NCERT Textbook Chapter 7 - New Questions and Ideas, Class 6 SST (History) Class 6 Notes | EduRev

History(Prelims) by UPSC Toppers

Class 6 : NCERT Textbook Chapter 7 - New Questions and Ideas, Class 6 SST (History) Class 6 Notes | EduRev

 Page 1


57 n
Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip
This was the first time Anagha was going on a school
trip. They boarded the train from Pune (in Maharashtra)
late at night, to go all the way to Varanasi (in Uttar
Pradesh). Her mother, who came to see her off at the
station, told the teacher: “Do tell the children about the
Buddha, and take them to see Sarnath as well.”
The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha
Siddhartha, also known as Gautama, the founder
of Buddhism, was born about 2500 years ago.
This was a time of rapid change in the lives of
people. As you saw in Chapter 5, some kings in
the mahajanapadas were growing more powerful.
New cities were developing, and life was changing
in the villages as well (see Chapter 9). Many
thinkers were trying to understand these changes
in society. They also wanted to try and find out
the true meaning of life.
The Buddha belonged to a small gana known
as the Sakya gana, and was a kshatriya. When he
was a young man, he left the comforts of his home
in search of knowledge. He wandered for several
years, meeting and holding discussions with other
thinkers. He finally decided to find his own path
to realisation, and meditated for days on end under
a peepal tree at Bodh Gaya in Bihar, where he
attained enlightenment. After that, he was known
as the Buddha or the Wise One. He then went to
Sarnath, near Varanasi, where he taught for the
first time. He spent the rest of his life travelling on
foot, going from place to place, teaching people,
till he passed away at Kusinara.
CHAPTER 6
NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS
NEW QUESTIONS AND
IDEAS
2020-21
©  NCERT 
not to be republished
Page 2


57 n
Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip
This was the first time Anagha was going on a school
trip. They boarded the train from Pune (in Maharashtra)
late at night, to go all the way to Varanasi (in Uttar
Pradesh). Her mother, who came to see her off at the
station, told the teacher: “Do tell the children about the
Buddha, and take them to see Sarnath as well.”
The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha
Siddhartha, also known as Gautama, the founder
of Buddhism, was born about 2500 years ago.
This was a time of rapid change in the lives of
people. As you saw in Chapter 5, some kings in
the mahajanapadas were growing more powerful.
New cities were developing, and life was changing
in the villages as well (see Chapter 9). Many
thinkers were trying to understand these changes
in society. They also wanted to try and find out
the true meaning of life.
The Buddha belonged to a small gana known
as the Sakya gana, and was a kshatriya. When he
was a young man, he left the comforts of his home
in search of knowledge. He wandered for several
years, meeting and holding discussions with other
thinkers. He finally decided to find his own path
to realisation, and meditated for days on end under
a peepal tree at Bodh Gaya in Bihar, where he
attained enlightenment. After that, he was known
as the Buddha or the Wise One. He then went to
Sarnath, near Varanasi, where he taught for the
first time. He spent the rest of his life travelling on
foot, going from place to place, teaching people,
till he passed away at Kusinara.
CHAPTER 6
NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS
NEW QUESTIONS AND
IDEAS
2020-21
©  NCERT 
not to be republished
n 58
OUR PASTS–I
The Buddha taught that life is full of suffering
and unhappiness. This is caused because we have
cravings and desires (which often cannot be
fulfilled). Sometimes, even if we get what we want,
we are not satisfied, and want even more (or want
other things). The Buddha described this as thirst
or tanha. He taught that this constant craving
could be removed by following moderation in
everything.
He also taught people to be kind, and to
respect the lives of others, including animals. He
believed that the results of our actions (called
karma), whether good or bad,
affect us both in this life and
the next.  The Buddha
taught in the language of
the ordinary people,
Prakrit, so that everybody
could understand his
message.
What was the language
used to compose the
Vedas?
He also encouraged
people to think for
themselves rather
than to simply
accept what he
said. Let us see how
he did this.
The stupa at Sarnath.
This building, known as a
stupa, was built to mark
the place where the
Buddha first taught his
message. You will learn
more about stupas in
Chapter 11.
2020-21
©  NCERT 
not to be republished
Page 3


