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Factual Based Questions - 5 | English for CLAT PDF Download

Directions: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.
What birds were they? He stood on the steps of the library to look at them, leaning wearily on his ashplant. They flew round and round the jutting shoulder of a house in Molesworth Street. The air of the late March evening made clear their flight, their dark darting quivering bodies flying clearly against the sky as against a limp hung cloth of smoky tenuous blue. He watched their flight; bird after bird: a dark flash, a swerve, a flutter of wings.
He tried to count them before all their darting quivering bodies passed: Six, ten, eleven: and wondered were they odd or even in number. Twelve, thirteen: for two came wheeling down from the upper sky. They were flying high and low but ever round and round in straight and curving lines and ever flying from left to right, circling about a temple of air. He listened to the cries: like the squeak of mice behind the wainscot: a shrill twofold note.
But the notes were long and shrill and whirring, unlike the cry of vermin, falling a third or a fourth and trilled as the flying beaks clove the air. Their cry was shrill and clear and fine and falling like threads of silken light unwound from whirring spools. The inhuman clamour soothed his ears in which his mother’s sobs and reproaches murmured insistently and the dark frail quivering bodies wheeling and fluttering and swerving round an airy temple of the tenuous sky soothed his eyes which still saw the image of his mother’s face.
Why was he gazing upwards from the steps of the porch, hearing their shrill twofold cry, watching their flight? For an augury of good or evil? A phrase of Cornelius Agrippa flew through his mind and then there flew hither an thither shapeless thoughts from Swedenborg on the correspondence of birds to things of the intellect and of how the creatures of the air have their knowledge and know their times and seasons because they, unlike man, are in the order of their life and have not perverted that order by reason.
And for ages men had gazed upward as he was gazing at birds in flight. The colonnade above him made him think vaguely of an ancient temple and the ashplant on which he leaned wearily of the curved stick of an augur. A sense of fear of the unknown moved in the heart of his weariness, a fear of symbols and portents, of the hawklike man whose name he bore soaring out of his captivity on osierwoven wings, of Thoth,  the god of writers, writing with a reed upon a tablet and bearing on his narrow ibis head the cusped moon.
[Extracts from A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN and DUBLINERS By JAMES JOYCE]
Q1: What is the setting of the scene described in the paragraph?
(a) A garden
(b) A street
(c) A temple
(d) A library
Ans:
(b)
Sol: The paragraph mentions the character standing on the steps of the library, observing birds flying round and round the jutting shoulder of a house in Molesworth Street.


Q2: What is the significance of the birds' flight in the paragraph?
(a) Augury of good or evil
(b) Symbol of freedom
(c) Representation of vermin
(d) A naturalistic observation
Ans: 
(a)
Sol: The character wonders if he is gazing at the birds for an augury of good or evil, indicating that he is considering their flight as a potential omen.


Q3: How does the character describe the air in the late March evening?
(a) Heavy and oppressive
(b) Clear and smoky
(c) Thick with fog
(d) Hazy and tenuous
Ans: 
(b)
Sol: The paragraph mentions, "The air of the late March evening made clear their flight," suggesting a clear but smoky atmosphere.


Q4: What is the sound of the birds' cries in the paragraph?
(a) Melodious
(b) Harsh and grating
(c) Squeak of mice
(d) A low hum
Ans:
(c)
Sol: The paragraph describes the cries as "like the squeak of mice behind the wainscot."


Q5: What thought crosses the character's mind regarding the creatures of the air?
(a) They are devoid of knowledge
(b) They have perverted their order of life
(c) They are in correspondence with things of the intellect
(d) They lack the ability to fly
Ans: 
(c)
Sol: The paragraph mentions thoughts from Swedenborg on the correspondence of birds to things of the intellect, suggesting a belief in a symbolic connection between birds and knowledge.

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FAQs on Factual Based Questions - 5 - English for CLAT

1. What is the importance of studying history?
Ans. Studying history is important as it helps us understand the past and its impact on the present. It allows us to learn from past mistakes and achievements, shaping our decision-making and providing valuable insights into human behavior and society.
2. How can studying history benefit us in our daily lives?
Ans. Studying history can benefit us in various ways in our daily lives. It enhances critical thinking skills, as it requires analyzing different perspectives and evaluating evidence. It also promotes empathy and cultural understanding, helping us appreciate diverse cultures and viewpoints.
3. What are the different methods used to study history?
Ans. Historians use various methods to study history, including analyzing primary and secondary sources, conducting archival research, and utilizing oral histories. They also employ techniques like comparative analysis, historical interpretation, and chronological reasoning to gain a comprehensive understanding of the past.
4. Can studying history help us predict the future?
Ans. While studying history cannot exactly predict the future, it provides valuable insights into patterns and trends that can inform our understanding of potential outcomes. By studying past events, we can identify similar circumstances and learn from them, which can aid in making informed predictions about future possibilities.
5. How does studying history contribute to personal growth and development?
Ans. Studying history contributes to personal growth and development by fostering a sense of identity, belonging, and cultural appreciation. It enhances critical thinking, research, and analytical skills, which are valuable in various aspects of life, including decision-making, problem-solving, and effective communication. Additionally, studying history helps us develop a broader perspective and a deeper understanding of the world around us.
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