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List of Important Foreign Words - 2 | English for CLAT PDF Download

1. a la carte [French]
adj., adv. with a separate price for each item, printed on the menu; basically it is used to refer to the menu, as opposed to, say, a buffet
Estonian cable operator Elion, an unit of the operator Eesti Telekom, has modified its SmartTV offer on an a-lacarte basis
2. alfresco [Italian]
adj., adv. open air; outdoors
Brighten up the alfresco area using mosaic tiles to create murals and feature walls
3. alma mater [Latin]
n. any institution one has graduated from; in other words, one’s old school or university
Wolmer’s coach Vassell Reynolds will be going up against his alma mater and coaches who were once his schoolmates
4. avant-garde [French]
an artist or group associated with the use of new techniques in their field
The happy convergence of avant-garde art and revolutionary politics is a utopian dream nowhere more celebrated than in the creative foment of the Russian Revolution.
5. Blitzkrieg [German]
n. rapid, intensive attack, originally used to describe sudden military offensives
The Yemen war planned as a blitzkrieg by the Arab coalition has turned into a dragged-out war drawing resources from the coalition.
6. bona fide [Latin]
adj. authentic, genuine, in good faith
We were targeted across Bo’ness, Bonnybridge and Stenhousemuir by callous thieves pretending to be bona fide workmen.
7. c’est la vie [French]

that’s life; such is life
I don’t let the little things bring me down, I just say C’est la vie!’ and keep giving life my best.

8. curriculum vitae (CV) [Latin]

n. resume, i.e., outline of one’s educational and professional qualifications, made for job applications
Although video resumes are not a replacement for the regular curriculum vitae (CV), many recruiters use them as a tool to gauge the candidate.

9. de facto [Latin]
adv. in reality, actually.
Serbia has “de facto” accepted the existence of Kosovo but nationalist sentiment is preventing formal recognition.

adj. existing whether legally recognised or not
The Asian Development Bank has recommended the Cook Islands recognise de-facto relationships, as part of advancing gender equality.

10. déjà vu [French]
the sensation of having previously experienced something that one is experiencing
For investors, this may be deja vu, considering the way tariffs on voice calls and realisations for telecom service providers crashed five years ago, impacting the sector’s profitability amid high debt.
11. doppelgänger [German]

an apparition or double of a living person.
A man met his doppelgänger on a flight – and took a selfie to celebrate the bizarre moment

12. en route [French]
adv. on the way
Harry Belafonte, the activist and performer, was en route to receiving an honor at the Four Seasons Restaurant when he fell ill.
13. ergo [Latin]
conj. therefore; consequently
There are lots of people cheering for me at every event I go to; ergo the polls are wrong and I am winning.
14. ex officio [Latin]
adv. and adj. by virtue of one’s position or status (literally ‘out of duty’)
In 1866, the Salem Municipal Council was formed with the then Collector Charles Norman Pochin appointed as ex officio chairman.
15. faux pas [French]

social blunder
Kim disclosed her beauty faux pas while delivering a speech at the inaugural InStyle awards in LA.

16. fiasco [Italian]
total failure
Norwegian media on Friday blasted a Justin Bieber concert in Oslo as a “fiasco” after the Canadian pop star walked off the stage.
17. guerrilla [Spanish]

a member of an irregular army operating in a territory under the control of a hostile force, i.e the enemy; their warfare is generally hit-and-run, employing sudden attacks and sabotages because they are fewer in number
Deep in the Colombian jungle, guerillas from the Farc (the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia) plan and execute violent terrorist tactics.

18. klutz [Yiddish]
a clumsy person
She’s a comical blend of insane athlete and pathetic klutz.
19. lingua franca [Italian]

common language
This has been a rather remarkable evolution: Rodriguez, a noted baseball transgressor, working for one of baseball’s network partners, talking to a national audience in the lingua franca of baseball before and after each postseason game.

20. nee [French]
adj. born; used for the maiden name of a married woman
Kareena Khan nee Kapoor
21. par excellence [French]

adj. the best at something
It took over half a century for Manorama to rise to the level of a historic comedienne par excellence and become a household name.

