Section 100 of IPC | Criminal Law for Judiciary Exams PDF Download

Understanding Section 100 of IPC

  • Section 100 of the Indian Penal Code deals with the right of private defence, specifically when this right extends to causing death.
  • This section outlines the circumstances under which an individual can resort to force, including causing death, as a form of private defence.
  • It imposes restrictions on the extent of force that can be used, emphasizing that it must be reasonable and proportionate to the threat faced.

Context and Application of Section 100

  • Section 100 recognizes situations where individuals can use force, including causing death, to defend themselves.
  • This right is not absolute and is subject to the conditions outlined in the law.
  • For instance, it applies to scenarios where there is a reasonable apprehension of death, grievous hurt, assault with the intent of committing specific crimes like rape or kidnapping, or wrongfully confining a person.

Balancing Rights and Accountability

  • The law aims to strike a balance between safeguarding individuals' right to self-defence and ensuring accountability and justice.
  • It underscores the importance of examining facts and evidence to determine if actions taken align with the criteria for private defence.
  • Applying Section 100 requires a nuanced understanding of the circumstances and the proportionality of the response.

Examples of Application

  • For instance, if someone is under a threat that reasonably suggests the possibility of death or grievous harm, they may invoke the right of private defence.
  • In a situation where a person is being wrongfully confined and cannot seek help from authorities, the use of force to secure freedom may be justifiable under this provision.

Question for Section 100 of IPC
Try yourself:
In which situations can an individual invoke the right of private defence, including causing death, as outlined in Section 100 of the IPC?
View Solution

Landmark Cases on Section 100 of IPC

The State of Orissa v. Ghenu Case

  • The Supreme Court acquitted the accused in this case because he caused his brother's death while exercising his right of private defence.
  • The court believed that the accused acted to protect himself or others from a threat, justifying his actions.

Vishwanath v. State of Uttar Pradesh Case

  • In this case, the Supreme Court ruled that the right of private defence, as defined in clause 5 of IPC 100, can be invoked against any assault made for abduction.
  • According to the court, the defender does not need to ascertain the specific intention of the assailant regarding kidnapping or abduction defined under sections 364 to 369 of the Indian Penal Code (IPC).
  • This implies that the defender can use the right of private defence even if unsure of the exact nature of the assailant's intentions as long as it involves abduction.

Is IPC 100 bailable?

  • Bailable Offences: Bailable Offences allow an individual to secure bail as a right, leading to the release of the arrested person upon bail being granted. Bail can be issued by either a police officer or the court, depending on who has custody of the accused.
  • Indian Penal Code Section 100: Section 100 of the Indian Penal Code is an extension of the right of Self Defence, which is detailed in Sections 96 to 106 of the Indian Penal Code.
  • Private Defence Classification: Whether private defence falls under bailable or non-bailable offences remains ambiguous since the General exception does not provide a specific clarification.

What is the Punishment for IPC 100 Case?

  • Sections 96 to 106 of the Indian Penal Code cover the General exceptions of Private Defence.
  • These sections offer a legal defense for individuals who have acted in self-defense and cannot be deemed guilty of an offense.
  • Instead of facing punishment, individuals are shielded by this defense, which aims to protect those who were defending themselves lawfully.
  • Section 96 specifically demonstrates how this defense applies even in situations where self-defense actions lead to causing death.
  • Example: Consider a scenario where an individual, let's call him John, is attacked by an assailant with a knife. In an act of self-defense, John manages to disarm the assailant but inadvertently causes the assailant's death. In this situation, Section 96 of the IPC would come into play to protect John from being held criminally liable.

Is IPC 100 a Cognisable Offence or Non-Cognisable Offence?

  • A non-cognisable offence is one where a police officer lacks the authority to arrest the involved person without a scheduled warrant. Conversely, cognisable offences are cases where the police have the authority to arrest a person without requiring a warrant.
  • Regarding the Indian Penal Code, Section 100 is an extension of the right of self-defense, elaborated in Sections 96 to 106 of the IPC. As private defence falls under general exceptions, it does not explicitly specify whether it is categorized as a cognisable or non-cognisable offence.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Section 100 of the Indian Penal Code is a critical provision that expands the right to private defence. In situations encompassed by this section, individuals may find it necessary to protect themselves or others from imminent harm. Alongside Sections 96 to 106 of the IPC, this provision establishes the framework for general exceptions related to private defence in the Indian legal system.

Question for Section 100 of IPC
Try yourself:
What is the purpose of Section 100 of the Indian Penal Code?
View Solution

The document Section 100 of IPC | Criminal Law for Judiciary Exams is a part of the Judiciary Exams Course Criminal Law for Judiciary Exams.
All you need of Judiciary Exams at this link: Judiciary Exams
93 docs|98 tests

Up next

93 docs|98 tests
Download as PDF

Up next

Explore Courses for Judiciary Exams exam
Signup for Free!
Signup to see your scores go up within 7 days! Learn & Practice with 1000+ FREE Notes, Videos & Tests.
10M+ students study on EduRev
Related Searches

video lectures

,

pdf

,

past year papers

,

Summary

,

Section 100 of IPC | Criminal Law for Judiciary Exams

,

Free

,

Sample Paper

,

Exam

,

Semester Notes

,

MCQs

,

Extra Questions

,

Section 100 of IPC | Criminal Law for Judiciary Exams

,

Objective type Questions

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

Important questions

,

Viva Questions

,

ppt

,

practice quizzes

,

shortcuts and tricks

,

mock tests for examination

,

Section 100 of IPC | Criminal Law for Judiciary Exams

,

study material

;