Daily Analysis of 'The Hindu' - 27th June, 2020 Current Affairs Notes | EduRev

Daily Current Affairs- The Hindu

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Current Affairs : Daily Analysis of 'The Hindu' - 27th June, 2020 Current Affairs Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


Science vs nonsense
Getting out of the ‘guns, germs and steel’ crisis
The pandemic imposes a steep learning curve
NEWS
Page 2


Science vs nonsense
Getting out of the ‘guns, germs and steel’ crisis
The pandemic imposes a steep learning curve
NEWS
Science vs nonsense
?The unrelenting spread of COVID-19 has set off both mass
anxiety and a clamour for a panacea.
?Fear paves the way for profiteers.
?Patanjali A yurved’ s recent claim of having discovered a
“cure ” and the publicity that this garnered, bypassing every
regulatory requirement without any serious consequence so
far, shows that In dia’ s regulatory checks and balances are
wanting.
?Quackery and the potency of ‘magic drugs ’ are a part of life
in India.
?As it now emerges, the company has probably
misrepresented the drug’ s efficacy.
Page 3


Science vs nonsense
Getting out of the ‘guns, germs and steel’ crisis
The pandemic imposes a steep learning curve
NEWS
Science vs nonsense
?The unrelenting spread of COVID-19 has set off both mass
anxiety and a clamour for a panacea.
?Fear paves the way for profiteers.
?Patanjali A yurved’ s recent claim of having discovered a
“cure ” and the publicity that this garnered, bypassing every
regulatory requirement without any serious consequence so
far, shows that In dia’ s regulatory checks and balances are
wanting.
?Quackery and the potency of ‘magic drugs ’ are a part of life
in India.
?As it now emerges, the company has probably
misrepresented the drug’ s efficacy.
?The clinical trial tested the drug on 45 and
another 50 were administered a placebo.
?All of the participants had tested positive for the
virus.
?On the third day, 31 who were given the drug
recovered and 25 of those on the placebo
recovered.
?Nor submitted it for peer-review.
?Therefore, the com p an y’ s claim of a cure by all
accounts was a clear subversion of the scientific
process.
Page 4


Science vs nonsense
Getting out of the ‘guns, germs and steel’ crisis
The pandemic imposes a steep learning curve
NEWS
Science vs nonsense
?The unrelenting spread of COVID-19 has set off both mass
anxiety and a clamour for a panacea.
?Fear paves the way for profiteers.
?Patanjali A yurved’ s recent claim of having discovered a
“cure ” and the publicity that this garnered, bypassing every
regulatory requirement without any serious consequence so
far, shows that In dia’ s regulatory checks and balances are
wanting.
?Quackery and the potency of ‘magic drugs ’ are a part of life
in India.
?As it now emerges, the company has probably
misrepresented the drug’ s efficacy.
?The clinical trial tested the drug on 45 and
another 50 were administered a placebo.
?All of the participants had tested positive for the
virus.
?On the third day, 31 who were given the drug
recovered and 25 of those on the placebo
recovered.
?Nor submitted it for peer-review.
?Therefore, the com p an y’ s claim of a cure by all
accounts was a clear subversion of the scientific
process.
?When hydroxychloroquine was being touted as a potential wonder drug
for COVID-19, some of Indi a’ s scientists were quick to join a global
opprobrium that raised methodological issues with a study in The Lancet,
that claimed no effect — and even harm — from HCQ.
?Thus, more than the outcome, it is the method deployed that ought to
be scrutinised by scientists to reinforce public trust in scientific
assessment.
?There has always been a tension between traditional Indian systems of
medicine and pharmaceutical drugs but there is now consensus in Ind ia’ s
regulatory system that claims by both systems of developing safe
efficacious drugs must pass clinical trials.
?It is well within the domain of institutions of the ICMR or the CSIR or
national science academies to call out a breach of due process in the
appraisal of any drug, whether allopathic, ayurvedic or homeopathic.
Page 5


Science vs nonsense
Getting out of the ‘guns, germs and steel’ crisis
The pandemic imposes a steep learning curve
NEWS
Science vs nonsense
?The unrelenting spread of COVID-19 has set off both mass
anxiety and a clamour for a panacea.
?Fear paves the way for profiteers.
?Patanjali A yurved’ s recent claim of having discovered a
“cure ” and the publicity that this garnered, bypassing every
regulatory requirement without any serious consequence so
far, shows that In dia’ s regulatory checks and balances are
wanting.
?Quackery and the potency of ‘magic drugs ’ are a part of life
in India.
?As it now emerges, the company has probably
misrepresented the drug’ s efficacy.
?The clinical trial tested the drug on 45 and
another 50 were administered a placebo.
?All of the participants had tested positive for the
virus.
?On the third day, 31 who were given the drug
recovered and 25 of those on the placebo
recovered.
?Nor submitted it for peer-review.
?Therefore, the com p an y’ s claim of a cure by all
accounts was a clear subversion of the scientific
process.
?When hydroxychloroquine was being touted as a potential wonder drug
for COVID-19, some of Indi a’ s scientists were quick to join a global
opprobrium that raised methodological issues with a study in The Lancet,
that claimed no effect — and even harm — from HCQ.
?Thus, more than the outcome, it is the method deployed that ought to
be scrutinised by scientists to reinforce public trust in scientific
assessment.
?There has always been a tension between traditional Indian systems of
medicine and pharmaceutical drugs but there is now consensus in Ind ia’ s
regulatory system that claims by both systems of developing safe
efficacious drugs must pass clinical trials.
?It is well within the domain of institutions of the ICMR or the CSIR or
national science academies to call out a breach of due process in the
appraisal of any drug, whether allopathic, ayurvedic or homeopathic.
Getting out of the ‘guns, germs and steel’ crisis
?India faces a “guns, germs and steel ” crisis.
?There are Chinese “guns” on the borders.
?There are coronavirus “germs” in our bodies.
?There are “stee l” makers and other businesses on the verge
of bankruptcy.
?Arguably, this is the gravest confluence of military,
health and economic crises threatening our nation in
more than a generation.
?Each of these would qualify as an independent, large
crisis by itself, warranting a specific resolution.
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