CLAT  >  Passage Based Questions for CLAT Preparation  >  Passage Based Questions: Legal Aptitude - 6

Passage Based Questions: Legal Aptitude - 6 Notes | Study Passage Based Questions for CLAT Preparation - CLAT

Document Description: Passage Based Questions: Legal Aptitude - 6 for CLAT 2022 is part of Passage Based Questions for CLAT Preparation preparation. The notes and questions for Passage Based Questions: Legal Aptitude - 6 have been prepared according to the CLAT exam syllabus. Information about Passage Based Questions: Legal Aptitude - 6 covers topics like and Passage Based Questions: Legal Aptitude - 6 Example, for CLAT 2022 Exam. Find important definitions, questions, notes, meanings, examples, exercises and tests below for Passage Based Questions: Legal Aptitude - 6.

Introduction of Passage Based Questions: Legal Aptitude - 6 in English is available as part of our Passage Based Questions for CLAT Preparation for CLAT & Passage Based Questions: Legal Aptitude - 6 in Hindi for Passage Based Questions for CLAT Preparation course. Download more important topics related with notes, lectures and mock test series for CLAT Exam by signing up for free. CLAT: Passage Based Questions: Legal Aptitude - 6 Notes | Study Passage Based Questions for CLAT Preparation - CLAT
1 Crore+ students have signed up on EduRev. Have you?

Directions: Read the following passage and answer the questions.
Facial recognition technology is no longer the realm of movies and science fiction. Just last month, newspapers reported that Delhi Police used facial recognition to identify “habitual protestors” and “rowdy elements”. At the PM’s rally on December 22, it was used to deny entry to “miscreants” who could raise slogans and banners”. In Chennai, it identifies “suspicious looking people” in crowded areas while Punjab Police use it to investigate crimes and gather intelligence in real time. What’s more, the ministry of home affairs has proposed a nationwide Automated Facial Recognition System (AFRS) that will use images from CCTV cameras, newspapers and raids to identify criminals against existing records in the Crime and Criminal Tracking Networks and System (CCTNS) database.
Those who use it claim that it introduces efficiency, speed and reduces costs in both state and retail efforts. Law enforcement agencies, for instance, have stated that they will find missing children, catch criminals, and preserve law and order with it. As our fears about the threat to privacy, these are brushed at criminals, not law-abiding citizens.
The “civilian” benefits of this tech are also touted. DigiYatra promises a seamless, paperless, hassle-free experience at airports by eliminating long security lines or check-in procedures. Retail users such as a tea chain claim to make customers ‘experience more enjoyable by billing them through facial recognition instead of needing them to reach for their wallet.
These paint a picture of progress and efficiency at first glance, but in reality buy into at least one (and often all ) of the following fallacies.
Facial recognition is not merely a collection of pictures. It creates a biometric map of one’s face which is then used for verification of a person (1 : 1 matching) or identification of the person from an existing database(1: many matching). Facial recognition is thus, by definition, a threat to privacy. In 2017, the Supreme Court recognised the fundamental right to privacy and explicitly noted that this right extends to public spaces. Further, it laid down that any infringement of this right must be necessary, proportionate, in pursuit of a legitimate aim, and have a rational nexus with the aim. Applying this four part test in 2019, the Bombay high court laid down that the State cannot simply claim law and order or security to infringe on the right to privacy, but must rather, demonstrate that its action meets the proportionality test. Current deployments do not satisfy this legal requirement. In fact, the legal basis for law enforcement use of facial recognition does not exist. Responding to the Internet Freedom Foundation, the home ministry traces the legality of the AFRS to a cabinet note from 2009.However, a Cabinet note is a document of procedure, not law and does not qualify as a valid legal basis. Similarly, Delhi Police’s use of facial recognition was first directed in January 2018 by the Delhi high court for a very specific use- to find missing children. Its current usage has evolved without any legal oversight, and now includes monitoring peaceful protests. The legal fallacy thus has a high cost -it paves the way for mission creep, which is particularly worrying in the absence of data protection safeguards.

Question for Passage Based Questions: Legal Aptitude - 6
Try yourself:Mr. Murti a political activist and a Phd scholar was denied entry into his convocation ceremony at IIT Kanpur with PM as chief guest due to presence of AFRS. What action Mr. Murti can take in his own interest?
View Solution

Question for Passage Based Questions: Legal Aptitude - 6
Try yourself:In order to provide legal basis of the AFRS responding to Internet Freedom Foundation the ‘state’ (home ministry’) cited
View Solution

Question for Passage Based Questions: Legal Aptitude - 6
Try yourself:According to the author the AFRS is a threat to privacy because
View Solution

Question for Passage Based Questions: Legal Aptitude - 6
Try yourself:Police installed facial recognition system at Lucknow Mahotsav to recognise the children lost in the fair. The organizers objected that it is in the detrimental interest to the crowd pull. On which of the following grounds they can do so?
View Solution

Question for Passage Based Questions: Legal Aptitude - 6
Try yourself:What are the civilian benefits of automated facial recognition system according to the passage?
View Solution

The document Passage Based Questions: Legal Aptitude - 6 Notes | Study Passage Based Questions for CLAT Preparation - CLAT is a part of the CLAT Course Passage Based Questions for CLAT Preparation.
All you need of CLAT at this link: CLAT

Related Searches

study material

,

Exam

,

shortcuts and tricks

,

pdf

,

video lectures

,

MCQs

,

Summary

,

Sample Paper

,

Objective type Questions

,

past year papers

,

Passage Based Questions: Legal Aptitude - 6 Notes | Study Passage Based Questions for CLAT Preparation - CLAT

,

Viva Questions

,

Passage Based Questions: Legal Aptitude - 6 Notes | Study Passage Based Questions for CLAT Preparation - CLAT

,

Passage Based Questions: Legal Aptitude - 6 Notes | Study Passage Based Questions for CLAT Preparation - CLAT

,

Extra Questions

,

practice quizzes

,

Free

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

ppt

,

mock tests for examination

,

Important questions

,

Semester Notes

;