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Detailed Explanation: Simple Present Tense Video Lecture | Verbal Ability (VA) & Reading Comprehension (RC) - CAT

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FAQs on Detailed Explanation: Simple Present Tense Video Lecture - Verbal Ability (VA) & Reading Comprehension (RC) - CAT

1. What is the simple present tense?
Ans. The simple present tense is a verb tense used to describe actions or states that are habitual, factual, or generally true. It is used to talk about regular activities, facts, and universal truths. In English, the simple present tense is formed by using the base form of the verb, except for the third-person singular form which adds an "s" or "es" to the verb.
2. How do we form the simple present tense?
Ans. To form the simple present tense, we generally use the base form of the verb. For most verbs, this means simply using the verb without any changes. However, for third-person singular subjects (he, she, it), we add an "s" or "es" to the verb. For example, "I walk to work every day" (base form), but "She walks to work every day" (third-person singular form).
3. What are some common adverbs used with the simple present tense?
Ans. Some common adverbs that are commonly used with the simple present tense include "always," "usually," "often," "sometimes," and "never." These adverbs help to indicate the frequency or regularity of an action. For example, "I always drink coffee in the morning" or "He never eats vegetables."
4. Can we use the simple present tense to talk about future events?
Ans. Yes, the simple present tense can be used to talk about future events that are scheduled or timetabled. In this case, the present tense indicates a fixed or predetermined plan. For example, "The concert starts at 8 PM tomorrow" or "The train leaves at 10 AM on Monday."
5. Are there any exceptions to the formation of the simple present tense?
Ans. Yes, there are some exceptions to the formation of the simple present tense. For example, with verbs ending in -y preceded by a consonant, the -y changes to -ies in the third-person singular form. For example, "I study every day" (base form), but "She studies every day" (third-person singular form). Additionally, some irregular verbs have unique forms in the simple present tense that do not follow the standard rules.
126 videos|422 docs|177 tests
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