57 n
Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip
This was the first time Anagha was going on a school
trip. They boarded the train from Pune (in Maharashtra)
late at night, to go all the way to Varanasi (in Uttar
Pradesh). Her mother, who came to see her off at the
station, told the teacher: “Do tell the children about the
Buddha, and take them to see Sarnath as well.”
The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha
Siddhartha, also known as Gautama, the founder
of Buddhism, was born about 2500 years ago.
This was a time of rapid change in the lives of
people. As you saw in Chapter 5, some kings in
the mahajanapadas were growing more powerful.
New cities were developing, and life was changing
in the villages as well (see Chapter 9). Many
thinkers were trying to understand these changes
in society. They also wanted to try and find out
the true meaning of life.
The Buddha belonged to a small gana known
as the Sakya gana, and was a kshatriya. When he
was a young man, he left the comforts of his home
in search of knowledge. He wandered for several
years, meeting and holding discussions with other
thinkers. He finally decided to find his own path
to realisation, and meditated for days on end under
a peepal tree at Bodh Gaya in Bihar, where he
attained enlightenment. After that, he was known
as the Buddha or the Wise One. He then went to
Sarnath, near Varanasi, where he taught for the
first time. He spent the rest of his life travelling on
foot, going from place to place, teaching people,
till he passed away at Kusinara.
CHAPTER 6
NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS
NEW QUESTIONS AND
IDEAS
2020-21
©  NCERT 
not to be republished
n 58
OUR PASTS–I
The Buddha taught that life is full of suffering
and unhappiness. This is caused because we have
cravings and desires (which often cannot be
fulfilled). Sometimes, even if we get what we want,
we are not satisfied, and want even more (or want
other things). The Buddha described this as thirst
or tanha. He taught that this constant craving
could be removed by following moderation in
everything.
He also taught people to be kind, and to
respect the lives of others, including animals. He
believed that the results of our actions (called
karma), whether good or bad,
affect us both in this life and
the next.  The Buddha
taught in the language of
the ordinary people,
Prakrit, so that everybody
could understand his
message.
What was the language
used to compose the
Vedas?
He also encouraged
people to think for
themselves rather
than to simply
accept what he
said. Let us see how
he did this.
The stupa at Sarnath.
This building, known as a
stupa, was built to mark
the place where the
Buddha first taught his
message. You will learn
more about stupas in
Chapter 11.
2020-21
©  NCERT 
not to be republished
59 n
The story of Kisagotami The story of Kisagotami The story of Kisagotami The story of Kisagotami The story of Kisagotami
Here is a famous story about the Buddha.
Once there was a woman named Kisagotami, whose son had died. She was
so sad that she roamed through the streets of the city carrying the child with
her, asking for help to bring him back to life. A kind man took her to the
Buddha.
The Buddha said: “Bring me a handful of mustard seeds, and I will bring
your child back to life.”
Kisagotami was overjoyed and started off at once, but the Buddha gently
stopped her and added: “The seeds must come from the house of a family
where nobody has died.”
Kisagotami went from door to door, but wherever she went, she found out
that someone or the other — father, mother, sister, brother, husband, wife,
child, uncle, aunt, grandfather, grandmother — had died.
What was the Buddha trying to teach the sorrowing mother?
Upanishads Upanishads Upanishads Upanishads Upanishads
Around the time that the Buddha
was preaching and perhaps a little
earlier, other thinkers also tried to
find answers to difficult questions.
Some of them wanted to know about
life after death, others wanted to
know why sacrifices should be
performed. Many of these thinkers
felt that there was something
permanent in the universe that
would last even after death. They
described this as the atman or the
individual soul and the brahman or
the universal soul. They believed
that ultimately, both the atman and
the brahman were one.
Many of their ideas were recorded
in the Upanishads. These were part
of the later Vedic texts. Upanishad
literally means ‘approaching and
Six Schools of Indian Philosoph Six Schools of Indian Philosoph Six Schools of Indian Philosoph Six Schools of Indian Philosoph Six Schools of Indian Philosophy y y y y
Over centuries, India’s intellectual
exploration of truth has come to be
represented by six systems of
philosophy. These are known as
Vaishesika, Nyaya, Samkhya, Yoga,
Purva Mimansa and Vedanta or Uttara
Mimansa. These six systems of
philosophy are said to have been
founded by sages Konada, Gotama,
Kapila, Patanjali, Jaimini and Vyasa,
respectively. These philosophies still
guide scholarly discourse in the
country. German-born British
indologist, Friedrich Max Muller, has
observed that the six systems of
philosophy were developed over many
generations with contributions made by
individual thinkers. However, today, we
find an underlying harmony in their
understanding of truth, although they
seem distinct from each other.
NEW QUESTIONS AND
IDEAS
2020-21
©  NCERT 
not to be republished
Page 4


