Daily Analysis of 'The Hindu' - 29th July, 2020 Current Affairs Notes | EduRev

Current Affairs & Hindu Analysis: Daily, Weekly & Monthly

Current Affairs : Daily Analysis of 'The Hindu' - 29th July, 2020 Current Affairs Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


 
 The Hindu Analysis: 29 July 2020
 
 1) Digging deeper: On GST compensation-
 
  GS  3-  Indian  Economy  and  issues  relating  to planning, mobilization of
 resources, growth, development and employment
 
 CONTEXT:
1.   Four months into FY2020-21, the Centre has ?nally managed to pay
  States the compensation due to them for the previous year under the
 GST regime.
2.   This may come as a breather(relief ) for States seeking to ?nance
  e?orts to ramp up(increase) public health-care capacity and
  contain COVID-19’s detrimental(harmful) e?ects on vulnerable
 sections.
  
 
Page 2


 
 The Hindu Analysis: 29 July 2020
 
 1) Digging deeper: On GST compensation-
 
  GS  3-  Indian  Economy  and  issues  relating  to planning, mobilization of
 resources, growth, development and employment
 
 CONTEXT:
1.   Four months into FY2020-21, the Centre has ?nally managed to pay
  States the compensation due to them for the previous year under the
 GST regime.
2.   This may come as a breather(relief ) for States seeking to ?nance
  e?orts to ramp up(increase) public health-care capacity and
  contain COVID-19’s detrimental(harmful) e?ects on vulnerable
 sections.
  
 
 
 
  
 COMPENSATION:
1.   The last instalment of  ?13,806 crore for March 2020 was paid out
 recently, taking the total payments for the year to  ?1,65,302 crore.
2.   To refresh, States were guaranteed compensation from the Centre for
  the ?rst ?ve years of the new indirect tax regime introduced in July
 2017.
3.   Compensation was to be provided for the revenues they lost after the
  shift from the earlier system where States had the power to levy some
 
Page 3


 
 The Hindu Analysis: 29 July 2020
 
 1) Digging deeper: On GST compensation-
 
  GS  3-  Indian  Economy  and  issues  relating  to planning, mobilization of
 resources, growth, development and employment
 
 CONTEXT:
1.   Four months into FY2020-21, the Centre has ?nally managed to pay
  States the compensation due to them for the previous year under the
 GST regime.
2.   This may come as a breather(relief ) for States seeking to ?nance
  e?orts to ramp up(increase) public health-care capacity and
  contain COVID-19’s detrimental(harmful) e?ects on vulnerable
 sections.
  
 
 
 
  
 COMPENSATION:
1.   The last instalment of  ?13,806 crore for March 2020 was paid out
 recently, taking the total payments for the year to  ?1,65,302 crore.
2.   To refresh, States were guaranteed compensation from the Centre for
  the ?rst ?ve years of the new indirect tax regime introduced in July
 2017.
3.   Compensation was to be provided for the revenues they lost after the
  shift from the earlier system where States had the power to levy some
 
 
 indirect taxes on economic activity.
4.   This compensation assumed a 14% annual growth rate in a State’s
  revenue, with 2015-16 as the base year, and was to be paid out from
  a compensation cess levied on top of the speci?ed GST rate on luxury
 and sin goods.
5.   With growth down over the previous ?scal year even before the
  pandemic waylaid the economy, the assumptions of the
 not-too-distant past are beginning to hurt.
6.   Compensation cess(tax on tax) under GST last year was almost
 ?70,000 crore less than the payments due to States.
  
 DAUNTING TASK:
1.   This gap is likely to enlarge further this year with expected economic
 contraction denting(a?ecting) GST collections as well.
2.   Compensation cess in?ows could shrink even more with people
  curbing discretionary spending on luxury goods in order to conserve
 capital or stay a?oat in the pandemic-hit economy.
3.   A little over half of the shortfall in last year’s cess kitty has been
  plugged(?lled) by tapping cess balances from the ?rst two years of
 GST implementation.
4.   The rest has been conjured up(taken) from the Consolidated Fund
  of India by debiting Integrated GST (IGST) funds that were lying with
 the Centre.
5.   IGST is levied on inter-State supply of goods and services and some of
  this levy collected in 2017-18 — the ?rst year of GST when systems
  were still a tad ad-hoc(temporary) — had not yet been allocated to
 States.
6.   Having thus drawn on these unintended contingent reserves, paying
  compensation to States this year is going to be even more
 daunting(challenging) for the Centre.
 
