NCERT Textbook - Conditionals Class 10 Notes | EduRev

English Grammar (Communicative) Interact In English Class 10

Created by: Vinay Thomas

Class 10 : NCERT Textbook - Conditionals Class 10 Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


7
CONDITIONALS
115
A. Introduction
•
•
•
•
•
Read the following sentences:
1. I'll help you if you promise to work hard.
2. If I had the money, I would lend it to you.
3. If we had practised well, we could have won the match.
4. Most dogs snarl if you pull their tail.
You notice that all the above sentences have two parts - a main clause and a 
subordinate clause.
Main Clause Subordinate Clause
All the subordinate clauses in the above sentences begin with 'if'.
Both the clauses express conditions, i.e., one event follows from the other, 
or depends on the other.  In other words, what we express in the main 
clause. depends  - or is conditional - on what we express in the subordinate 
(if) clause 
We can usually change the order of clauses in conditional sentences.       
eg. we can say:  I'll help you if you promise to work hard. We can also say: If 
you promise to work hard, I'll help you.
In general we separate the two clauses by a comma if we begin with an 'if' 
clause.  We don't use a comma when we begin with the main clause.
I’ll help you if you promise to work hard.
Page 2


7
CONDITIONALS
115
A. Introduction
•
•
•
•
•
Read the following sentences:
1. I'll help you if you promise to work hard.
2. If I had the money, I would lend it to you.
3. If we had practised well, we could have won the match.
4. Most dogs snarl if you pull their tail.
You notice that all the above sentences have two parts - a main clause and a 
subordinate clause.
Main Clause Subordinate Clause
All the subordinate clauses in the above sentences begin with 'if'.
Both the clauses express conditions, i.e., one event follows from the other, 
or depends on the other.  In other words, what we express in the main 
clause. depends  - or is conditional - on what we express in the subordinate 
(if) clause 
We can usually change the order of clauses in conditional sentences.       
eg. we can say:  I'll help you if you promise to work hard. We can also say: If 
you promise to work hard, I'll help you.
In general we separate the two clauses by a comma if we begin with an 'if' 
clause.  We don't use a comma when we begin with the main clause.
I’ll help you if you promise to work hard.
116
CBSE
Generally grammar books state that there are three types of conditionals.  
Examples 1, 2 & 3 given above represent the three types.
In this unit we will learn the use of the three types of conditionals.  We will 
also learn the other forms and meaning.
We can rewrite B's response in a sentence using 'if' and 'I'll'
B : I'll take up the new job if I get a good pay package.
Some more examples:
If the weather conditions worsen, planes will be diverted from Delhi.
I'll help you with your assignment if you help me clean my room.
•
•
B   The Likely or Probable Conditional.
•
•
B.1 Read the following dialogue:
A. Will you take up the new job?
B. It depends.  I'm negotiating with the firm.  I must get a good 
    pay package.
Basic Form of the Likely or Probable Conditional
Subordinate Clause
If is doesn’t rain,
future form
Main Clause
we’ll play a match.
If + present tense
Page 3