57 n
Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip
This was the first time Anagha was going on a school
trip. They boarded the train from Pune (in Maharashtra)
late at night, to go all the way to Varanasi (in Uttar
Pradesh). Her mother, who came to see her off at the
station, told the teacher: “Do tell the children about the
Buddha, and take them to see Sarnath as well.”
The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha
Siddhartha, also known as Gautama, the founder
of Buddhism, was born about 2500 years ago.
This was a time of rapid change in the lives of
people. As you saw in Chapter 5, some kings in
the mahajanapadas were growing more powerful.
New cities were developing, and life was changing
in the villages as well (see Chapter 9). Many
thinkers were trying to understand these changes
in society. They also wanted to try and find out
the true meaning of life.
The Buddha belonged to a small gana known
as the Sakya gana, and was a kshatriya. When he
was a young man, he left the comforts of his home
in search of knowledge. He wandered for several
years, meeting and holding discussions with other
thinkers. He finally decided to find his own path
to realisation, and meditated for days on end under
a peepal tree at Bodh Gaya in Bihar, where he
attained enlightenment. After that, he was known
as the Buddha or the Wise One. He then went to
Sarnath, near Varanasi, where he taught for the
first time. He spent the rest of his life travelling on
foot, going from place to place, teaching people,
till he passed away at Kusinara.
CHAPTER 6
NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS
NEW QUESTIONS AND
IDEAS
2020-21
©  NCERT 
not to be republished
n 58
OUR PASTS–I
The Buddha taught that life is full of suffering
and unhappiness. This is caused because we have
cravings and desires (which often cannot be
fulfilled). Sometimes, even if we get what we want,
we are not satisfied, and want even more (or want
other things). The Buddha described this as thirst
or tanha. He taught that this constant craving
could be removed by following moderation in
everything.
He also taught people to be kind, and to
respect the lives of others, including animals. He
believed that the results of our actions (called
karma), whether good or bad,
affect us both in this life and
the next.  The Buddha
taught in the language of
the ordinary people,
Prakrit, so that everybody
could understand his
message.
What was the language
used to compose the
Vedas?
He also encouraged
people to think for
themselves rather
than to simply
accept what he
said. Let us see how
he did this.
The stupa at Sarnath.
This building, known as a
stupa, was built to mark
the place where the
Buddha first taught his
message. You will learn
more about stupas in
Chapter 11.
2020-21
©  NCERT 
not to be republished
59 n
The story of Kisagotami The story of Kisagotami The story of Kisagotami The story of Kisagotami The story of Kisagotami
Here is a famous story about the Buddha.
Once there was a woman named Kisagotami, whose son had died. She was
so sad that she roamed through the streets of the city carrying the child with
her, asking for help to bring him back to life. A kind man took her to the
Buddha.
The Buddha said: “Bring me a handful of mustard seeds, and I will bring
your child back to life.”
Kisagotami was overjoyed and started off at once, but the Buddha gently
stopped her and added: “The seeds must come from the house of a family
where nobody has died.”
Kisagotami went from door to door, but wherever she went, she found out
that someone or the other — father, mother, sister, brother, husband, wife,
