The two construction periods at Aztec, New Mexico, as indicated by the modern tree-ring dating, are corroborated nicely by other evidence found by archaeologist Earl H. Morris in the 1920’s that Aztec actually was built by one group of people, abandoned, and then reoccupied at a later date by a slightly different group of people. Throughout all the rooms he dug during his early 20th century excavations, he found sterile layers of windblown sand and ruined debris from falling walls and ceilings. In this debris and under the sand, he found Chaco-like pottery and artifacts. In addition, there were surprisingly few burial sites. Even today, archeologists have located few Chaco-type burials in Chaco Canyon itself. Whatever the burial customs of the Chaco people may have been, they have eluded archeologists for many decades. The absence of burials of this period at Aztec is a clue that probably a group of Chaco-like people, bearing the distinctive Chaco culture, may actually have moved into the Aztec area.
Granting that the local sandstone was not quite as easily worked as that at Chaco, the large-size rooms, the high ceilings, the banded-veneer masonry walls, the large doorways, and other techniques used were very similar to the architectural techniques of the Chaco area. Overlying the Chaco debris and sterile sand layers, Morris found pottery, household utensils, and burials characteristic of the classic Mesa Verde Period—a period which occurred later than the great Chaco Period. In addition, there were obvious architectural signs of rebuilding and remodeling within the pueblo. Large Chaco-type rooms had been made smaller by wattle-and-daub partition walls, while doorways had been shortened and narrowed more like the ones at Mesa Verde. Thus there were two definite periods of occupation at Aztec, one by a Chaco-like people and one by a Mesa Verde-type people.
The author of the passage likely mentions both Morris and the tree-ring dates in order to
  • a)
    Explain how both natural and man-made evidence contributes to debunking a myth about a particular site.
  • b)
    Describe how the later remodeling of Aztec was in the Mesa Verde-style.
  • c)
    Challenge the idea that the Mesa Verde people preceded the Chaco people at Aztec.
  • d)
    Bolster his/her own argument through both recently discovered and historical evidence.
  • e)
    Prove that only the Chaco and Mesa Verde people lived at Aztec.
Correct answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer?

GMAT Question

Harmanjot Singh answered Apr 07, 2020
 Passage Analysis
Summary and Main Point
Pre-Thinking
This is a Function question. Let’s review the relevant part of the passage. The two construction periods at Aztec, New Mexico, as indicated by the modern tree-ring dates, are corroborated nicely by other evidence found by archaeologist Earl H. Morris in the 1920’s that Aztec actually was built by one group of people, abandoned, and then reoccupied at a later date by a slightly different group of people.
So the author mentions the “modern” tree-ring dates and the older evidence to support his statement that Aztec was inhabited by two different groups of people.
Answer Choices
A
Explain how both natural and man-made evidence contributes to debunking a myth about a particular site.
Incorrect: Irrelevant
This is out of scope. The author is not concerned with the different types of evidence, and there is no mention of any kind of any myth related to the Aztec, New Mexico, site.
B
Describe how the later remodeling of Aztec was in the Mesa Verde-style.
Incorrect: Inconsistent
This is a misused detail from the passage. In fact, there is no mention of this style in the first paragraph.
C
Challenge the idea that the Mesa Verde people preceded the Chaco people at Aztec.
Incorrect: Out of Context
The passage does not suggest anyone is making such a claim.
D
Bolster his/her own argument through both recently discovered and historical evidence.
Correct
Ask yourself: why would the author mention both “modern” tree-rings and Morris’ work from the 1920’s? Likely to give a broad range of evidence, both historical and contemporary, to support his/her theory.
E
Prove that only the Chaco and Mesa Verde people lived at Aztec.
Incorrect: Out of Context
We do not know if the Chaco and the Mesa Verde were the “only” groups to live at Aztec. There could have been more. This is outside the scope of the passage.

