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Tone Based Questions - 4 | English for CLAT PDF Download

Directions: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.
And then the two things happened to William. The first thing I heard about was on a Saturday in late May. It was the anniversary of David’s finding out about his illness, and when William called me I (so stupidly) thought he was calling me about that, and I was surprised and touched that he remembered the exact date. I said, “Oh Pillie, thank you for calling,” and he said, “What?” And then I said it was the first-year anniversary of David’s illness, and he said, “Oh God, Lucy, I’m sorry,” and I said, “No, it’s okay, tell me why you called.” And he did say, “Oh Lucy, I’ll call back another day. It can wait.” And I said, “Who cares about another day? Tell me now.” So William told me how that morning he had finally gone onto the ancestry website that Estelle had gotten him a subscription for, and then—sounding as though he was having a conversation about a tennis game he had just seen that was interesting—he told me. This is what he found: His mother had had a child before he was born. With her husband Clyde Trask, the potato farmer in Maine. This child was two years older than William, and the website stated her maiden name as Lois Trask and the child Lois had been born in Houlton, Maine, near where Catherine had lived with her first husband, the potato farmer husband Clyde Trask. The birth certificate stated Catherine Cole Trask as her mother and Clyde Trask as her father. Clyde Trask had married someone else when Lois was two years old; there was a marriage certificate for that as well. William could find no death certificate for Lois, only a marriage certificate from 1969, her name was now Lois Bubar—“I looked up how to pronounce it, and it’s boo-bar,” William said with some sarcasm—and the names of her children, and grandchildren. Her husband had a death certificate from five years ago. William asked what I thought of that and then said, almost casually, “It’s ridiculous, of course, it can’t be true. I bet these sites have all kinds of misinformation on them.” I got up and moved to a different chair. I asked him to take me through the steps again; I knew nothing about these websites. So he did, patiently, and as I listened—and I mean this literally—I got chills down my side. “Lucy?” he said. After a moment I said, “I think it has to be true, William.” “It’s not true,” he said, firmly. “God, Lucy. Catherine would never have left a child, and even if she ever did— which she wouldn’t have—she would have spoken to someone about it.” “Why are you so sure?”
Q1: What tone does Lucy exhibit when she realizes the significance of William's discovery on the ancestry website?
(a) Indifference
(b) Skepticism
(c) Amazement
(d) Confusion
Ans: (c)
Sol: Lucy's reaction to William's discovery about his mother's previous child is one of amazement. This is evident when she experiences chills down her side as she comprehends the truth in William's findings, indicating a deep, emotional realization.


Q2: In the passage, William's tone when discussing the ancestry website's information can best be described as:
(a) Accepting
(b) Dismissive
(c) Curious
(d) Excited
Ans: (b)
Sol: William's tone is dismissive, as indicated by his casual mention of the discovery and his quick assertion that the information is likely incorrect. His sarcasm and firm denial further support this tone.


Q3: The tone used by the author to describe the background information about Clyde Trask and Lois is primarily:
(a) Narrative
(b) Persuasive
(c) Expository
(d) Descriptive
Ans: (c)
Sol: The tone in this part of the passage is expository, as it provides detailed background information about Clyde Trask, Lois, and their family history in a clear and informative manner.


Q4: How does the tone of Lucy's inquiry about William's certainty on his mother's actions contrast with William's response?
(a) Lucy's tone is inquisitive and open-minded, whereas William's response is definitive and closed.
(b) Lucy's tone is doubtful and anxious, while William's is reassuring and calm.
(c) Lucy's tone is confrontational, compared to William's evasive reply.
(d) Lucy's tone is empathetic and supportive, in contrast to William's indifferent attitude.
Ans: (a)
Sol: Lucy's tone is characterized by a genuine inquiry and openness to possibilities, as she asks William to explain again, showing willingness to understand. In contrast, William's tone is firm and closed, as he insists that the information cannot be true.


Q5: The overall tone of the passage when discussing the ancestry website's findings can best be described as:
(a) Optimistic
(b) Melancholic
(c) Mystified
(d) Reflective
Ans: (c)
Sol: The passage carries a tone of mystification, especially in the way the characters react to the unexpected discovery of William's half-sibling. The elements of surprise, disbelief, and the unfolding mystery contribute to this tone.

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FAQs on Tone Based Questions - 4 - English for CLAT

1. What is the importance of tone in writing?
Ans. Tone in writing is the way the writer expresses their attitude, feelings, or opinions towards the subject matter. It plays a crucial role in conveying the intended message and engaging the audience effectively. By using the appropriate tone, writers can establish a connection with their readers, evoke certain emotions, and create a desired impact.
2. How does tone affect the overall meaning of a text?
Ans. The tone of a text can significantly impact its overall meaning. Different tones can evoke different emotions and reactions from the readers, shaping their interpretation of the content. For example, a sarcastic tone may convey irony or humor, while a serious tone may emphasize the importance or gravity of the subject matter. Thus, the tone sets the overall mood and influences how the message is perceived.
3. What are the different types of tones in writing?
Ans. There are various types of tones that writers can utilize in their writing to convey different emotions or attitudes. Some common examples include: - Formal tone: Used in professional or academic writing to maintain a serious and respectful demeanor. - Informal tone: More relaxed and conversational, often used in casual or personal writing. - Persuasive tone: Aimed at convincing or persuading the readers to adopt a certain viewpoint or take action. - Humorous tone: Used to entertain the audience and provoke laughter. - Authoritative tone: Conveys expertise and commands attention, often used in instructional or informational writing.
4. How can writers effectively establish the desired tone in their writing?
Ans. Writers can employ several techniques to establish the desired tone in their writing: - Vocabulary: Carefully choosing words that align with the intended tone can greatly influence the reader's perception. - Sentence structure: Utilizing different sentence lengths and structures can create a specific rhythm or flow, contributing to the overall tone. - Figurative language: Employing metaphors, similes, or other forms of figurative language can enhance the tone and make it more vivid. - Tone indicators: Using specific phrases or expressions can directly convey the desired tone to the readers. - Context and subject matter: The overall context and subject matter can also contribute to establishing the tone. For example, a medical article may require a serious and informative tone, while a blog post about travel can have a more casual and enthusiastic tone.
5. Why is it important to consider the intended audience when determining the tone of writing?
Ans. Considering the intended audience is crucial when determining the tone of writing because different tones resonate differently with different groups of people. It is essential to understand the readers' preferences, expectations, and cultural background. By tailoring the tone to the target audience, writers can effectively connect with them, hold their attention, and ensure the message is received and understood in the desired way.
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