7
CONDITIONALS
115
A. Introduction
•
•
•
•
•
Read the following sentences:
1. I'll help you if you promise to work hard.
2. If I had the money, I would lend it to you.
3. If we had practised well, we could have won the match.
4. Most dogs snarl if you pull their tail.
You notice that all the above sentences have two parts - a main clause and a 
subordinate clause.
Main Clause Subordinate Clause
All the subordinate clauses in the above sentences begin with 'if'.
Both the clauses express conditions, i.e., one event follows from the other, 
or depends on the other.  In other words, what we express in the main 
clause. depends  - or is conditional - on what we express in the subordinate 
(if) clause 
We can usually change the order of clauses in conditional sentences.       
eg. we can say:  I'll help you if you promise to work hard. We can also say: If 
you promise to work hard, I'll help you.
In general we separate the two clauses by a comma if we begin with an 'if' 
clause.  We don't use a comma when we begin with the main clause.
I’ll help you if you promise to work hard.
116
CBSE
Generally grammar books state that there are three types of conditionals.  
Examples 1, 2 & 3 given above represent the three types.
In this unit we will learn the use of the three types of conditionals.  We will 
also learn the other forms and meaning.
We can rewrite B's response in a sentence using 'if' and 'I'll'
B : I'll take up the new job if I get a good pay package.
Some more examples:
If the weather conditions worsen, planes will be diverted from Delhi.
I'll help you with your assignment if you help me clean my room.
•
•
B   The Likely or Probable Conditional.
•
•
B.1 Read the following dialogue:
A. Will you take up the new job?
B. It depends.  I'm negotiating with the firm.  I must get a good 
    pay package.
Basic Form of the Likely or Probable Conditional
Subordinate Clause
If is doesn’t rain,
future form
Main Clause
we’ll play a match.
If + present tense
117
CBSE
Other Forms of the Likely or Probable Conditionals
if + present imperative
If you go out           do not forget to bring the grocery
If the management does not accede to our demands, we 
are extending our strike to an indefinite period.
future form
If you are looking for the Principal, you’ll find him in the 
auditorium
If you have finished reading, I’ll switch the light off.
if + present present continuous
if + present 
continuous
if + present perfect
future form
If you feel hot, you may open the window.
We can also sometimes use 'should' in place of 'if' in more 
formal contexts: 
Should the inflation continue to rise, the Reserve Bank of India 
will increase the interest rates.
may/ might, must, 
should, can
if + present
Page 4


7
CONDITIONALS
115
A. Introduction
•
•
•
•
•
Read the following sentences:
1. I'll help you if you promise to work hard.
2. If I had the money, I would lend it to you.
3. If we had practised well, we could have won the match.
4. Most dogs snarl if you pull their tail.
You notice that all the above sentences have two parts - a main clause and a 
subordinate clause.
Main Clause Subordinate Clause
All the subordinate clauses in the above sentences begin with 'if'.
Both the clauses express conditions, i.e., one event follows from the other, 
or depends on the other.  In other words, what we express in the main 
clause. depends  - or is conditional - on what we express in the subordinate 
(if) clause 
We can usually change the order of clauses in conditional sentences.       
eg. we can say:  I'll help you if you promise to work hard. We can also say: If 
you promise to work hard, I'll help you.
In general we separate the two clauses by a comma if we begin with an 'if' 
clause.  We don't use a comma when we begin with the main clause.
I’ll help you if you promise to work hard.
116
CBSE
Generally grammar books state that there are three types of conditionals.  
Examples 1, 2 & 3 given above represent the three types.
In this unit we will learn the use of the three types of conditionals.  We will 
also learn the other forms and meaning.
We can rewrite B's response in a sentence using 'if' and 'I'll'
B : I'll take up the new job if I get a good pay package.
Some more examples:
If the weather conditions worsen, planes will be diverted from Delhi.
I'll help you with your assignment if you help me clean my room.
•
•
B   The Likely or Probable Conditional.
•
•
B.1 Read the following dialogue:
A. Will you take up the new job?
B. It depends.  I'm negotiating with the firm.  I must get a good 
    pay package.
Basic Form of the Likely or Probable Conditional
Subordinate Clause
If is doesn’t rain,
future form
Main Clause
we’ll play a match.
If + present tense
117
CBSE
Other Forms of the Likely or Probable Conditionals
if + present imperative
If you go out           do not forget to bring the grocery
If the management does not accede to our demands, we 
are extending our strike to an indefinite period.
future form
If you are looking for the Principal, you’ll find him in the 
auditorium
If you have finished reading, I’ll switch the light off.
if + present present continuous
if + present 
continuous
if + present perfect
future form
If you feel hot, you may open the window.
We can also sometimes use 'should' in place of 'if' in more 
formal contexts: 
Should the inflation continue to rise, the Reserve Bank of India 
will increase the interest rates.
may/ might, must, 
should, can
if + present
118
CBSE
B.2 Follow the patterns discussed in B1 and write sentences using the ideas 
in the table below. You will need to match the items first. 
B. 3 Complete the following conditional sentences using the clues given.  
A B
go/ walk enough/ money
write/ letter weather/ fine
go/ cinema get/ ticket
go/ shopping (not) go/ out
pass exams enough/ work
I'll go for a walk if the weather is fine.
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
Underline the pair of verbs in each of the Conditional sentences you have 
written above, and say what tense they are in.
1. I'll take you out in the evening if …………………………………………………...
     (let/ do/ work/ now - persuasion)
2. If you travel without reservation, ……………………………………………………
     (be/ ask/ to get off the train-warning)
Page 5


