually in a form of an advertisement or an official notice or a notice issued in public interest or an appeal.

How to Solve Question Based on Statement and Assumption Reasoning- Know all Tips and Tricks

 Candidates can find various tips and tricks below for solving the questions related to the Statement and Assumption reasoning section. 

  • Tip # 1: An Assumption is the missing link of the logical structure of an argument. It is left unsaid and therefore, assumed. 
  • Tip # 2: There are some standard categories of statements that have standard ways of assuming certain things. 
  • Tip # 3: In judging the validity of a given assumption, a special note should be taken of some keywords. 
  • Tip # 4: The answer choice “either of them is implicit” is very rarely correct for assumption questions. 
  • Tip # 5: The assumption should be considered from Author’s point of view and not yours. 
  • Tip # 6: There are some words that lend a greater degree of emphasis to understand the sentence. The word “definitely”, “certainly”, “only”, “best”, “strongest”, “all”, etc. Impart a kind of exclusiveness to the sentence and thereby reduce the scope of the sentence.

Solved Examples

Example 1: Statement: It is good to put the child in school at the age of 3.
Assumptions: 1. A child at the age of 3 is not ready to learn.
2. Doing so will make a child good in studies.

The statement tells us that putting a child in school at the age of 3 is good, but no information is given if the child is ready to learn or doing so will make a child good in studies.
Therefore, ‘neither I nor II is true’.


Example 2: Statement: The manufacturing companies in Tamil Nadu are facing acute power shortage.
Course of Action: 1. Government should take steps to solve the power crisis.
2. Government should shut down manufacturing companies to save power.

It is the job of the government to solve the industrial power crisis when manufacturing companies are facing the electricity crunch. Shutting down the companies to save the power is not the solution as it will stop the industrial growth of the state. Hence only the 1st course of action is correct.


Example 3: Statement: It rained last night. The ground must have become wet.
Assumption: When it rains the ground becomes wet.

As we know, things get wet when they come in contact with water. So when it rains, the ground gets wet due to water. So this is a valid assumption.


Example 4: Statement: The government should focus on solving the immediate problems of today rather than trying to solve the anticipated problems of the future.
Assumption: Current problems should be given more priority over the problems of the future.

The words ‘solving the immediate problems of today rather than on trying to solve the anticipated problems’ tells us that more priority should be given to current problems. This makes assumption implicit.


Example 5: Statement: “The party will start at 6 p.m. You are requested to take your seats before 6 p.m.” – last sentence in an invitation card.
Assumption: The party will start as scheduled.

Since the card says that the invitee should take his seat before 6:00 p.m., it implies that the party will start as scheduled. It has the invitee who will have to see that he/she reaches before 6:00 p.m.

The document Statement & Assumption | CSAT Preparation - UPSC is a part of the UPSC Course CSAT Preparation.
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