child, uncle, aunt, grandfather, grandmother — had died.
What was the Buddha trying to teach the sorrowing mother?
Upanishads Upanishads Upanishads Upanishads Upanishads
Around the time that the Buddha
was preaching and perhaps a little
earlier, other thinkers also tried to
find answers to difficult questions.
Some of them wanted to know about
life after death, others wanted to
know why sacrifices should be
performed. Many of these thinkers
felt that there was something
permanent in the universe that
would last even after death. They
described this as the atman or the
individual soul and the brahman or
the universal soul. They believed
that ultimately, both the atman and
the brahman were one.
Many of their ideas were recorded
in the Upanishads. These were part
of the later Vedic texts. Upanishad
literally means ‘approaching and
Six Schools of Indian Philosoph Six Schools of Indian Philosoph Six Schools of Indian Philosoph Six Schools of Indian Philosoph Six Schools of Indian Philosophy y y y y
Over centuries, India’s intellectual
exploration of truth has come to be
represented by six systems of
philosophy. These are known as
Vaishesika, Nyaya, Samkhya, Yoga,
Purva Mimansa and Vedanta or Uttara
Mimansa. These six systems of
philosophy are said to have been
founded by sages Konada, Gotama,
Kapila, Patanjali, Jaimini and Vyasa,
respectively. These philosophies still
guide scholarly discourse in the
country. German-born British
indologist, Friedrich Max Muller, has
observed that the six systems of
philosophy were developed over many
generations with contributions made by
individual thinkers. However, today, we
find an underlying harmony in their
understanding of truth, although they
seem distinct from each other.
NEW QUESTIONS AND
IDEAS
2020-21
©  NCERT 
not to be republished
n 60
OUR PASTS–I
sitting near’ and the texts contain conversations
between teachers and students. Often, ideas were
presented through simple dialogues.
Most Upanishadic thinkers were men,
especially brahmins and rajas. Occasionally, there
is mention of women thinkers, such as Gargi,
who was famous for her learning, and participated
in debates held in royal courts. Poor people rarely
took part in these discussions. One famous
exception was Satyakama Jabala, who was named
after his mother, the slave woman Jabali. He had
a deep desire to learn about reality, was accepted
as a student by a brahmin teacher named
Gautama, and became one of the best-known
thinkers of the time. Many of the ideas of the
Upanishads were later developed by the famous
thinker Shankaracharya, about whom you will
read in Class VII.
The wise beggar The wise beggar The wise beggar The wise beggar The wise beggar
Here is a dialogue based on a story from one of the most famous
Upanishads, the Chhandogya Upanishad.
Shaunaka and Abhipratarin were two sages who worshipped the
universal soul.
Once, as they sat down to eat, a beggar came and asked for some
food.
“We cannot spare anything for you,” Shaunaka said.
“Learned sirs, whom do you worship?” the beggar asked.
“The universal soul,” Abhipratarin replied.
“Ah! It means that you know that the universal soul fills the entire world.”
“Yes, yes. We know that.” The sages nodded.
“If the universal soul fills the whole world, it fills me too. Who am I, but
a part of the world?” the beggar asked.
“You speak the truth, O young brahmin.”
“Then, O sages, by not giving me food, you are actually denying food
to the universal soul.”
The sages realised the truth of what the beggar said, and shared their
food with him.
How did the beggar convince the sages to share their food with him?
2020-21
©  NCERT 
not to be republished
Page 5