7
CONDITIONALS
115
A. Introduction
•
•
•
•
•
Read the following sentences:
1. I'll help you if you promise to work hard.
2. If I had the money, I would lend it to you.
3. If we had practised well, we could have won the match.
4. Most dogs snarl if you pull their tail.
You notice that all the above sentences have two parts - a main clause and a 
subordinate clause.
Main Clause Subordinate Clause
All the subordinate clauses in the above sentences begin with 'if'.
Both the clauses express conditions, i.e., one event follows from the other, 
or depends on the other.  In other words, what we express in the main 
clause. depends  - or is conditional - on what we express in the subordinate 
(if) clause 
We can usually change the order of clauses in conditional sentences.       
eg. we can say:  I'll help you if you promise to work hard. We can also say: If 
you promise to work hard, I'll help you.
In general we separate the two clauses by a comma if we begin with an 'if' 
clause.  We don't use a comma when we begin with the main clause.
I’ll help you if you promise to work hard.
116
CBSE
Generally grammar books state that there are three types of conditionals.  
Examples 1, 2 & 3 given above represent the three types.
In this unit we will learn the use of the three types of conditionals.  We will 
also learn the other forms and meaning.
We can rewrite B's response in a sentence using 'if' and 'I'll'
B : I'll take up the new job if I get a good pay package.
Some more examples:
If the weather conditions worsen, planes will be diverted from Delhi.
I'll help you with your assignment if you help me clean my room.
•
•
B   The Likely or Probable Conditional.
•
•
B.1 Read the following dialogue:
A. Will you take up the new job?
B. It depends.  I'm negotiating with the firm.  I must get a good 
    pay package.
Basic Form of the Likely or Probable Conditional
Subordinate Clause
If is doesn’t rain,
future form
Main Clause
we’ll play a match.
If + present tense
117
CBSE
Other Forms of the Likely or Probable Conditionals
if + present imperative
If you go out           do not forget to bring the grocery
If the management does not accede to our demands, we 
are extending our strike to an indefinite period.
future form
If you are looking for the Principal, you’ll find him in the 
auditorium
If you have finished reading, I’ll switch the light off.
if + present present continuous
if + present 
continuous
if + present perfect
future form
If you feel hot, you may open the window.
We can also sometimes use 'should' in place of 'if' in more 
formal contexts: 
Should the inflation continue to rise, the Reserve Bank of India 
will increase the interest rates.
may/ might, must, 
should, can
if + present
118
CBSE
B.2 Follow the patterns discussed in B1 and write sentences using the ideas 
in the table below. You will need to match the items first. 
B. 3 Complete the following conditional sentences using the clues given.  
A B
go/ walk enough/ money
write/ letter weather/ fine
go/ cinema get/ ticket
go/ shopping (not) go/ out
pass exams enough/ work
I'll go for a walk if the weather is fine.
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
Underline the pair of verbs in each of the Conditional sentences you have 
written above, and say what tense they are in.
1. I'll take you out in the evening if …………………………………………………...
     (let/ do/ work/ now - persuasion)
2. If you travel without reservation, ……………………………………………………
     (be/ ask/ to get off the train-warning)
119
CBSE
3. If you insult my brother again, ……………………………………………………….
    (complain/ to/ the principal - threat )
4. If the rain continues to be heavy, ………………………………. (school sports 
day/ be/ cancel- possibility)
5. If he exercises regularly …………………………………………………… (lose 
weight -ability)
6. If your claims are in order, ……………………. (get a refund -possibility)
7. If you've completed your project, ……………………………. (leave at once-
permission)
8. ……………………………………, if you want me to give you good marks. 
(improve/ handwriting -command)
9. If you meet my sister, ____________________________? (you/ ask/ her/ call/ 
me- request)
C. The 'Unreal' or 'Hypothetical' Conditional.
C.1 Read the imaginary situations given below and complete the sentence 
that describes the situation in each case.  One has been done for you as an 
example.
Example:
You have always wanted to be the owner 
of a five-star hotel.What would you do if 
you won a million rupees?
If I won a million rupees, I would build 
a five-star hotel.
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