Page 4


 
 The Hindu Analysis: 29 July 2020
 
 1) Digging deeper: On GST compensation-
 
  GS  3-  Indian  Economy  and  issues  relating  to planning, mobilization of
 resources, growth, development and employment
 
 CONTEXT:
1.   Four months into FY2020-21, the Centre has ?nally managed to pay
  States the compensation due to them for the previous year under the
 GST regime.
2.   This may come as a breather(relief ) for States seeking to ?nance
  e?orts to ramp up(increase) public health-care capacity and
  contain COVID-19’s detrimental(harmful) e?ects on vulnerable
 sections.
  
 
 
 
  
 COMPENSATION:
1.   The last instalment of  ?13,806 crore for March 2020 was paid out
 recently, taking the total payments for the year to  ?1,65,302 crore.
2.   To refresh, States were guaranteed compensation from the Centre for
  the ?rst ?ve years of the new indirect tax regime introduced in July
 2017.
3.   Compensation was to be provided for the revenues they lost after the
  shift from the earlier system where States had the power to levy some
 
 
 indirect taxes on economic activity.
4.   This compensation assumed a 14% annual growth rate in a State’s
  revenue, with 2015-16 as the base year, and was to be paid out from
  a compensation cess levied on top of the speci?ed GST rate on luxury
 and sin goods.
5.   With growth down over the previous ?scal year even before the
  pandemic waylaid the economy, the assumptions of the
 not-too-distant past are beginning to hurt.
6.   Compensation cess(tax on tax) under GST last year was almost
 ?70,000 crore less than the payments due to States.
  
 DAUNTING TASK:
1.   This gap is likely to enlarge further this year with expected economic
 contraction denting(a?ecting) GST collections as well.
2.   Compensation cess in?ows could shrink even more with people
  curbing discretionary spending on luxury goods in order to conserve
 capital or stay a?oat in the pandemic-hit economy.
3.   A little over half of the shortfall in last year’s cess kitty has been
  plugged(?lled) by tapping cess balances from the ?rst two years of
 GST implementation.
4.   The rest has been conjured up(taken) from the Consolidated Fund
  of India by debiting Integrated GST (IGST) funds that were lying with
 the Centre.
5.   IGST is levied on inter-State supply of goods and services and some of
  this levy collected in 2017-18 — the ?rst year of GST when systems
  were still a tad ad-hoc(temporary) — had not yet been allocated to
 States.
6.   Having thus drawn on these unintended contingent reserves, paying
  compensation to States this year is going to be even more
 daunting(challenging) for the Centre.
 
 
7.   At the last GST Council meeting in June, Finance Minister had said
  the Council would convene again in July just to discuss the possible
 alternatives to deal with this particular conundrum.
8.   The chief solution o?cials have been ?eshing out is for the Centre to
  raise special loans against future GST cess accruals in order to help
 meet its compensation promise to States.
9.   There is no sign of that meeting being scheduled yet. That the
  pandemic’s economic havoc has thrown up multiple challenges for
 North Block mandarins(o?cials) is understandable.
10.   But with a third of the ?scal year almost over, it would help the
  Centre and the States to battle the virus more e?ectively if they had
 more certainty and clarity on the cash at their disposal.
  
 CONCLUSION:
  With  GST  collections  set  to  shrink,  the  Centre      must      ?nd      new      ways      to
 compensate    States.
  
  
  
 2) The cost of haste: On drugs, vaccines and regulators-
  GS  2-  Issues  relating  to  development  and  management  of  Social
 Sector/Services relating to Health
  
 
Page 5


 
 The Hindu Analysis: 29 July 2020
 
 1) Digging deeper: On GST compensation-
 
  GS  3-  Indian  Economy  and  issues  relating  to planning, mobilization of
 resources, growth, development and employment
 
 CONTEXT:
1.   Four months into FY2020-21, the Centre has ?nally managed to pay
  States the compensation due to them for the previous year under the
 GST regime.
2.   This may come as a breather(relief ) for States seeking to ?nance
  e?orts to ramp up(increase) public health-care capacity and
  contain COVID-19’s detrimental(harmful) e?ects on vulnerable
 sections.
  
