The Transgender Judgment: National Legal Services Authority v. Union of India [2014 SC] Notes | Study Legal Reasoning for CLAT - CLAT

CLAT: The Transgender Judgment: National Legal Services Authority v. Union of India [2014 SC] Notes | Study Legal Reasoning for CLAT - CLAT

The document The Transgender Judgment: National Legal Services Authority v. Union of India [2014 SC] Notes | Study Legal Reasoning for CLAT - CLAT is a part of the CLAT Course Legal Reasoning for CLAT.
All you need of CLAT at this link: CLAT

2. We are, in this case, concerned with the grievances of the members of Transgender Community who seek a legal declaration of their gender identity than the one assigned to them, male or female, at the time of birth and their prayer is that non-recognition of their gender identity violates Articles 14 and 21 of the Constitution. Hijras/Eunuchs, who also fall in that group, claim legal status as a third gender with all legal and constitutional protection.

3. The National Legal Services Authority, constituted under the Legal Services Authority Act to provide free legal services to the weaker and other marginalized sections of the society, has come forward to advocate their cause, by filing a Writ Petition in 2012.

4. Transgender is generally an umbrella term for persons whose gender identity, gender expression or behavior does not conform to their biological sex. TG may also take in persons who do not identify with their sex assigned at birth, which include Hijras/Eunuchs who do not identify as either male or female. Hijras are not men by virtue of anatomy appearance and psychologically, they are also not women, though they are like women with no female reproduction organ and no menstruation. Since Hijras do not have reproduction capacities as either men or women, they are neither men nor women and claim to be an institutional “third gender”.

5. Articles 15 and 16 sought to prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex, recognizing that sex discrimination is a historical fact and needs to be addressed. Both gender and biological attributes constitute distinct components of sex. Biological characteristics, of course, include genitals, chromosomes and secondary sexual features, but gender attributes include one’s self image, the deep psychological or emotional sense of sexual identity and character. The discrimination on the ground of ‘sex’ under Articles 15 and 16, therefore, includes discrimination on the ground of gender identity. The expression ‘sex’ used in Articles 15 and 16 is not just limited to biological sex of male or female, but intended to include people who consider themselves to be neither male or female.

6. TGs have been systematically denied rights under Article 15(2), that is, not to be subjected to any disability, liability, restriction in regard to access to public places.

TGs have also not been afforded special provisions envisaged under Article 15(4) for the advancement of the socially and educationally backward classes (SEBC) of citizens, which they are, and hence legally entitled and eligible to get the benefits of SEBC. State is bound to take some affirmative action for their advancement so that the injustice done to them for centuries could be remedied.

TGs have also been denied rights under Article 16(2) and discriminated against in respect of employment under the State on the ground of sex. TGs are also entitled to reservation in the matter of appointment, as envisaged under Article 16(4) of the Constitution. State is bound to take affirmative action to give them due representation in public services.


62. Article 19(1) guarantees those great basic rights which are recognized and guaranteed as the natural rights inherent in the status of the citizen of a free country. Article 19(1) (a) states that all citizens shall have the right to freedom of speech and expression, which includes one’s right to expression of his self-identified gender. Self-identified gender can be expressed through dress, words, action or behavior or any other form. No restriction can be placed on one’s personal appearance or choice of dressing, subject to the restrictions contained in Article 19(2) .

63. The freedom of expression guaranteed under Article 19(1)(a) includes the freedom to express one’s chosen gender identity through varied ways and means by way of expression, speech, mannerism, clothing etc.

64. Gender identity, therefore, lies at the core of one’s personal identity, gender expression and presentation and, therefore, it will have to be protected under Article 19(1)(a) . A transgender’s personality could be expressed by the transgender’s behavior and presentation. State cannot prohibit, restrict or interfere with a transgender’s expression of such personality, which reflects that inherent personality. Often the State and its authorities either due to ignorance or otherwise fail to digest the innate character and identity of such persons.

We, therefore, hold that values of privacy, self-identity, autonomy and personal integrity are fundamental rights guaranteed to members of the transgender community under Article 19(1)(a)  and the State is bound to protect and recognize those rights.

Article 21 is the heart and soul of the Indian Constitution, which speaks of the rights to life and personal liberty. Article 21 takes all those aspects of life which go to make a person’s life meaningful. Right to dignity has been recognized to be an essential part of the right to life and accrues to all persons on account of being humans [Francis Coralie Mullin v. Administrator, Union Territory of Delhi 1981 SC].

68. Recognition of one’s gender identity lies at the heart of the fundamental right to dignity. Gender constitutes the core of one’s sense of being as well as an integral part of a person’s identity. Legal recognition of gender identity is, therefore, part of right to dignity and freedom guaranteed under our Constitution.