22. per capita [Latin]

adj., adv. per person
Estimated US per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 14.6 pounds in 2014, up marginally from the 14.5 pounds consumed in 2013.

23. per se [Latin]
adv. in itself
The film is also edited differently, and is not Bollywood per se.
24. prima donna [Italian]
temperamental entertainer
The prima donna IT guru spends much of the team meeting time boasting of his knowledge, while demeaning that of his peers.
25. Realpolitik [German]
opportunistic politics that concerns itself with ground realities, with self-advancement as the sole driving principle
I no longer think of the former secretary of State as the heartless grandmaster of realpolitik.
26. status quo [Latin]
the existing state of things
The High Court on Saturday ordered to maintain status quo with regard to the two acres of land, situated on Platform Road.
27. tabula rasa [Latin]

blank slate
But the real hero of Makari’s tale is Willis’ student John Locke, who argued that the mind is a tabula rasa on which ideas are inscribed.

28. terra firma [Latin]

hard, firm ground
Offensive coordinator George Godsey kept his offense planted on the terra firma for all of 13 plays, only three of which gained as many as 5 yards.

29. vis-à-vis [French]

adv., adj. face-to-face
The US dollar rate vis a vis the Kuwaiti dinar dropped to KD 0.302 but the euro rose to KD 0.333, in Sunday’s trades.

30. Zeitgeist [German]
the intellectual outlook or spirit characteristic of a particular time period or generation
Street demonstrations and protest movements as cultural memes have hit the zeitgeist like a buzzy new Netflix series this season.
The document List of Important Foreign Words - 2 | English for CLAT is a part of the CLAT Course English for CLAT.
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FAQs on List of Important Foreign Words - 2 - English for CLAT

1. What are some important foreign words commonly used in English?
Ans. Some important foreign words commonly used in English include: - Bon appétit (French): Used to wish someone an enjoyable meal. - Schadenfreude (German): The feeling of pleasure derived from someone else's misfortune. - C'est la vie (French): A phrase meaning "That's life" or "Such is life". - Joie de vivre (French): A feeling of happiness and enjoyment of life. - Hasta la vista (Spanish): A phrase meaning "Until we meet again" or "Goodbye".
2. What is the significance of incorporating foreign words in English language?
Ans. Incorporating foreign words in the English language adds diversity, cultural richness, and enhances communication. It allows for the expression of concepts and ideas that may not have an exact equivalent in English. It also reflects the influence of different cultures on the development of the English language and promotes global understanding and appreciation.
3. How can learning and using foreign words enhance our language skills?
Ans. Learning and using foreign words can enhance our language skills in several ways. Firstly, it expands our vocabulary and allows us to express ourselves more precisely. Secondly, it deepens our understanding of different cultures and their unique linguistic expressions. Thirdly, it improves our communication skills by enabling us to connect with people from different linguistic backgrounds. Lastly, it stimulates cognitive flexibility and creativity by exposing us to different language structures and ways of thinking.
4. Are there any potential challenges in incorporating foreign words in English?
Ans. Yes, there can be potential challenges in incorporating foreign words in English. One challenge is ensuring that the pronunciation and usage of the foreign word are understood correctly by English speakers. Another challenge is maintaining the authenticity and cultural significance of the word while adapting it to fit into the English language. Additionally, some foreign words may not have a direct translation or equivalent in English, making it difficult to convey their exact meaning.
5. How can one effectively incorporate foreign words in their English language usage?
Ans. To effectively incorporate foreign words in English language usage, one can follow these tips: - Understand the meaning and cultural context of the foreign word before using it. - Use foreign words sparingly and appropriately, considering the target audience's familiarity with them. - Provide a brief explanation or context when using a foreign word, especially if it is less commonly known. - Practice correct pronunciation to ensure clarity and understanding. - Be mindful of the cultural sensitivity and appropriateness of using certain foreign words in specific contexts.
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