This discussion on The two construction periods at Aztec, New Mexico, as indicated by the modern tree-ring dating, are corroborated nicely by other evidence found by archaeologist Earl H. Morris in the 1920s that Aztec actually was built by one group of people, abandoned, and then reoccupied at a later date by a slightly different group of people. Throughout all the rooms he dug during his early 20th century excavations, he found sterile layers of windblown sand and ruined debris from falling walls and ceilings. In this debris and under the sand, he found Chaco-like pottery and artifacts. In addition, there were surprisingly few burial sites. Even today, archeologists have located few Chaco-type burials in Chaco Canyon itself. Whatever the burial customs of the Chaco people may have been, they have eluded archeologists for many decades. The absence of burials of this period at Aztec is a clue that probably a group of Chaco-like people, bearing the distinctive Chaco culture, may actually have moved into the Aztec area.Granting that the local sandstone was not quite as easily worked as that at Chaco, the large-size rooms, the high ceilings, the banded-veneer masonry walls, the large doorways, and other techniques used were very similar to the architectural techniques of the Chaco area. Overlying the Chaco debris and sterile sand layers, Morris found pottery, household utensils, and burials characteristic of the classic Mesa Verde Perioda period which occurred later than the great Chaco Period. In addition, there were obvious architectural signs of rebuilding and remodeling within the pueblo. Large Chaco-type rooms had been made smaller by wattle-and-daub partition walls, while doorways had been shortened and narrowed more like the ones at Mesa Verde. Thus there were two definite periods of occupation at Aztec, one by a Chaco-like people and one by a Mesa Verde-type people.The author of the passage likely mentions both Morris and the tree-ring dates in order toa)Explain how both natural and man-made evidence contributes to debunking a myth about a particular site.b)Describe how the later remodeling of Aztec was in the Mesa Verde-style.c)Challenge the idea that the Mesa Verde people preceded the Chaco people at Aztec.d)Bolster his/her own argument through both recently discovered and historical evidence.e)Prove that only the Chaco and Mesa Verde people lived at Aztec.Correct answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer? is done on EduRev Study Group by GMAT Students. The Questions and Answers of The two construction periods at Aztec, New Mexico, as indicated by the modern tree-ring dating, are corroborated nicely by other evidence found by archaeologist Earl H. Morris in the 1920s that Aztec actually was built by one group of people, abandoned, and then reoccupied at a later date by a slightly different group of people. Throughout all the rooms he dug during his early 20th century excavations, he found sterile layers of windblown sand and ruined debris from falling walls and ceilings. In this debris and under the sand, he found Chaco-like pottery and artifacts. In addition, there were surprisingly few burial sites. Even today, archeologists have located few Chaco-type burials in Chaco Canyon itself. Whatever the burial customs of the Chaco people may have been, they have eluded archeologists for many decades. The absence of burials of this period at Aztec is a clue that probably a group of Chaco-like people, bearing the distinctive Chaco culture, may actually have moved into the Aztec area.Granting that the local sandstone was not quite as easily worked as that at Chaco, the large-size rooms, the high ceilings, the banded-veneer masonry walls, the large doorways, and other techniques used were very similar to the architectural techniques of the Chaco area. Overlying the Chaco debris and sterile sand layers, Morris found pottery, household utensils, and burials characteristic of the classic Mesa Verde Perioda period which occurred later than the great Chaco Period. In addition, there were obvious architectural signs of rebuilding and remodeling within the pueblo. Large Chaco-type rooms had been made smaller by wattle-and-daub partition walls, while doorways had been shortened and narrowed more like the ones at Mesa Verde. Thus there were two definite periods of occupation at Aztec, one by a Chaco-like people and one by a Mesa Verde-type people.The author of the passage likely mentions both Morris and the tree-ring dates in order toa)Explain how both natural and man-made evidence contributes to debunking a myth about a particular site.b)Describe how the later remodeling of Aztec was in the Mesa Verde-style.c)Challenge the idea that the Mesa Verde people preceded the Chaco people at Aztec.d)Bolster his/her own argument through both recently discovered and historical evidence.e)Prove that only the Chaco and Mesa Verde people lived at Aztec.Correct answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer? are solved by group of students and teacher of GMAT, which is also the largest student community of GMAT. If the answer is not available please wait for a while and a community member will probably answer this soon. You can study other questions, MCQs, videos and tests for GMAT on EduRev and even discuss your questions like The two construction periods at Aztec, New Mexico, as indicated by the modern tree-ring dating, are corroborated nicely by other evidence found by archaeologist Earl H. Morris in the 1920s that Aztec actually was built by one group of people, abandoned, and then reoccupied at a later date by a slightly different group of people. Throughout all the rooms he dug during his early 20th century excavations, he found sterile layers of windblown sand and ruined debris from falling walls and ceilings. In this debris and under the sand, he found Chaco-like pottery and artifacts. In addition, there were surprisingly few burial sites. Even today, archeologists have located few Chaco-type burials in Chaco Canyon itself. Whatever the burial customs of the Chaco people may have been, they have eluded archeologists for many decades. The absence of burials of this period at Aztec is a clue that probably a group of Chaco-like people, bearing the distinctive Chaco culture, may actually have moved into the Aztec area.Granting that the local sandstone was not quite as easily worked as that at Chaco, the large-size rooms, the high ceilings, the banded-veneer masonry walls, the large doorways, and other techniques used were very similar to the architectural techniques of the Chaco area. Overlying the Chaco debris and sterile sand layers, Morris found pottery, household utensils, and burials characteristic of the classic Mesa Verde Perioda period which occurred later than the great Chaco Period. In addition, there were obvious architectural signs of rebuilding and remodeling within the pueblo. Large Chaco-type rooms had been made smaller by wattle-and-daub partition walls, while doorways had been shortened and narrowed more like the ones at Mesa Verde. Thus there were two definite periods of occupation at Aztec, one by a Chaco-like people and one by a Mesa Verde-type people.The author of the passage likely mentions both Morris and the tree-ring dates in order toa)Explain how both natural and man-made evidence contributes to debunking a myth about a particular site.b)Describe how the later remodeling of Aztec was in the Mesa Verde-style.c)Challenge the idea that the Mesa Verde people preceded the Chaco people at Aztec.d)Bolster his/her own argument through both recently discovered and historical evidence.e)Prove that only the Chaco and Mesa Verde people lived at Aztec.Correct answer is option 'D'. Can you explain this answer? over here on EduRev! Apart from being the largest GMAT community, EduRev has the largest solved Question bank for GMAT.