 
 
 
  
 COMPENSATION:
1.   The last instalment of  ?13,806 crore for March 2020 was paid out
 recently, taking the total payments for the year to  ?1,65,302 crore.
2.   To refresh, States were guaranteed compensation from the Centre for
  the ?rst ?ve years of the new indirect tax regime introduced in July
 2017.
3.   Compensation was to be provided for the revenues they lost after the
  shift from the earlier system where States had the power to levy some
 
 
 indirect taxes on economic activity.
4.   This compensation assumed a 14% annual growth rate in a State’s
  revenue, with 2015-16 as the base year, and was to be paid out from
  a compensation cess levied on top of the speci?ed GST rate on luxury
 and sin goods.
5.   With growth down over the previous ?scal year even before the
  pandemic waylaid the economy, the assumptions of the
 not-too-distant past are beginning to hurt.
6.   Compensation cess(tax on tax) under GST last year was almost
 ?70,000 crore less than the payments due to States.
  
 DAUNTING TASK:
1.   This gap is likely to enlarge further this year with expected economic
 contraction denting(a?ecting) GST collections as well.
2.   Compensation cess in?ows could shrink even more with people
  curbing discretionary spending on luxury goods in order to conserve
 capital or stay a?oat in the pandemic-hit economy.
3.   A little over half of the shortfall in last year’s cess kitty has been
  plugged(?lled) by tapping cess balances from the ?rst two years of
 GST implementation.
4.   The rest has been conjured up(taken) from the Consolidated Fund
  of India by debiting Integrated GST (IGST) funds that were lying with
 the Centre.
5.   IGST is levied on inter-State supply of goods and services and some of
  this levy collected in 2017-18 — the ?rst year of GST when systems
  were still a tad ad-hoc(temporary) — had not yet been allocated to
 States.
6.   Having thus drawn on these unintended contingent reserves, paying
  compensation to States this year is going to be even more
 daunting(challenging) for the Centre.
 
 
7.   At the last GST Council meeting in June, Finance Minister had said
  the Council would convene again in July just to discuss the possible
 alternatives to deal with this particular conundrum.
8.   The chief solution o?cials have been ?eshing out is for the Centre to
  raise special loans against future GST cess accruals in order to help
 meet its compensation promise to States.
9.   There is no sign of that meeting being scheduled yet. That the
  pandemic’s economic havoc has thrown up multiple challenges for
 North Block mandarins(o?cials) is understandable.
10.   But with a third of the ?scal year almost over, it would help the
  Centre and the States to battle the virus more e?ectively if they had
 more certainty and clarity on the cash at their disposal.
  
 CONCLUSION:
  With  GST  collections  set  to  shrink,  the  Centre      must      ?nd      new      ways      to
 compensate    States.
  
  
  
 2) The cost of haste: On drugs, vaccines and regulators-
  GS  2-  Issues  relating  to  development  and  management  of  Social
 Sector/Services relating to Health
  
 
 
 
 CONTEXT:
1.   So far-reaching are the e?ects of COVID-19 that it has
  harried(troubled) drug regulatory authorities, usually the most
 risk-averse within the bureaucracy.
2.   ‘Do no harm’ is the driving principle of drug regulation and this is
  re?ected in the thicket of documents and permissions that stand
 before the average novel drug or vaccine.
3.   However, SARS-CoV-2, while mostly non-lethal, kills across
  demography and age-groups to confound(confuse) sophisticated
 care systems.
 
Read More
Offer running on EduRev: Apply code STAYHOME200 to get INR 200 off on our premium plan EduRev Infinity!

Related Searches

Daily Analysis of 'The Hindu' - 29th July

,

2020 Current Affairs Notes | EduRev

,

past year papers

,

mock tests for examination

,

Extra Questions

,

Viva Questions

,

Exam

,

ppt

,

study material

,

Objective type Questions

,

practice quizzes

,

2020 Current Affairs Notes | EduRev

,

pdf

,

Summary

,

2020 Current Affairs Notes | EduRev

,

shortcuts and tricks

,

Semester Notes

,

Important questions

,

Daily Analysis of 'The Hindu' - 29th July

,

Sample Paper

,

Daily Analysis of 'The Hindu' - 29th July

,

Previous Year Questions with Solutions

,

video lectures

,

Free

,

MCQs

;