57 n
Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip Anagha’s school trip
This was the first time Anagha was going on a school
trip. They boarded the train from Pune (in Maharashtra)
late at night, to go all the way to Varanasi (in Uttar
Pradesh). Her mother, who came to see her off at the
station, told the teacher: “Do tell the children about the
Buddha, and take them to see Sarnath as well.”
The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha The story of the Buddha
Siddhartha, also known as Gautama, the founder
of Buddhism, was born about 2500 years ago.
This was a time of rapid change in the lives of
people. As you saw in Chapter 5, some kings in
the mahajanapadas were growing more powerful.
New cities were developing, and life was changing
in the villages as well (see Chapter 9). Many
thinkers were trying to understand these changes
in society. They also wanted to try and find out
the true meaning of life.
The Buddha belonged to a small gana known
as the Sakya gana, and was a kshatriya. When he
was a young man, he left the comforts of his home
in search of knowledge. He wandered for several
years, meeting and holding discussions with other
thinkers. He finally decided to find his own path
to realisation, and meditated for days on end under
a peepal tree at Bodh Gaya in Bihar, where he
attained enlightenment. After that, he was known
as the Buddha or the Wise One. He then went to
Sarnath, near Varanasi, where he taught for the
first time. He spent the rest of his life travelling on
foot, going from place to place, teaching people,
till he passed away at Kusinara.
CHAPTER 6
NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS NEW QUESTIONS AND IDEAS
NEW QUESTIONS AND
IDEAS
2020-21
©  NCERT 
not to be republished
n 58
OUR PASTS–I
The Buddha taught that life is full of suffering
and unhappiness. This is caused because we have
cravings and desires (which often cannot be
fulfilled). Sometimes, even if we get what we want,
we are not satisfied, and want even more (or want
other things). The Buddha described this as thirst
or tanha. He taught that this constant craving
could be removed by following moderation in
everything.
He also taught people to be kind, and to
respect the lives of others, including animals. He
believed that the results of our actions (called
karma), whether good or bad,
affect us both in this life and
the next.  The Buddha
taught in the language of
the ordinary people,
Prakrit, so that everybody
could understand his
message.
What was the language
used to compose the
Vedas?
He also encouraged
people to think for
themselves rather
than to simply
accept what he
said. Let us see how
he did this.
The stupa at Sarnath.
This building, known as a
stupa, was built to mark
the place where the
Buddha first taught his
message. You will learn
more about stupas in
Chapter 11.
2020-21
©  NCERT 
not to be republished
59 n
The story of Kisagotami The story of Kisagotami The story of Kisagotami The story of Kisagotami The story of Kisagotami
Here is a famous story about the Buddha.
Once there was a woman named Kisagotami, whose son had died. She was
so sad that she roamed through the streets of the city carrying the child with
her, asking for help to bring him back to life. A kind man took her to the
Buddha.
The Buddha said: “Bring me a handful of mustard seeds, and I will bring
your child back to life.”
Kisagotami was overjoyed and started off at once, but the Buddha gently
stopped her and added: “The seeds must come from the house of a family
where nobody has died.”
Kisagotami went from door to door, but wherever she went, she found out
that someone or the other — father, mother, sister, brother, husband, wife,
child, uncle, aunt, grandfather, grandmother — had died.
What was the Buddha trying to teach the sorrowing mother?
Upanishads Upanishads Upanishads Upanishads Upanishads
Around the time that the Buddha
was preaching and perhaps a little
earlier, other thinkers also tried to
find answers to difficult questions.
Some of them wanted to know about
life after death, others wanted to
know why sacrifices should be
performed. Many of these thinkers
felt that there was something
permanent in the universe that
would last even after death. They
described this as the atman or the
individual soul and the brahman or
the universal soul. They believed
that ultimately, both the atman and
the brahman were one.
Many of their ideas were recorded
in the Upanishads. These were part
of the later Vedic texts. Upanishad
literally means ‘approaching and
Six Schools of Indian Philosoph Six Schools of Indian Philosoph Six Schools of Indian Philosoph Six Schools of Indian Philosoph Six Schools of Indian Philosophy y y y y
Over centuries, India’s intellectual
exploration of truth has come to be
represented by six systems of
philosophy. These are known as
Vaishesika, Nyaya, Samkhya, Yoga,
Purva Mimansa and Vedanta or Uttara
Mimansa. These six systems of
philosophy are said to have been
founded by sages Konada, Gotama,
Kapila, Patanjali, Jaimini and Vyasa,
respectively. These philosophies still
guide scholarly discourse in the
country. German-born British
indologist, Friedrich Max Muller, has
observed that the six systems of
philosophy were developed over many
generations with contributions made by
individual thinkers. However, today, we
find an underlying harmony in their
understanding of truth, although they
seem distinct from each other.
NEW QUESTIONS AND
IDEAS
2020-21
©  NCERT 
not to be republished
n 60
OUR PASTS–I