69. Article 21 guarantees the protection of “personal autonomy” of an individual. In Anuj Garg v. Hotel Association of India [2008], this Court held that personal autonomy includes both the negative right of not to be subject to interference by others and the positive right of individuals to make decisions about their life, to express themselves and to choose which activities to take part in. Self-determination of gender is an integral part of personal autonomy and self-expression and falls within the realm of personal liberty guaranteed under Article 21 .

70. Self-identified gender can be either male or female or a third gender. Hijras are identified as persons of third gender and are not identified either as male or female. Gender identity refers to a person’s internal sense of being male, female or a transgender, for example Hijras do not identify as female because of their lack of female genitalia or lack of reproductive capability. This distinction makes them separate from both male and female genders and they consider themselves neither man nor woman, but a “third gender”. Hijras, therefore, belong to a distinct socio-religious and cultural group and have, therefore, to be considered as a “third gender”, apart from male and female.

71. Article 21 protects one’s right of self- determination of the gender to which a person belongs. Gender identity is integral to the dignity of an individual and is at the core of “personal autonomy” and “self-determination”. Hijras/Eunuchs, therefore, have to be considered as Third Gender, over and above binary genders.

72. Articles 14, 15, 16, 19 and 21 do not exclude Hijras/Transgenders from its ambit, but Indian law on the whole recognize the paradigm of binary genders of male and female, based on one’s biological sex. We cannot accept the Corbett principle of “Biological Test”, rather we prefer to follow the psyche of the person in determining sex and gender and prefer the “Psychological Test” instead of “Biological Test”. Binary notion of gender reflects in the Indian Penal Code, for example, Section 8, 10, etc. and also in the laws related to marriage, adoption, divorce, inheritance, succession and other welfare legislations like NAREGA, 2005, etc.

73. Article 14 has used the expression “person” and the Article 15 has used the expression “citizen” and “sex” so also Article 16. Article 19 has also used the expression “citizen”. Article 21 has used the expression “person”. All these expressions, which are “gender neutral” evidently refer to human-beings. Hence, they take within their sweep Hijras/Transgenders and are not as such limited to male or female gender.

74. We, therefore, conclude that discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity includes any discrimination, exclusion, restriction or preference, which has the effect of nullifying or transposing equality by the law or the equal protection of laws guaranteed under our Constitution, and hence we are inclined to give various directions to safeguard the constitutional rights of the members of the TG community.

75. We, therefore, declare:

(1) Hijras, Eunuchs, apart from binary gender, be treated as “third gender” for the purpose of safeguarding their rights under Part III of our Constitution and the laws made by the Parliament and the State Legislature.

(2) Transgender persons’ right to decide their self-identified gender is also upheld and the Centre and State Governments are directed to grant legal recognition of their gender identity such as male, female or as third gender.

(3) We direct the Centre and the State Governments to take steps to treat them as socially and educationally backward classes of citizens and extend all kinds of reservation in cases of admission in educational institutions and for public appointments.

(4) Centre and State Governments are directed to operate separate HIV Sero-survellance Centres since Hijras/ Transgenders face several sexual health issues.

(5) Centre and State Governments should seriously address the problems being faced by Hijras/Transgenders such as fear, shame, gender dysphoria, social stigma, etc. and any insistence for SRS for declaring one’s gender is immoral and illegal.

(6) Centre and State Governments should take proper measures to provide medical care to TGs in the hospitals and also provide them separate public toilets and other facilities.

(7) Centre and State Governments should also take steps for framing various social welfare schemes for their betterment.

(8) Centre and State Governments should take steps to create public awareness so that TGs will feel that they are also part and parcel of the social life and be not treated as untouchables.


131. Writ Petitions are, accordingly, allowed, as above.

 (K.S. Radhakrishnan), (A.K. Sikri)

April 15, 2014.

The document The Transgender Judgment: National Legal Services Authority v. Union of India [2014 SC] Notes | Study Legal Reasoning for CLAT - CLAT is a part of the CLAT Course Legal Reasoning for CLAT.
All you need of CLAT at this link: CLAT
60 videos|59 docs|51 tests

Download free EduRev App

Track your progress, build streaks, highlight & save important lessons and more!

Related Searches

Summary

,

The Transgender Judgment: National Legal Services Authority v. Union of India [2014 SC] Notes | Study Legal Reasoning for CLAT - CLAT

,

video lectures

,

Free

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

Objective type Questions

,

shortcuts and tricks

,

study material

,

Important questions

,

practice quizzes

,

pdf

,

Sample Paper

,

The Transgender Judgment: National Legal Services Authority v. Union of India [2014 SC] Notes | Study Legal Reasoning for CLAT - CLAT

,

mock tests for examination

,

Exam

,

Viva Questions

,

Extra Questions

,

ppt

,

The Transgender Judgment: National Legal Services Authority v. Union of India [2014 SC] Notes | Study Legal Reasoning for CLAT - CLAT

,

past year papers

,

MCQs

,

Semester Notes

;