sitting near’ and the texts contain conversations
between teachers and students. Often, ideas were
presented through simple dialogues.
Most Upanishadic thinkers were men,
especially brahmins and rajas. Occasionally, there
is mention of women thinkers, such as Gargi,
who was famous for her learning, and participated
in debates held in royal courts. Poor people rarely
took part in these discussions. One famous
exception was Satyakama Jabala, who was named
after his mother, the slave woman Jabali. He had
a deep desire to learn about reality, was accepted
as a student by a brahmin teacher named
Gautama, and became one of the best-known
thinkers of the time. Many of the ideas of the
Upanishads were later developed by the famous
thinker Shankaracharya, about whom you will
read in Class VII.
The wise beggar The wise beggar The wise beggar The wise beggar The wise beggar
Here is a dialogue based on a story from one of the most famous
Upanishads, the Chhandogya Upanishad.
Shaunaka and Abhipratarin were two sages who worshipped the
universal soul.
Once, as they sat down to eat, a beggar came and asked for some
food.
“We cannot spare anything for you,” Shaunaka said.
“Learned sirs, whom do you worship?” the beggar asked.
“The universal soul,” Abhipratarin replied.
“Ah! It means that you know that the universal soul fills the entire world.”
“Yes, yes. We know that.” The sages nodded.
“If the universal soul fills the whole world, it fills me too. Who am I, but
a part of the world?” the beggar asked.
“You speak the truth, O young brahmin.”
“Then, O sages, by not giving me food, you are actually denying food
to the universal soul.”
The sages realised the truth of what the beggar said, and shared their
food with him.
How did the beggar convince the sages to share their food with him?
2020-21
©  NCERT 
not to be republished
61 n
P P P P Panini, the gr anini, the gr anini, the gr anini, the gr anini, the grammarian ammarian ammarian ammarian ammarian
This was also the time when other scholars were at
work. One of the most famous was Panini, who
prepared a grammar for Sanskrit. He arranged the
vowels and the consonants in a special order, and
then used these to create formulae like those found
in Algebra.  He used these to write down the rules
of the language in short formulae (around 3000 of
them!).
Jainism Jainism Jainism Jainism Jainism
The last and 24th tirthankara of the Jainas,
Vardhamana Mahavira, also spread his message
around this time, i.e. 2500 years ago. He was a
kshatriya prince of the Lichchhavis, a group that
was part of the Vajji sangha, about which you
read in Chapter 5. At the age of thirty, he left
home and went to live in a forest. For twelve years
he led a hard and lonely life, at the end of which
he attained enlightenment.
He taught a simple doctrine: men and women
who wished to know the truth must leave their
homes. They must follow very strictly the  rules of
ahimsa, which means not hurting or killing living
beings. “All beings,” said Mahavira “long to live.
To all things life is dear.” Ordinary people could
understand the teachings of Mahavira and his
followers, because they used Prakrit. There were
several forms of Prakrit, used in different parts of
the country, and named after the regions in which
they were used. For example, the Prakrit spoken
in Magadha was known as Magadhi.
Followers of Mahavira, who were known as
Jainas, had to lead very simple lives, begging for
food. They had to be absolutely honest, and were
especially asked not to steal. Also, they had to
observe celibacy. And men had to give up
everything, including their clothes.
NEW QUESTIONS AND
IDEAS
2020-21
©  NCERT 
not to be republished
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NCERT Textbook Chapter 7 - New Questions and Ideas

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mock tests for examination

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Exam

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NCERT Textbook Chapter 7 - New Questions and Ideas

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Previous Year Questions with Solutions

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Free

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ppt

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shortcuts and tricks

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practice quizzes

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Important questions

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NCERT Textbook Chapter 7 - New Questions and Ideas

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Class 6 SST (History) Class 6 Notes | EduRev

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Objective type Questions

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study material

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pdf

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Class 6 SST (History) Class 6 Notes | EduRev

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Viva Questions

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video lectures

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Class 6 SST (History) Class 6 Notes | EduRev

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MCQs

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Extra Questions

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Summary

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Sample Paper

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